Happy Anniversary Mum and Dad

Wedding Bells

Remembering my dearly loved mum and dad on this,
the 71st Anniversary of their Wedding Day

~~~~~~~~~

Harry Scarborough Crout                               Kathleen Mary Allan
born Leeds, Yorkshire, England                     born Port Adelaide, South Australia
4 March 1912                                                 31 March 1925
died Campbelltown, South Australia             died Burton, South Australia
18 Jan 2007                                                  7 Sep 2007

MARRIED
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
22 December 1941

Wedding Day 22 Dec 1941. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Wedding Day 22 Dec 1941. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Off on the Honeymoon (c) C.Crout-Habel

Off on the Honeymoon (c) C.Crout-Habel

Honeymooning at Gumeracha and The Gorge, South Australia. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Honeymooning at Gumeracha and The Gorge, South Australia. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Wedding Card (c) C.Crout-Habel

Wedding Card (c) C.Crout-Habel

Open it up and look inside….

Fom the "Mother of the Bride, my Nana, Elizabeth Mary (Murray) Allen. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Fom the “Mother of the Bride, my Nana, Elizabeth Mary (Murray) Allen. (c) C.Crout-Habel

 

Copyright © 2012. Catherine A. Crout-Habel.

Cc – is for Cousin Lizzie

FAMILY HISTORY THROUGH THE ALPHABET CHALLENGE

Cc was always going to be about cousins. I have a rather interesting bunch. Some I never knew existed, like the “Crout half-cousins” in Canada and the “Crout full-cousins” in the United States. Then there are the “Ogilvie cousins” I’m now in contact with via the internet; one still living in the “old country”, Leeds, England and his Uncle who migrated down here to the “antipodes” in the 1960’s. The seafaring “Hampshire Crout cousins” make an interesting read with a couple of “kissing cousins” thrown into the mix and there are the “Murray cousins”, here in South Australia, with whom I’ve just re-connected after near on 60 years.

However, it’s “Cousin Lizzie” who has “taken the yellow jersey” and for three reasons:

     *  The Last Will & Testament of my Susan features her prominently
     *  She’s been on my mind since writing about Baby Crout last week
     *  It’s become apparent that many relatives are not clear about where “Cousin Lizzie” fits into the family, nor what it is that made her “different/ special”

~~~~~~~~~

Cousin Lizzie is the Grand-daughter of Susan Kelleher and an integral part of my Family History.

On 13 May 1855 Susan, aged 18, arrived in South Australia from County Clare, Ireland, aboard the ill-fated “Nashwauk”. She and her sister, Bridget, took up service in the Mid-North of the state – the Clare Valley – and on 13 Jan 1856 Susan married Edward Nicholls.  They had three daughters;

Catherine Ann Nicholls – abt 1856
Mary Ann Nicholls – 29 Oct 1858 
Margaret Nicholls – 5 Aug 1860

Sadly Edward died of pneumonia, just 4 years after marrying, and is buried at his workplace, Bungaree Station, Clare, South Australia.

Bungaree Homestead – 1863

Four years after the death of Edward, Susan married Timothy Rowen at St Michaels Church, Clare, South Australia. They had 4 daughters and 1 son;

Bridget Rowen – 22 Dec 1864
Eliza Jane Rowen – 1 May 1867
Andrew Rowen – 19 Feb 1870
Susan Rowen – 23 Jul 1872
Mary Ellen Rowen – 6 Oct 1874

I’m related through Susan and Timothy’s second daughter, Eliza Jane Rowen, who is my Great Grandmother. Cousin Lizzie is from Susan’s first marriage to Edward Nicholls. Her mother is their youngest child, Margaret.

Only two of Susan’s three daughters, from her first marriage, survived childhood.  Their second daughter, Mary Ann died of “Heart Disease” on 12 Sep 1874, aged 15, just one month before her mother gave birth to the youngest child, Mary Ellen. Their eldest daughter, Catherine Ann, married William Walsh. They had 5 children, 4 survived childhood and went on to create a long line of Walsh/Nicholls descendants.

