Finding Family… dad’s 1st cousin 2x removed

Is there a more satisfying feeling when you’ve gone that extra mile, checked that extra record, about to “throw in the towel” and then SUCCESS???…¬† I’m smiling ūüėĬ†¬†

My dad’s “Crout family”, from Hampshire, England, are a complicated bunch but so so interesting. ¬†After much hunting and searching I reckon I’ve finally located all of my Great Great Grandfather’s 10¬†siblings. Takes a heck of a lot of time to do even a¬†quick search of each of them, especially if they too have large families… and some of them sure¬†do… puff puff puff.

Well, I’ve been slowly¬†working through Great Great Grandad’s siblings and finally got to¬†one of his 5¬†younger sisters, Frances Sophia Crout.¬† Her second son, fathered 15 children!!!.¬† By the time I worked through all that lot, their marriages and their children, Frances Sophia’s next child was a bit of a relief, in some ways, as no documentary evidence jumped out at me. With a sigh of relief I was about to¬†put Henry Frederick to one side with the thought that maybe he’d died young and I just hadn’t found the evidence yet. Something stopped me and how happy I am that¬†it did for, to my delight and surprise, another fascinatingly interesting part of my family “came to light”.

BDM¬†indexes, census reports, passenger lists etc. show that¬†my 1st cousin 3x removed, Henry Frederick Johnston…¬†the fourth of my 2nd Great Grand Aunt’s children married Mary. They had 2 sons and then in 1902 Henry “scarpered across the pond” to Canada¬†without his wife and children just like my own Grandfather did 10 years later. However, much to my surprise, instead of¬†this Henry setting up with a new wife and family… his wife Mary and sons; Keith Stewart and Jack Murray joined him 10 years later.

Like my Grandfather, Henry (Harry) Eden Crout, young Jack also¬†joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force and fought in France¬†throughout World War¬†1, although in different regiments.¬†I wonder if they knew each other? My Grandfather migrated to Montreal, Quebec… whilst Jack, his brother and parents moved to¬†Winipeg, Manitoba.

More work to be done yet, of course ūüôā … but what an amazing journey it’s been with these Crout’s, of mine. Despite the family stories, I’ve found¬†not a drop of Scottish blood in any of them. At least my Grandmother Marie Ogilvie’s dad, James,¬†was Scottish. You can read about that here¬†and a little about her Grandfather who was born, and died, in Elgin Scotland here.

However, I now know where my fascination with sailing ships comes from and that certainly is not just from my Grandpa, Frederick Alexander Allan.  

“Aye, aye, matie!!!” … ūüėÄ

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Copyright ¬© 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†

Dd – is for Delightful, Delicious & Delectable

FAMILY HISTORY THROUGH THE ALPHABET CHALLENGE

Researching and writing about the lives of family can sometimes make me sad.¬†When this happens, there are a number of useful strategies which soon have me bouncing back. My “Weird, Wild & Wonderful” blog is aways a happy place to play. Trawling “You Tube” for fun, ridiculous and romantic songs is another favourite and sometimes writing about amusing incidents from childhood like “Dad, fencing and Nana”, which are passed on to my descendants through this blog, soon get the chuckles going again.

Needing comforting and cheering up after my latest two posts to “Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge”, one about “Baby Crout” and the other “Cousin Lizzie”, I mused over the letter Dd and immediately “Delightful, Delicious & Delectable” jumped into my head. It’s just a little story from childhood which brings back fond memories. Maybe it will trigger some happy thoughts for you too…

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It’s 1950 in the working class suburb of Queenstown, South Australia, and just a couple of miles “up the track” from Port Adelaide where dad and grandpa worked “on the wharf”. Picture a large family kitchen with four hungry “tykes” sitting around the table, waiting for breakfast, and amazed to see their dad busy at the task. Why dad? … I have no idea. Maybe I do, but don’t want to think about it as it may bring back the sadness…

The four of us – 1950. (c) 2012 C.Crout-Habel

Anyway, dad put four bowls in front of us announcing They’re POBS – Mam used to make them for me.” Well, I’d never tasted anything so delicious and delectable in all of my four years. Sixty two years later, and still a feeling of calm envelopes me with the very thought. So, what were these magical “POBS” and what made them special? The breakfast dad put before us that day was simply a bowl filled with cubes of white bread, sprinkled with sugar and moistened with warm milk but oh so so delicious. Over the years, and¬†on rare occasions, dad served us POBS¬†but mum never did. Right from the start mum’s POBS were rejected… they just¬†didn’t taste the same.

This South Australian girl knew no other person¬†who ate POBS, or even knew what they were. I figured it was just a fun name that my Yorkshire born dad and his “mam” used for a bowl of bread, sugar and milk until, in 1995, I visited his home town of Windhill, Shipley, Yorkshire, England. Seeking the whereabouts of dad’s childhood home I met up with a delightful group of elderly people at the Windhill Community Centre, Church Street, Windhill. They named themselves the “Windhill Memories Group”, were amazed that Harry Crout’s daughter had come visiting, all the way from Australia, and happily shared their¬†memories. Lillian Moorhouse was one who maintained contact and would sometimes send copies of her pencil drawings of ¬†“Windhill of Yesteryear”. One day a booklet arrived titled “HOMECURES OF YESTERYEAR”¬†and there on page 5, to my amazement, was a description for POBS – not a made up family name at all!…

HOMECURES OF YESTERYEAR by Lillian Moorhouse, page 5.

Years later, with a “search” on Wikipedia, I discovered that POBS are a traditional Lancashire dish. The internet also has many forums & discussion groups where talk about POBS arises. It was here I learnt that POB stands for “Pieces Of Bread”¬†and also that a crushed up Oxo cube, sprinkled¬†on bread and covered with hot water falls into the same category. What a surprise to discover that POBS were also¬†enjoyed by others.

To ensure that this simple meal lived up to the title of “Delightful, Delicious & Delectable”¬† it¬†had to be¬†served in the appropriate dish –¬†one of mum’s small, rimmed, white¬†bowls¬†which were dotted with tiny pink flowers and edged with gold.

So … a delightful, delicious, and delectable meal, of bread and milk, needed to be prepared by dad and served in the appropriate dish to make my day.¬† ūüôā … happy memories.

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SOURCES: HOMECURES OF YESTERYEAR by Lillian Moorhouse © Lillian Moorhouse Reg. BB/818 No 33371. Published by: Windhill Memories Group. N.E.W.C.A. Church Street, Windhill, Shipley, Yorkshire, England.

Copyright © 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family