The passing of an era…

“Ta bron orm” … the sadness is upon me.

The passing of an era happened less than 24 hours ago.

Leslie Eden Crout. (c) June Leslie Crout.

Leslie Eden Crout. (c) June Leslie Crout.

My Uncle Leslie Eden Crout died in Canada, aged 97.  He’s the younger of my dad’s two half brother and I have no idea if Dad ever knew that Leslie existed but I’m sure they’ll be catching up now… along with their dad and all the rest of them…in that world beyond this.  I’m sending them all much love and hope that their “catching up” will be harmonious with all the past hurts and rejection put to one side and that they’ll rejoice in finally finding each other.

~~~~~~~~~

© Copyright 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Advertisements

Australia Day 2013 ~ Remembering Susan Kelleher & Harry Crout…

Australia Day Smiley FaceIt is with great pleasure that I take up Helen Smith’s 2013 Australia Day Challenge. Helen writes:

“Australia Day, 26th January is a day we celebrate what makes us Australian.

Regardless of whether your ancestor came 40 000 years ago or yesterday and regardless of where they were from, together their descendants are Australian.

Your challenge (should you choose to accept it) is to tell the story of your first Australian ancestor.”

~~~~~~~~~

I began this blogging journey one year ago today, Australia Day 2012, as a means of sharing my genealogy research, and family stories, with my Ancestor’s descendants wherever they may be. In fact, the very title of this Blog, “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family” reflects this focus which has been described in ABOUT THIS BLOG

Flag of South Australia

Flag of South Australia

There are LINKS provided below to the many stories I’ve written already about the first of my Ancestors to migrate to this wide, brown land and settle in South Australia. Some may be of interest to you.

~~~~~~~~~

On my maternal side, the first to arrive was my Great Great Grandmother, Susan Kelleher, who at the age of 18 travelled from County Clare, Ireland, to South Australia, on the ill-fated ship the “Nashwauk”.

Kelleher, Susan

* To read about the shipwreck, as Susan was finally close to land, just click HERE

* Cc – is for Cousin Lizzie, provides a great deal of information about Susan’s life

* It’s an ongoing battle to ensure that the anchor from Susan’s ship, the Nashwauk, is indeed put back on public display and does not just disappear… You can read about this HERE

* This LINK will take you through to my attempts, so far, to locate Susan’s family in Ireland

* Lately I’ve become most interested in discovering how Susan’s life, just 19 years after South Australia was colonised, compared with that of one of our greatest explorers, John McDouall Stuart. It’s a work in progress and, if interested, just click HERE

~~~~~~~~~

The first of my paternal ancestors to arrive in Oz is my dad, Harry Scarborough Crout. Like Susan, he too was an “assisted migrant” although 73 years later but for exactly the same reason i.e. as an Agricultural Labourer to enable those who’d come earlier to develop their land… always with the hope/ promise that ultimately they too would become “landholders”.

My dad as I remember him when I was a child  (c) 2013.  C.A.Crout-Habel.

My dad as I remember him when I was a child (c) 2013. C.A.Crout-Habel.

* Dad was only 16 years old when he arrived in Sydney Harbor, NSW, as part of “Dreadnought Scheme” in 1928, just as the iconic “Sydney Harbour Bridge” was reaching it’s final stages of construction. You can read about it HERE

* This LINK talks about dad’s birthplace in Leeds, Yorkshire, England… which turns out to be his maternal Grandmother’s home and has recently provided me with lots of family links 🙂

* HERE I’ve written about finally locating dah’s beloved home in Mossman Street, Windhill, Shipley,Yorkshire, England.

* Dad’s first wife, Connie Evans, who was my mum’s beloved older half sister, died 2 months after giving birth to their still born “Baby Crout”. So grateful was I to be able to ensure that there’s a memorial to him, and his parents, at the West Terrace Cemetery, Adelaide, SA.

* THIS is a fun post about one of my dad’s “antics” with his mother-in-law (x2) whilst recovering from the trauma described above.

* Just click HERE if you want to read about the marriage of my beautiful parents.