By all accounts Cousin Lizzie’s mother, Margaret Nicholls, had a sad and traumatic life. On 9 Mar 1875 , at the age of 15, Margaret was the plaintiff in a Court Case against her step-father Timothy Rowen. My Grandmother, Eliza Jane Rowen, was just 8 years old and a witness. The “Northern Argus, March 23, 1875” reports,

“Timothy Rewin (sic), who was indicted of an offence against the person at Armagh, on February 7, pleaded not guilty, and as the evidence of the prosecutrix did not agree with the medical testimony, the jury were directed to acquit the prisoner which was accordingly done.”

 The court document reads,

“Plea Not Guilty – Verdict by direction of His Hon. the Chief Justice, Not Guilty”.

It seems that, after the Court Case, my Grandfather became estranged from the family. Their home at Armagh (outside of Clare) was sold and Susan moved, with her children, to Laura where they remained until 1887 when she moved to Broken Hill, New South Wales taking the youngest children with her. Over the years, many of the older children also settled in Broken Hill.

Shortly after Susan and the children moved to Laura her daughter, Margaret, married Scottish Immigrant, John William Tait, at St Johns Catholic Church, Laura, South Australia. Margaret and John had 5 children,

Catherine Jane Tait – 25 Jul 1880
Elizabeth Ann (Cousin Lizzie) Tait – 10 Jul 1882
John Edward Tait – 29 Aug 1884
Agnes Melinda Tait – 12 Oct 1886
Margaret Ellen Tait – 19 May 1889

Only Cousin Lizzie and her sisters, Catherine Jane and Margaret Ellen, survived childhood. John died at the age of 18 months and Agnes when she was 6.

Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia

As all of their children were born at Laura, it seems that Margaret and John continued to live there until 1889-1892 when they moved to Broken Hill. I believe they moved to “the Silver City” because this is where Agnes Melinda died but this needs to be verified as they may have been visiting her mother/ family at the time.

What happened next in Cousin Lizzie’s life is open to conjecture. She would have been about 7-10 years old when the family re-settled and it seems her life would have been quite difficult for, on 17 Mar 1989, my mother wrote,

“… They had a daughter named Elizabeth but who within the family was always called “Cousin Lizzie”. She was rather deaf but understood if you spoke loudly. I rather think she lip-read, she had a speech impediment due to the mid-wife who delivered her deciding to snip under her tongue believing other-wise the baby would be tongue-tied. (this practice I believe was not unusual in those days)”

To read about “ankytoglossia”, the problems it can cause and the ways in which it’s treated, even today, just click here.

Mum talked, and wrote, about how it was said that Cousin Lizzie’s father rejected her because of this impediment. Also that he deserted the family and divorced Cousin Lizzie’s mother who then took her own life. I was told how Susan took custody of her Grand-daughter, caring for, loving her and leaving her well provided for so she would never be “without a roof over her head.”

Aware that there are always “two sides” to any story, I’m always reluctant to pass on negative “family stories”  but this one needs to be told, given the contents of Susan Rowen’s “Last Will & Testament” which arrived in my “Dropbox” just last week. Susan did indeed leave all her worldly goods to her Grand-daughter and makes it very clear that she had “issue” with Cousin Lizzie’s father when she writes that the legacy is,

“… for her use and benefit absolutely and I desire that she shall have no dealings whatever with her father or sisters, and if the said Elizabeth Ann Tait cannot make her home with her Aunt Susan I desire that she be placed in a Catholic Home in Adelaide. I want a quiet respectable burial.”

Cousin Lizzie did go on living with Aunt Susan for many years after her Grandmother’s death. They arranged her gravesite memorial and, I have it on good authority, they both continued to tend Susan Kelleher Nicholls Rowen’s grave, in the Broken Hill Cemetery, for many years to come …  along with Aunt Susan’s daughter, Ann.

