Finding Christiana…

Ahhh… Christiana Ogilvie. We found you!!!
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It’s such a joy to find a missing relative but the feelings that wash over me when finding a little child whose memory has become faded, or maybe even lost, in the mists of time are indescribable… and so it was when John and I found his Aunt, little Christiana.

John is my second cousin and Great Nephew of my Grandmother, Marie (Ogilvie) Crout.  Like Marie, he was born in Leeds, England but he migrated here to Australia, with his wife and family, in the mid 1960’s. We have only recently “found” each other through a joint interest in, and love of, Family History and it’s great fun to share our discoveries.  In a recent email he mentioned his mum saying that his dad had a sister who died as a child then shared her birth and death registration dates from his archives.

That was it and in no time, at all, we were off and away and soon found the relevant documents to put his Christiana Ogilvie firmly in her place on our shared Family Tree.

My Grandmother, Marie Ogilvie, was born the third of seven chilldren to Emma Chadwick and James Ogilvie in 1880, Leeds, England.  She had only two brothers and my cousin John’s Grandfather, also named John, was older than Marie by just three years.  I’m thinking they must have had warm feelings for each other as Marie had the honoured position as a witness at his Wedding when he married Lucy Ann Johnson in All Souls Church, Leeds, in 1897.

Buslingthorpe St Michael, Leeds, England

Later that year Lucy gave birth to their first child, a little girl, whom they named Christiana. The family were living at 4 Wharfdale Grove, Leeds on 27 Apr 1898, and John was working as a Leather Shaver, when Christiana was Baptised in St Michael Church, Buslingthorpe, Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Sadly little Christiana died in her first year of life and just a few months after being baptised. 

East Yorkshire Badge

John and Lucy went on to have another 7 children, four boys and three girls. Their fifth child, Jack, is the father of my 2nd Cousin, John, who is sharing this delightful journey of discovery with me.  John and Lucy’s last child, Doris, was just 17 months old when her father enlisted in the “6th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment“, British Army “Short Service” for the duration of WW1. 

Sadly John Ogilvie was killed in action in Flanders, France on 13 Mar 1918 and never did return to England and his family.  Lucy was both mother and father to their children continuing to live in the home they had shared at 16 Barkley Avenue, Leeds, until she passed away there on 2 Nov 1961, a much loved and honoured mother, grandmother and great grandmother. 

Christiana was named after her Great Grandmother, Christiana (MacKenzie) Ogilvie who married John Ogilvie in Elgin, Scotland.  They had four children; Alexander, James, Margaret (Maggie) and Jean.  James took on the trade of “currier”, moved to Leeds, married Emma Chadwick and named their first child, a girl, Christiana after his mother.   Their son, John, did the same.

I agree with Cousin John that the death of his Grandfather’s baby daughter is probably the reason “why the name of his grandmother never occurred again.”

Rest In Peace … little Christiana Ogilvie
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© Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family  

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Arthur Thomas Andrew ANDERSON

Remembering and honouring Arthur (Art) Thomas Andrew Anderson my former husband’s Grandfather, and my children’s Great Grandfather, who died on this day, the 17 Feb, in 1971.

Born at Bugle Ranges, South Australia, on 3 Oct 1897 the eldest son of John Frederick Anderson and Emily Adelaide Ida Harrip, Grandie’s birth was followed by 5 sisters and 3 brothers; Annie Sophia Alice, Agnes Christine Ada, Edgar Jack Brooker, Doris Elizabeth Grace, Mavis Sarah Adelaide, Stella Ruth Winifred, Hubert Ernest Ross and Raynor Verdun Harrip.

He enlisted in the 27th Battalion Australian Infanty Force, on 5 Apr 1916, and married Mary Eveline (Ev) Hembury two months later (2 Sep 1916) at her parent’s home, 27 Childers Street, North Adelaide Two weeks after marrying, Arthur Thomas Andrew Anderson embarked the “HMAT AB Commonwealth” and headed for Flanders, France and the trenches of World War 1.

27th Batt. Colour Patch

Eveline Phyllis (Phyl) Anderson, my husband’s mother and their honeymoon babe, was born on 22 Jun 1917  followed by Grandie & Nana’s son, Arthur Maxwell (Mac) Anderson, on  23 Aug 1925.

Art Anderson was active within the Returned Services League (RSL) serving as Branch President, and in a variety of roles, for very many years. He would never talk of the horrors of Flanders and trench warfare, however he always heaped great praise upon the Salvation Army and the service and comfort they gave to the Australian Forces right up there, with them, on “the front line”.

With his son-in-law, Waldemar Louis Habel, dying so young Grandie was of great support to the young family and willingly took on a fathering role for his daughter Phyl’s three children. He was a  particularly wonderful  role model to the very young and fatherless Steve, who chose to live with his grandparents for quite some time after his mother remarried.

Survived by his wife, son, daughter, seven grandchildren and eighteen great-grand children Arthur Thomas Andrew Anderson will always be loved and remembered as a caring, hardworking man of great character and tenacity – our Grandie.

May he always Rest in Peace.

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(c) Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan~Meeting Marie~Finding Family