Wedding Day 22 Dec 1941. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Wedding Day 22 Dec 1941. (c) C.Crout-Habel

To finish off, I MUST share this favourite song of my dad. Relates back to his mam’s Scottish heritage. Harry Scarborough Crout, from Leeds, Yorkshire, England, loved to challenge his Ozzie children to repeat the following words as quickly as they could:

“If ye can say it’s a braugh bricht moonlicht nicht t’nicht then ye alricht ye ken…”

1511767Could we ever beat him? …       

 

~~~~~~~~~

Australian Aboriginal Flag

Australian Aboriginal Flag

Whilst being very proud of my Ancestors who fled often horrific conditions in their home – land and gave me, and mine, a better chance at life I am conflicted knowing that this was, and still is, at the expense of the traditional owners of this beautiful land we claim as our own – Australia.

Our previous Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, gave the apology. May it now be followed up with meaningful action.

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel.

Happy Anniversary Mum and Dad

Wedding Bells

Remembering my dearly loved mum and dad on this,
the 71st Anniversary of their Wedding Day

~~~~~~~~~

Harry Scarborough Crout                               Kathleen Mary Allan
born Leeds, Yorkshire, England                     born Port Adelaide, South Australia
4 March 1912                                                 31 March 1925
died Campbelltown, South Australia             died Burton, South Australia
18 Jan 2007                                                  7 Sep 2007

MARRIED
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
22 December 1941

Wedding Day 22 Dec 1941. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Wedding Day 22 Dec 1941. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Off on the Honeymoon (c) C.Crout-Habel

Off on the Honeymoon (c) C.Crout-Habel

Honeymooning at Gumeracha and The Gorge, South Australia. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Honeymooning at Gumeracha and The Gorge, South Australia. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Wedding Card (c) C.Crout-Habel

Wedding Card (c) C.Crout-Habel

Open it up and look inside….

Fom the "Mother of the Bride, my Nana, Elizabeth Mary (Murray) Allen. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Fom the “Mother of the Bride, my Nana, Elizabeth Mary (Murray) Allen. (c) C.Crout-Habel

 

Copyright © 2012. Catherine A. Crout-Habel.

Yy is for – Yesterdays in Windhill, Yorkshire.

He died 5 years ago, in his 95th year, but my dad’s words, “I’m BRITISH and proud of it!”, still ring in my ears. In this post to Gould “Family History Through the Alphabet” Challenge I’ll share just a snippet of his story and dedicate this post to my dad, Harry Scarborough Crout (1912-2007) and his beloved “mam” Marie (Ogilvie) Crout (1880-1931).

Harry Scarborough Crout aged 29years. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Those who are not family members might also like to join me, and mine, in this remembering of my dad’s “Yesterdays in Windhill, Yorkshire”.

~~~~~~~~~

First matter I want to address is why would my dad be so vehemently proclaiming such pride in his heritage? … Easy answer to that is that, after being lured to Australia, as a 16 year old lad in 1928 …  a “Dreadnought Boy”, he was constantly battling the put-down names of cocky little pommie bastard” etc. Just click here to read about his experiences as part of the “Dreadnought Scheme.”

My memory is that dad started loudly proclaiming, “I’m BRITISH and proud of it!” when we, his Ozzie children, picked up the derogatory terminology… i.e.  “pommie” to describe someone born in England.  It was then that dad began to slowly give us his side of the story and, over time, I’ve researched and come to truly appreciate this wonderfully unique part of my Heritage which I’m now passing on to my children/ grand-children and all of dad’s descendants via this blog.

My dad, Harry Scarborough Crout, was indeed  a “Yorkshire lad” , born in Leeds on 4 Mar 1912 to Marie (Ogilvie) Crout and Henry Eden Crout (Jun). You can read about this HERE.  His mum, Marie, was a “Yorkshire lass” who was born to another “Yorkshire lass” Emma Chadwick (1854-1919) whose parents were also Yorkshire born.

Dreadnought Boys arriving in Sydney on the “SS Ballarat” – 1928

Dad came to Australia as a 16 year old and never intended to stay. His intention was to make lots of money to take back home to his beloved “mam”. He steamed into Sydney Harbour, Australia, with other “Dreadnought Boys” aboard the “Ballarat” on 13 Jun 1928 just as the inconic Sydney Harbour Bridge was in it’s final stages of completion and, unfortunately, the Great Depression was starting to take it’s toll.

Nab Wood Cemetery, Shipley, Yorkshire, England

Australia was not the Utopia dad had imagined and his beloved “mam” died in the North Brierley Workhouse and buried in a Pauper’s Grave in Nab Wood Cemetery, just 3 years after dad left his homeland. He was just 19 years old, adrift in a foreign land and orphaned. Well, I’ve since learnt that his dad was still living but that’s another story for another time.

So, that’s the background and now moving onto Windhill, Shipley, Yorkshire, England. 🙂

~~~~~~~~~

As I wrote in ABOUT, on this blog … as dad’s health & senses were declining he became more and more agitated that no-one in the family had been able to find his childhood home. On my return to Ireland, in 1995, I just HAD to take the trip across the Irish Sea to check out this matter, in Yorkshire, which was causing dad such anguish.