I have yet to discover when Aunt Susan died and when Cousin Lizzie moved from Broken Hill to the Port Adelaide district, in South Australia. What I do know is that she was a strong minded woman, living on her own means and in her own home at 6 Denman Place, Exeter in April 1934 because this is when my dad and his first wife, Connie, were living with her. My understanding is that she continued to lived contentedly and independently, with family nearby, until her death at the age of 60 on 15 May 1943 in South Australia.

Although Cousin Lizzie faced many challenges, especially as a young child, she certainly was not a “dunce” or a “dummy”, as many seem to think. It appears that her father did indeed have difficulty coming to terms with his second daughter’s “impediments” but her mother’s family gathered her to themselves … loving, caring and supporting her till the end of her days.

Elizabeth Ann Tait’s feelings for her Grandmother are very clear in the Memorium Notices she placed in newspapers, both in Broken Hill and Adelaide, for many years. The notice below is but one example.

Barrier Miner- 9 April 1934, page 2

 MEMORIAM

ROWEN – In loving memory of my
dear grandmother, Susan Rowen, 
who passed away on April 9, 1922, at
Broken Hill.

Always deep down in my heart,
Where love burns bright and true;
There’s a light that will burn forever,
In memory, dear grandmother of you.

Inserted by her loving grand
daughter L.Tait 
~~~~~~~~~ 

FURTHER RESOURCES: http://www.trove.nla.gov.au

Copyright (c) 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Bb – is for Baby Crout

FAMILY HISTORY THROUGH THE ALPHABET CHALLENGE

It’s a crisp Autumn morning in Adelaide, South Australia and I wake with the memory of “Baby Crout” nudging through my sleep be-fuddled brain.  No more dithering, no more doubting, no more questioning for clearly “the little man” is the Bb for my “Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge”. His story is rather sad, as are many, but always reminds me of the care and com-passion which so often resides in the hearts of strangers.

~~~~~~~~~

Over 41 years ago, through the anguish and confusion of my baby boy’s unexpected death, I glimpsed a side of my father never seen before. He was grief stricken and inconsolable. Many years later, when mum told me the story of “Baby Crout”, I understood.

It was April 1934 and the “Great Depression” continued to cause great hardship but Harry Scarborough Crout and Constance Elsie Evans, married 13 Jul the previous year, were eagerly awaiting the birth of their first child – a new life, a new beginning and re-newed hope for the future. Connie, sufferring from “pre-eclampsia”, was being treated by Dr Porter at the Port Adelaide Casualty, which was the only medical care available to the wife of a long term unemployed worker when, on the 21st April she went into labour and was delivered of a stillborn baby boy at the Queen’s Home, Rose Park, South Australia.

Harry Crout, riding pillion, with Sammy – NSW 1929. Copyright (c) C.Crout-Habel

Mum was ony 9 years old, Connie, her beloved half-sister, was 20 and Dad had just turned 22 when this tragedy struck. He’d only been in Australia for 6 years and most of this was spent in New South Wales, or “humping the bluey” around this wide brown land and sometimes “jumping the rattlers” and/or coastal steamers searching for work and to avoid being sent to a “work camp” in the bush. 

The Queen’s Home – 1914

So, as he was leaving the hospital and the nurse handed him a shoebox telling him to  “take it to West Terrace” he had no idea of the significance of those words. Trudging the 14kms home to 6 Denman Street, Exeter, where they were living with “Cousin Lizzie” she certainly knew the significance of the shoebox dad had placed on the kitchen table and put out the call, “Get Fred!”… Grandpa, Connie’s loved Step- father, harnessed the horse & buggy and took Dad and “Baby Crout” to the West Terrace Cemetery where our precious little boy was interred in a “pauper’s mass grave”, under the name “Baby Crout”. To add to Dad grief his beloved wife took her own life, in an excrutiating way two months later, by swallowing Lysol.

No doubt the unexpected death of his baby Grandson, Jarren Vaughan Habel, 36 years later brought many of those horrific memories flooding back.