“Shipley” can be seen just above “Bradford” on this West Yorkshire County map from Wikipedia.

A ferry trip from Dublin, Ireland to Holyhead, Wales. A  bus trip across England to Leeds and the train to Shipley, soon had me close to dad’s childhood home However it soon  began to seem like a HUGE “wild goose chase” and still remember how much my hips began to ache as the “backpack” was weighing me down … then almost like magic the most amazing of people came to my aid.

Map showing 42 Mossman Street, Windhill before the re-development of the 1960’s.

The young woman in the B&B said how her Aunt knew all about Mossman Street. I was sent to the Library and given maps to show how the re-development had removed the street of dad’s childhood home. It now became clear why nobody had been able to find 42 Mossman Street (off Crag Road) Windhill, Yorkshire, England.

Crag Road Methodist Church, Windhill, Shipley, Yorkshire, England

Crag Road Methodist Church

This same map also shows the location of dad’s school, Crag Road Primary School, as well as the Methodist Church where he attended Sunday School and the empty field he used as a short cut.

Dad’s Sunday School teacher, Miss Murgatroyd, continued writing to him until way into the early 1960’s.

Windhill Community Centre

I visited the “Windhill Community Centre”… met with some people from the  “Memories Group” and was told that one of their friends remembered my dad who had gone to Australia, but it didn’t end there.  On my return home, I began receiving letters full of information from other members of the “Memories Group” which is how I located my Grand -mother’s burial spot.  

As a child dad loved books, reading and writing, and was proud of winning an essay competition at school.  He spoke often about his weekly visit to the library, down the hill, and his battle up Crag Road laden with books.

Carnegie Library – 1900 (http://yorksphotos.blogspot.com.au)

I would to laugh when he’d speak about how on very windy days he’d get blown over. Well, I never knew what a long contuinuous haul it was up that Crag Road until trekking it myself. What a delight it was to turn right off Briggate and almost in front of me was the Carnegie Library, with Carr Lane forking off to the left and Crag Road to the right, just as dad had described it. 

I saw the remaining “back to backs”,  like dad’s home in Mossman Street, and remembered his stories about the washing stretched across the road, on washing day. The walled middens at the front, which were emptied weekly and his frustration that “mam” would not allow him to wear “hob nailed boots”, like those of “the Mill children.” How he envied them making sparks as they scraped their boots across the street which I seem to remember dad described as “cobbled.”  He also laughed when talking about how his Auntie would often say … “You could eat your dinner  off Marie’s doorstep!” It seems my Grandmother was seen to be extremely house proud.

Well, I came home with a pile of photographs and maps to share with dad. I’ll never forget the look of wonder on his aged faced as he smiled, pointed at the photos and shared so many memories that came flooding back along with those pictures of his childhood. e.g he actually remembered his mother’s number which she used at the Co-op on Briggate.

As I’ve already written,  I am sure it was the spirit of dad’s beloved “mam” which kept me going as I struggled up that seemingly endless hill. Maybe she knew that it was only a short time before the dementia would over take her little boy and his memories would be lost forever? 

Dad aged 17, riding pillion, with Sammy on their first Australian adventure – NSW 1929 (C)2012.C.A.Crout-Habel

Dad was delighted with the booklet I made for him with the photos, and his words, which not only brought many of his memories back but helped keep them alive. Eventually, Mum advised that it was probably time for me to take the book back as dad had lost interest and other family had their eyes on it. Well, I didn’t because I figured that maybe he still needed it and it did disappear, which is pretty sad, however no-one can take away the joyous rememberings of that special time with my dad. 

I can still hear his proud, young, strong voice loudly declaring,
 
“I’m BRITISH and proud of it!!!”
 
May you always RIP, Harry Scarborough Crout
 
~~~~~~~~~
 
RESOURCES & FURTHER READING:
 
© 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel 

My Canadian Cousins

How can one describe the amazement, euphoria and sheer exhilaration in not only finding that missing link in your “family story” but also making the personal connection and with the knowledge that your long lost relatives are as delighted as you are to have found each other ??? …

I’ve posted many stories about my dad, Harry Scarborough Crout, who came to Australia as part of the Dreadnought Scheme at the tender age of 16.  His intention was never to stay in Australia but simply to make lots of money to take back home to his beloved “mam”. Seems that the little boy that my dad was, at that time, really did buy into the myth/ propaganda that Australia’s roads were all but “paved with gold”.

Life’s events over took my father when his mum, Marie (Ogilvie) Crout died way before her time. Dad said that when his “mam” died he never had anything “to go home” for. He was 19 years old, alone and adrift in these strange country of Australia right in the midst of “The Great Depression”.

Harry Scarborough Crout, riding pillion, aged 17 – 1929 (c) C.Crout-Habel

Family “stories” come and go and I’ve found that some are complete fabrications but, more often than not, there is a grain of truth in every one which simply needs to be teased out… and so it was with my dad’s story of his father as a Clarionet Player in the British Army.

The most recent of my posts, re: dad’s father, was on the Gould “Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge“, titled “Mm is for – Mysterious Musicians and Mariners”.  Since then my email connections have almost gone into melt down and not just because of this blog post.

Long story to short, I now have a photo of my Grandfather, as a very young man, to compare with that of the 1899 photo of the “2nd Dragoon Guards.” Best of all is that the photos just keep flooding in, along with recently discovered “Canadian Cousins” equally excited as I am to share our family stories.  

This is the only photo I’ve had, to date, of my paternal grandfather – my mysterious musician, but which “likely lad” is he… and maybe he was “off sick” on that day?

Just perused a photo sent by one of my newly discovered “Canadian Cousins” to try help with the identification. Will put it on-line when June gives her approval 

Lots more stories and photos to come, as my newly discovered Canadian Cousins share their memories. How lucky am I, eh? Bursting out with happiness and just had to share.

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Mm is for – Mysterious Musicians and Mariners

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge

Dad certainly had one fact about his mysterious father correct – Henry (Harry) Eden Crout was indeed a Musician, a Clarionet player, in the British Army. It seems unlikely, however, that he knew that many of his father’s Ancestors were Seamen, and Mariners of some note, for no doubt he would have regaled us endlessly with delightful tales of amazing adventures on “the High Seas”. I dedicate this Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge” to my dad, Harry Scarborough Crout and his paternal Ancestors, those “Mysterious Musicians and Mariners”.

Dad came to Australia, a sixteen year old lad, as part of the “Dreadnought Scheme”. He came for adventure, and to make his fortune “to take home to mam”, but events overtook him and he remained in Australia. Whilst he talked a lot about his mum, her family and growing up in Shipley, Yorkshire, he had litte information to share about his dad. He seemed reluctant to talk about his father saying he hardly knew him because he was away a lot with the Army. I also remember dad saying that the family’s, of both his mother and father, never “got along”.

My search for this “Mysterious Musician”, my Grandfather, began with a copy of the Marriage Certificate which both confirmed and confused. The best clue was the recording of his profession as “Private 2nd Dragoon Guards”. It didn’t take long to discover that the Regimental Band of the 2nd Dragoon Guards was stationed at Fulford, York, Yorkshire, England in 1899 which is the same year that he met and married my Grandmother, Marie Ogilvie a Yorkshire lass, in York. Henry (Harry) Eden Moody, whose name and his mother’s was changed to Crout on the 1891 Census, was born in Battersea, London, England on 21 March 1880.

How excited I was to see on-line, and to be able to purchase, a photo of the Band, taken that same year, despite knowing that none of the band members are named. However, I do have a description of Henry (Harry) Eden Crout taken from his “Attestation Papers” when he joined the “Canadian Expeditionary Force” on 20 July 1915. I keep trying to pick which of these strapping young blokes is my Grand-father, my “Mysterious Musician” but no luck. Maybe you can help?  He is 19 years old in the photo and described, 15 years later, as:

A Clarionet player, 5ft 7ins tall, dark complexion, brown eyes, black hair, girth when fully extended 36 ins (rate of expansion 2 1/2 inches). Three vaccination scars on left arm and 3 scars on right shoulder. A tattoo of a Heart and Arrow on left forearm and, on right forearm, a Cross and Anchor.”

 

Below is a picture of his son, Harry Scarborough Crout, at about same age.

Harry Scarborough Crout, riding pillion, aged 17 – 1929 (c) C.Crout-Habel

Harry Scarborough Crout aged 29years. (c) C.Crout-Habel

The Mysterious Mariners

Reading that my Grandfather had a Cross and Anchor tattoo, which I later discovered is a “Maritime Cross”, flipped me right back to that Marriage Certificate. Not only does he incorrectly name himself, and his father as Harry Edward Crout when both were Henry Eden Crout but also wrongly claimed his father to be a “Retired Seaman”. What is going on here?… thinks I. Many hours, days, weeks, months and now years of research are finally bringing the answers. He used his Grandfather’s name for himself and his dad, when marrying, and also his Grandfather’s profession. It is his Grandfather who is Henry Edward Crout (1814 – 1875) and he was indeed a Seaman, first going to sea at the age of 16.

The possible reasons my Grandfather gave mis-leading information is another story, for another day. Suffice to say their daughter, my dad’s sister Annie Ruby Crout, was born 22 Dec 1899 and just one month after they married. Soon after, he went off to the Boer War and I understand that the 2nd Dragoon Guards remained in South Africa for a further 8 years, as part of the occupying force. He was simply a Private. As I understand it, the Army would not accept responsibility for re-locating his wife, and child, because the Commanding Officer had not given permission for the marriage.

After answering a lot of questions, rattling round in my head, it was soon time to focus attention on the “Mysterious Mariners” … and what a revelation that’s been. The numbers keep growing almost daily but, to date, I’ve located the following Seamen/ Mariners to be amongst my dad’s Ancestors.

Henry Edward Crout (1814-1875) Seaman, Merchant Navy (Great Grandfather)
John Thomas Crout (1772-1841) Master, Navy (Great Great Grandfather)
John Thomas Crout (1810-1859) Master, Navy (Great Uncle)
Frederick Orlando Crout (1822-1902) Master Mariner (Great Uncle)
Henry Edward Crout (1842-1912) Seaman, Navy (2nd cousin?)
Frederick Orlando Crout (1847-1930) Seaman living/working Wales (2nd cousin?)

So there you have it. A few of the discoveries I’ve made, so far, about my “Mysterious Musicians and Mariners”. When telling my daughter about this aspect of her Ancestry, her comment was “No wonder Grandad was such an Adventurer, mum”. 

If you have any thoughts on which of those likely young lads may be my Grandfather, I’d be delighted to hear them.

Cheers, Catherine

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family”

Ee – is for Elgin, Scotland

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge

As my heart thrilled to the story of the notorious “Wolf of Badenoch” – those “wyld, wykked Heland-men” burning the famed and majestic Elgin Cathedral I had no idea that later research would show the burial site of John Ogilvie, my Great Great Grand-father, to be in this very same Cathedral Churchyard. John Ogilvie is my dad’s Great Grandfather and the Grandfather of my Grandmother Marie. So it is that Elgin represents the letter Ee in my latest “Family History Through the Alphabet” post.