Sunday Mail, 10 April 1934

Mum and I often lamented that “Baby Crout” had no grave or memorial then, one day in 1995, there was the newspaper article – Mr David McGowan, the West Terrace Cemetery Manager, announced the creation of a “Baby Memorial”,

“…to acknowledge the 30,000 children who died at birth, or soon after, and their parents who grieved in silence for so long.”    

Following the instructions, I soon located “Baby Crout’s” burial site at “Cemetery Extension, Path 4, Plot 6”. The “Cemetery Extension” a field at the rear of the cemetery which had been used as a site for mass graves from the 1920’s up to the 1980’s. This link will take you to the West Terrace Cemetery website where you can access the map, view the position of the “Baby Memorial” and the Photo Gallery. The mass burial site (Cemetery Extension) is marked “Road 5”, adjacent to the “Light Oval A.I.F.” 

On Thursday 7 Mar 1996, at 7.30pm and assisted by Mr McGowan, I quietly laid a bronze leaf engraved;

BABY CROUT
21 April 1934
SON OF CONNIE (NEE EVANS) AND HARRY CROUT
CEM EXT. PATH 4. PLOT 6

Although invited to the Formal Dedication Ceremony, the following Sunday, I had no need to attend. My heart, and mum’s, were at peace knowing our little boy had been claimed and acknowledged. This “heart’s ease” was only possible because of the work of David McGowan, and his supporters who were distressed by over 30,000 little bodies who lay in the forgotten fields at West Terrace Cemetery. Below is his description of the Baby Memorial they created.

David McGowan assisting in the laying of a memorial leaf – 7 Mar 1966

Thankyou Mr David McGowan
~~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family  

Merry Month of May – Music to get married by

Some of my earliest childhood memories are of mum singing as she went about her daily work, always with a song on her lips and a tune in her heart. So it’s with great pleasure that  take up Pauline’s “Merry Month of May Music (& Melody) Meme”.

It’ll be fun retrieving memories and reflecting on how music and song has been, and continues to be, an important part of my life, especially when the going gets tough. It’s also an opportunity to share a little of my own life story with my beloved children, and grandchildren, and have fun doing it 🙂

~~~~~~~~~

The theme I’ve chosen today relates to the date, i.e.10 May 2012, which is  my 45th Wedding Anniversary and was prompted by Pauline’s suggestion of “Music you fell in love to/with or were married to”. 

I was 17years old and Steve was 16 when we met, fell in love and before long decided that a life together was what we wanted more than anything else in the world. Incidentally I’m now horrified at the thought of my 14 year old  Grandson making such a decision in a little over 2 years time, but that’s life, eh? … 

Not surprisingly neither sets of parents were happy, however they did agree to our Engagement, which happened on 27 Apr 1966, and it wasn’t until plans were well under way for the Wedding to take place the following Dec 12, that first one set of parents withdrew permission and then the other. Then the first changed their minds but the second continued with their refusal. It was like being on an emotional roller coaster.

At that time you could only marry under the age of 21 with the approval of parents or a Judge and Court Order… so, we eloped. Steve joined the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and, after basic training at Edinburgh Air Base, South Australia, was posted to Wagga Wagga, New South Wales. I followed him, lived in the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), gained employment as Secretary to the OC (Officer Commanding) at the Base and we applied to the Court for permission to marry.

It was all very romantic and my favourite song, at the time, was “We’ll Build a World of our Own” by the “Seekers”.

Sadly the marriage ended after 20 years, almost to the day, and the following song personifies this.

Life is full of ups and downs, happiness and sadness, joy and pain and so it was with our marriage.  Without the pain you can not know the joy and it’s the happy times, the fun, laughter and especially our beautiful children, and now grandchildren, which remains with me and continues to enrich my daily life.  Thanks Steve.