~~~~~~~~~

King David I

Elgin, as the administrative and commercial capital of  Moray,Scotland,has a long and fascinating history. Situated on a low ridge, between the loops of the River Lossie, Elgin was made a Royal Burgh in the 12th Century, by King David I, and in 1107 was chosen as the seat of the Bishop of Moray with its Cathedral located at Spynie, 3kms to the north. The new Elgin Cathedral was not built until 1224 and on area of ground granted by Alexander II close to the River Lossie and outside of the Burgh of Elgin. It was a thriving town with its castle on top of Lady Hill in the west and the great Cathedral in the east. Originally the Cathedral was built as a simple cruciform but, after being damaged by fire in 1270, was expanded with the choir doubled in length, aisles added on each side and an octagonal Chapter House built opening off the north aisle.

Tomb of “Wolf of Badenoch”

This magnificent Elgin Cathedral was sometimes known as The Lantern of the North” but, 120 years after being built, it came under attack and is now a historic ruin. In 1390 Alexander Stewart (Alasdair Mór mac an Rígh), Earl of Buchan and the third surviving son of King Robert II of Scotand, quarrelled seriously with Bishop Alexander Burr, of Moray, who responded by ex-communicating the Earl. An infuriated Stewart, in May 1390 and accompanied by his brigands, descended from his castle in Lochindorb and burned and ransacked the town of Forres. Not satisfied, the following month he burned much of Elgin, incuding two monasteries, St Giles Church, the Hospital of Maison Dieu and the Cathedral, destroying many of its records – legal and monastic. These were irreplaceable and a terrible loss. Terrifying the people of Elgin, and forcing them to flee into the countryside, Alexander Stewart became known “The Wolf of Badenoch” and is forever remembered for his burning of the Royal Burgh of Elgin and the destruction of its Cathedral.

“His nickname ‘the Wolf of Badenoch’ was earned due to his notorious cruelty and rapacity but there is no proof that it was used during his lifetime.”

Destruction of Elgin Cathedral – 1390

Alexander Stewart lived from 1343 to 20 Jun 1405 and held the positions of Lord Badenoch, Earl of Buchanan and later was his brother’s Royal Deputy in Scotland. Under his father’s watchful eye, nobles and many church dignitaries, Alexander Stewart did penance for his wanton destruction, was pardoned and accepted back into the church.

“Unfortunately his repentance was superficial.”

MacDonald – Lord of the Isles

In 1402 the Cathedral precent again suffered an incendiary attack. This time by the followers of the Lord of the Isles and took over 100 years to rebuild. Not completed until 1538 much of the re-construction has since crumbled away, due to the inferior quality of the stone made available to the 15th and 16th century masons, whilst the 13th century construction remains.

Elgin Cathedral continued in use until the reformation of 1560 then, in 1567 , the lead of the Cathedral roof was stripped, by order of the Privy Council and Regent Moray, and the process of decay began. In 1637 the choir roof collapsed, the rood-screen with its painting of the crucifixion was removed and destroyed in 1640 and on Easter Sunday, 1711, the great central tower fell destroying the north transept and the main arcades of the nave. By the end of the eighteenth century the once magnificent Cathedral was being used as a quarry for building stone, however, in 1824 the Exchequer assumed responsibility for the preservation of the structure. John Shanks was appointed keeper and began clearing the accumulated rubbish. It is said that John cleared;

“…3,000 barrowfuls and laying bare the foundations of the pillars of the nave, the elevations of the altar and the stairs at the western gate.” 

Elgin Cathedral

My Great Great Grandfather, John Ogilvie, was born in Elgin approximately 2 years after John Shanks began his work as a keeper for the Cathedral. At this time, the town had a population of less than 4,000 and was still largely confined to three parallel lines of streets running between the Castle and the precincts of the Cathedral. The 1841 Census shows that, 15 years later, John Ogilvie was living with his parents at “Clarks Close” and his father was working as a Carter whilst the restoration continued. Just 6 years later (1847-8) some of the old houses associated with the cathedral, on it’s west side, were demolished and a series of relative minor changes to the boundary completed. Two years later, on 7 Jun 1850, John Ogilvie married Christina McKenzie at the Elgin Parish Church. John and Christina had four children; Alexander, James (my great grandfather & father of my Marie Ogilvie), and Margaret Ann, followed by Jean.

On 10 Jan 1857 when their youngest child was just 3 months old, the family was living at “Mrs Phillip’s Close” and Christina was forced to apply for, and was granted, “Poor Relief”. John, unable to work for some time, had been admitted to Dr Gray’s Hospital and died 16 months later, at the age of 32, leaving Christina to raise their 4 children alone. My Great Grand-father, James Ogilvie, was just 5 years old with 1 older brother and 2 younger sisters.

Dr Gray’s Hospital

John Ogilvie’s Death Certificate shows he died at home, 49 High Street, Elgin on 8 May 1858, his brother James reported the death and a doctor’s certificate was provided. Although no cause of death is given, it’s clearly written that John was buried in the Cathedral Churchyard. On New Years Day 2012 I excitedly emailed the “Moray Burial Ground Research Group” to order photos of John Ogilvie’s gravestone from their on-line Elgin Cathedral Churchyard Index. With the marvels of technology two beautifully clear photos arrived on my computer the very next day. Unfortunately, although the MBGRG Index indicated a very likely match, it is not the gravestone on my John Ogilvie. Their Webmaster, Lindsay, was most hepful and wrote:

“From the death certificate, one can only assume that he was buried there. All the visible stone in that churchyard have been recorded and published and abstracted data is as on-line. This suggests that,

a)  there was no headstone
b)  a stone may have been placed but damaged, removed, lost over the years (this is not uncommon – some sandstone monuments suffer from frost and often delaminate – the inscribed surface just crumbling away
c)  the stone was a flat one, which has become buried over time

Elgin Cathedral is a very important archaelogical/historic site in Elgin, and is managed by Historic Scotland , who to date have not given us permission to investigate the presence of such buried stones. Also, we have cases where buried stones of this type are in fact blank – perhaps the family unable to afford to inscribe the stone.”

MBGRG logo

As John’s widow had sought “Poor Relief” only 16months earlier, it’s doubtful there was money for a gravestone, let alone an inscription. 

It also needs to be considered though that maybe John Ogilvie was not buried in the Cathedral Churchyard, after all, especially as in it’s Dec 2010 Newsletter the “Moray Burial Ground Research Group” reports that as early as March 1848 overcrowding in the Cathedral Churchyard was causing concern. Over the next 10 years the issue was raised several times and eventually, in the early months of 1857, land was purchased to the east of “New Elgin” for the establishment of a new cemetery.  On 28 Oct 1858, five months after John died,  the “Elgin Courant” reported the first internment.  Maybe John Ogilvie was one of the first to be buried in the new cemetery? … This certainly needs to be checked but, in my view, the most likely scenario is that my Great Great Grandfather is indeed buried in the Churchyard of the very Cathedral that those wyld, wykked Heland-men” tried to destroy. I wonder what John would think about having a whole branch of his ancestories, living here in South Australia, who are delighted to know of their familial link with his birthplace and his final resting place… Elgin, Scotland.