~~~~~~~~~

Let's go Merry Month of May-ing

Let’s go a Merry Month of May-ing

 Copyright © 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Happy Times at the Habel Homestead

The smiles on the faces of the newlyweds beam from the local newspaper, “The Advertiser“, Monday 9 Apr 2012, but it’s the caption which grabs my attention;

“Tracy Walker married Tony Roberts at the Habel Homestead, Loxton”

The “Habel Homestead” is the birthplace and childhood home of my children’s paternal Grandfather, Waldermar Louis Habel (see here) and I was immediately flipped back to another wedding at this same venue, on the banks of the River Murray, Loxton, South Australia, over 100 years ago.

Wally Habel

Grandfather, Wally Habel was just 4 years old when his father, Wilhelm Emil Habel, threw a celebration which was certainly the talk of the town, if not the entire district.  The Loxton Tourism Centre reports;

“Mr Habel marked the occasion of his daughter’s marriage in a manner which caused a great flutter in riverside society as he specially built a pine hall capable of seating 80 people for the wedding.  The steamer, Gem, had 20 of Mr Habel’s guests on board, all the way from Dutton town near Kapunda.  Loxton was the centre of much rejoicing and merry making in celebration of the marriage.”

"Gem" Paddle Steamer - State Library of Victoria

Our Family History records show that on 7 Feb 1907, Lina (Martha) Habel, third daughter of Wilhelm Emil Habel and his first wife, Marie (Martha) Emilie Fielke, married Arnold Friedrich Stanitzki at St Petri’s Church, Loxton Hut.  It is believed to have been the first wedding in the newly built church.

Martha Habel & Arnold Stanitzki's Wedding Day

The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Loxton was first organised by E.J.P. Kaesler, in 1897, before the town of Loxton was formally planned.  It began as a House Church with parishioners meeting for worship in various homes. Pastor L.Kuss from the Mannum congregation was sent up river, by the Synod, four to six times a year to minister to the spiritual needs of the people.

Wilhelm Emil Habel, one of the original pioneers, established his homestead in 1895.  The country proved to be most fertile and many settlers, largely from Sedan, Mannum and Dutton, began moving into the district.  In 1904 the congregation decided to build a stone church measuring 40ft x 20ft x 14ft (12.2m x 6.1m x 4.27m) at a cost of 189 pounds ($360) with a seating capacity of 150. 

Arriving for Church at Habel Homestead

 As early as 1911 the St Petri Congregation began talking about the possibility of building a more spacious church.  The Foundation Stone was finally laid in January 1925 and 14 months later, on Sunday, 7 Mar 1926, some 2000 people came from near and far for the opening of the new church, the size and scale of which was remarkable, showing the vision of the people at that time. 

St Peters Lutheran Church, Loxton

How exciting that my children’s Great Aunt Martha was the first to be married in the original church which, unfortunately, is no longer standing.  Clearly her father was indeed “one of the most successful farmers in the district”  to be able to put on a celebration of this magnitude and it’s wonderful to think that young couples are still “pledging their troth” at the Habel Homestead, Loxton.  However it is unclear as to whether this is the same building for the original homestead, built close to the River and affected by floods, was rebuilt on higher land.

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© Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Whatever happened to you Rosa? …