The restoration work continues and the conservation of Elgin Cathedral has been of great concern for successive government departments so that today the ruins remain one of the finest examples of medieval architecture in Scotland. Elgin’s population of less that 4,000, when John Ogilvie was a lad, has grown to 20,000 and much has been done, and continues to be done, to invigorate the centre of the town whilst retaining and restoring the old buildings. A relief road has been built to free the High Street of heavy traffic, and through traffic, and has opened up new vistas toward the Cathedral and Lady Hill.

To view magnificent photos of Elgin, as it is today, just click HERE.

If you have 24.55mins to spare, I recommend you settle down and enjoy the following Video of Elgin, it’s historic sites and talented people.

http://youtu.be/qhh6JmCUHA4

~~~~~~~~~

SOURCES:  Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org
                      National Archives of Scotland:  http://en.wikipedia.org 
                      Elgin Scotland Org:  http://elginscotland.org

Copyright © 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family  

Bb – is for Baby Crout

FAMILY HISTORY THROUGH THE ALPHABET CHALLENGE

It’s a crisp Autumn morning in Adelaide, South Australia and I wake with the memory of “Baby Crout” nudging through my sleep be-fuddled brain.  No more dithering, no more doubting, no more questioning for clearly “the little man” is the Bb for my “Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge”. His story is rather sad, as are many, but always reminds me of the care and com-passion which so often resides in the hearts of strangers.

~~~~~~~~~

Over 41 years ago, through the anguish and confusion of my baby boy’s unexpected death, I glimpsed a side of my father never seen before. He was grief stricken and inconsolable. Many years later, when mum told me the story of “Baby Crout”, I understood.

It was April 1934 and the “Great Depression” continued to cause great hardship but Harry Scarborough Crout and Constance Elsie Evans, married 13 Jul the previous year, were eagerly awaiting the birth of their first child – a new life, a new beginning and re-newed hope for the future. Connie, sufferring from “pre-eclampsia”, was being treated by Dr Porter at the Port Adelaide Casualty, which was the only medical care available to the wife of a long term unemployed worker when, on the 21st April she went into labour and was delivered of a stillborn baby boy at the Queen’s Home, Rose Park, South Australia.

Harry Crout, riding pillion, with Sammy – NSW 1929. Copyright (c) C.Crout-Habel

Mum was ony 9 years old, Connie, her beloved half-sister, was 20 and Dad had just turned 22 when this tragedy struck. He’d only been in Australia for 6 years and most of this was spent in New South Wales, or “humping the bluey” around this wide brown land and sometimes “jumping the rattlers” and/or coastal steamers searching for work and to avoid being sent to a “work camp” in the bush. 

The Queen’s Home – 1914

So, as he was leaving the hospital and the nurse handed him a shoebox telling him to  “take it to West Terrace” he had no idea of the significance of those words. Trudging the 14kms home to 6 Denman Street, Exeter, where they were living with “Cousin Lizzie” she certainly knew the significance of the shoebox dad had placed on the kitchen table and put out the call, “Get Fred!”… Grandpa, Connie’s loved Step- father, harnessed the horse & buggy and took Dad and “Baby Crout” to the West Terrace Cemetery where our precious little boy was interred in a “pauper’s mass grave”, under the name “Baby Crout”. To add to Dad grief his beloved wife took her own life, in an excrutiating way two months later, by swallowing Lysol.

No doubt the unexpected death of his baby Grandson, Jarren Vaughan Habel, 36 years later brought many of those horrific memories flooding back.

Sunday Mail, 10 April 1934

Mum and I often lamented that “Baby Crout” had no grave or memorial then, one day in 1995, there was the newspaper article – Mr David McGowan, the West Terrace Cemetery Manager, announced the creation of a “Baby Memorial”,

“…to acknowledge the 30,000 children who died at birth, or soon after, and their parents who grieved in silence for so long.”    

Following the instructions, I soon located “Baby Crout’s” burial site at “Cemetery Extension, Path 4, Plot 6”. The “Cemetery Extension” a field at the rear of the cemetery which had been used as a site for mass graves from the 1920’s up to the 1980’s. This link will take you to the West Terrace Cemetery website where you can access the map, view the position of the “Baby Memorial” and the Photo Gallery. The mass burial site (Cemetery Extension) is marked “Road 5”, adjacent to the “Light Oval A.I.F.” 

On Thursday 7 Mar 1996, at 7.30pm and assisted by Mr McGowan, I quietly laid a bronze leaf engraved;

BABY CROUT
21 April 1934
SON OF CONNIE (NEE EVANS) AND HARRY CROUT
CEM EXT. PATH 4. PLOT 6

Although invited to the Formal Dedication Ceremony, the following Sunday, I had no need to attend. My heart, and mum’s, were at peace knowing our little boy had been claimed and acknowledged. This “heart’s ease” was only possible because of the work of David McGowan, and his supporters who were distressed by over 30,000 little bodies who lay in the forgotten fields at West Terrace Cemetery. Below is his description of the Baby Memorial they created.

David McGowan assisting in the laying of a memorial leaf – 7 Mar 1966

Thankyou Mr David McGowan
~~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family  

The House in Leeds

The wails of the newborn babe reverberate through the ward and down the passage of the Leeds Maternity Hospital, Hyde Street, Yorkshire, England as Marie (Ogilvie) Crout gives birth to her first, and only son, Harry Scarborough Crout. 

Over the years I’ve looked at dad’s treasured Birth Certificate and wondered why a child born on 4 March 1912, in Yorkshire, was not delivered at home? C. Lovegrove comments on “Leodis“,

“I believe this maternity hospital took the ladies who
were likely
to have difficult births.”

Maybe this is the explanation.  Further weight is given to this supposition when we learn that Marie temporarily re-located from her home in Shipley for the birth.  There on dad’s Birth Certificate is her address:

“10 Meanwood Street, Leeds” 

 

Curious about this house… dad’s first home, I did a search of the Leodis data base and was delighted to discover three photos taken, from different vantage points, before being demolished to make way for new road works.  Great excitement when the photos arrived.  It’s like touching the past.  My daughter, and I, went over them with a magnifying glass and decided that Marie’s abode at 10 Meanwood Street was on the left, at the rear of the building. 

Always questioning, I wondered why she stayed in this particular house?…  Was it the home of friends, or maybe relatives? The 1901 UK Census showed that eleven years earlier, Marie’s mum, dad and 5 younger siblings  were living at 34 Servia Road, so seemed unlikely to be the family home.  I let the question go and turned my attention to other matters.

A year, or so, later “the house in Leeds” became a matter of interest again. Delighted to be in contact with an Ogilvie 2nd cousin, from Leeds, I mentioned that my dad always said he had cousins in Western Australia but I had no idea who they were or where they were likely to be living. Finding them was especially complicated because it seemed their mum was a sister of Marie Ogilvie.  Was it a sister who emigrated?  If so, who was that sister? Did she marry?  If she married, what was her new name?  When did she come? … All were questions I’d mused over throughout the years, then John passed on one bit of information which changed everything.  He recalled that the relative was female and moved to Western Australia before WW1. Sadly he believed it unlikely she ever knew that her brother John had been killed in the War.

Well, that provided a time frame and certainly focused the attention.  Remembering that the 1911 UK Census had recently been released, I did a search to find out where members of the Ogilvie family were living in 1911, the year before dad’s birth, and there it was at last! … The answer to that ongoing and perplexing question was sitting there, shining like a sparkling jewel, just waiting to be picked up.

When Marie (Ogilvie) Crout gave birth to my dad, at Leeds Maternity Hospital, she was temporarily living with her widowed mum, sisters Maggie Ogilvie and Lucy Bartle, brother-in-law Walter Bartle and 4 year old nephew, Leslie Ogilvie, in the 5 roomed home at 10 Meanwood Street, Leeds.  Whooo Hooo!!!… puzzle solved at long last.

Further research revealed that 8 months later Maggie married John Henry Baxter.  They migrated to Western Australia the following year with John travelling on ahead and Maggie arriving at Fremantle, aboard the SS “Otrantra”, on 14 Oct 1913 but that’s another wonderful story to be told on another day.

Many thanks to my cousin for sharing his precious morsel of info which enabled the sidestepping of that particular “brick wall”.  It never fails to amaze how such seemingly inconsequential “rememberings” can make a huge difference when re-constructing the events of yesteryear.

Thanks also to Leeds City Council and the Leeds Library & Information Service for “Leodis”, its photographic archive of Leeds.  Containing 52,000 new and old images it’s a joyous treasure house to those, especially from across the seas, who are researching Family History.

~~~~~~~~~

SOURCES:  “Leodis” http://www.leodis.net 
                      1901 UK Census
                      1911 UK Census

(c) Copyright. 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

A Wee Deoch an Doris


One of my dad’s favourite songs through which he linked to his Scottish Identity.

Harry Scarborough Crout, from Leeds, Yorkshire, England, loved to challenged his Ozzie children to repeat the following words as quickly as they could:

“If ye can say it’s a braugh bricht moonlicht nicht t’nicht then ye alricht ye ken…”

Could we ever beat him? … ha ha ha …