Oh dear, Rosa Patience Crout … where are you??? … what happened to you after marrying my Great Grandfather Henry Eden Crout???  The last record I can find of you is in the 1881 England Census.  Did you die? … Did you divorce? … Did you re-marry? …

~~~~~~~~~~

It was 2 Jun 1869 when 20 year old Rosa Patience Crout married Henry Eden Crout in the Camberwell Christ Church, Southwark London.  The London, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921 Record shows Henry to be a Bachelor, Clerk and son of Henry Edward Crout, Master in the Navy.  Rosa is registered as a Spinster and her father, John Thomas Crout, deceased.  There would appear to be some confusion here, or falsehoods told, as a number of other records show Henry Eden Crout’s father to be a Wood, Coal and Timber Merchant and Rosa’s father whilst certainly deceased had, in fact, been a Master in the Navy.

Rosa and Henry’s address is given as 4 Victoria Place, Green Hundred Road, Camberwell and there are no relatives recorded as witnesses.  This is maybe not surprising as both grew up in Portsea, Hampshire. Their families were still living in Hampshire at the time of the marriage which begs the question … why did they marry so far from family and far from home?

It is unknown, at present, if and how Rosa and Henry and related but it seems most likely they are, given the repetition of the same name in both families… particularly Patience which is not only Rosa’s second name but the name of her Grandmother Patience (Thomasen) Crout.  Her cousin, daughter of Uncle Frederick Orlando Crout, is also named Patience and one of Henry’s half sisters is named Ann Patience Crout.  Rosa also had a brother named Hery Edward Crout, the same as her husband’s father, and a sister Eliza with the same name as her husband’s half sister. Furthermore, they all lived close to one another, sometimes in the same street. 

Of course, the replication of names in the two families is no proof that they’re related but is a likely indicator.  Research is continuing.

Rosa Patience Crout was born at Portsea, Hampshire the second daughter, and fourth of seven children to Sarah Elizabeth Ohlfsen and John Thomas Crout.  Henry Eden Crout was the first, and only child, of Mary and Henry Edward Crout and born at Gosport, Hampshire.  Henry’s mother died when he was about 5 years old and his father’s second wife, Jane Ellen Child, then gave birth to two daughters Ann Patience and Eliza Louisa Crout. 

After their marriage, the next documentation we have of Rosa Patience and Henry Eden Crout is 2 years later where the 1871 England Census records them living, as husband and wife, in Speen Hamland, Speen, Berkshire, England.

Ten years later there is a whole different story and we can only guess at what happened to bring about the change.  The 1881 Census shows Henry Eden Crout with the occupation of carpenter, married and living at 102 Palmerstone Road, Wimbledon, Surrey, London. However Henry’s wife, Rosa Patience Crout, is not living with him instead he has a “visitor” named Annie Moody and her 1 year old son, Henry Eden Moody.  Henry Eden Moody’s Birth Certificate shows he was born 21 Mar 1880 at Wandsworth Union Infirmary, Surrey, London to Annie Moody (domestic servant), father un-named.

So, where was Henry’s wife?  He was not recorded as a Widower so it would seem that Rosa Patience had not died.  Further research finally located Rosa Patience Crout in the 1881 Census where she is described as a Widowed Servant working as a cook for Amy S. Law and her three daughters. Mrs Laws is “living on income from land” and Rosa is working and living with Mrs Laws, her daughters and other servants at 36 Outrams Road, Croydon, Surrey, England. Rosa was 32 years old. 

It seems quite clear that Rosa and Henry’s marriage “broke down”, for whatever reason, but what did Rosa do after 1881?  All searches have been fruitless, to date, but I will never give up trying to discover the fate of my Great Grandfather’s wife.  Hopefully Rosa Patience Crout went on to live a long, happy, healthy and prosperous life.

Henry’s life, after the marriage breakup, is well recorded.  He went on to live a stable family life with Annie Moody and her son Henry Eden Moody. No divorce record, nor remarriage documents, have been located but Annie Moody’s and Henry Eden Moody’s surnames had changed to Crout by the time of the next English Census. The family had moved to Hampton Road, Willesden, London, by 1891 where Annie and Henry Crout (sen) continued trading in Coal and possibly other provisions for at least another twenty years and maybe beyond. Their grandaughter, Annie Ruby Crout, lived with them for some time.

Henry Eden Moody/Crout was their only child. He became a Clarinet Player in the 2nd Dragoon Guards, married Marie Ogilvie and they had two children together … Annie Ruby and, eleven years later, my dad Harry Scarborough Crout but that is another story, for another time.  

Whatever happened to you, Rosa Patience Crout? … I hope your life was a happy one.

~~~~~~~~~

SOURCES:  UK Census:1851, 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901, 1911 & 1911 Census Books
                      London,England, Marriages and Banns,1754-1921
                      England & Wales Free BMD Birth Index 1837-1915
                      Birth Certificate for Henry Eden Moody

©  Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family