My Canadian Cousins

How can one describe the amazement, euphoria and sheer exhilaration in not only finding that missing link in your “family story” but also making the personal connection and with the knowledge that your long lost relatives are as delighted as you are to have found each other ??? …

I’ve posted many stories about my dad, Harry Scarborough Crout, who came to Australia as part of the Dreadnought Scheme at the tender age of 16.  His intention was never to stay in Australia but simply to make lots of money to take back home to his beloved “mam”. Seems that the little boy that my dad was, at that time, really did buy into the myth/ propaganda that Australia’s roads were all but “paved with gold”.

Life’s events over took my father when his mum, Marie (Ogilvie) Crout died way before her time. Dad said that when his “mam” died he never had anything “to go home” for. He was 19 years old, alone and adrift in these strange country of Australia right in the midst of “The Great Depression”.

Harry Scarborough Crout, riding pillion, aged 17 – 1929 (c) C.Crout-Habel

Family “stories” come and go and I’ve found that some are complete fabrications but, more often than not, there is a grain of truth in every one which simply needs to be teased out… and so it was with my dad’s story of his father as a Clarionet Player in the British Army.

The most recent of my posts, re: dad’s father, was on the Gould “Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge“, titled “Mm is for – Mysterious Musicians and Mariners”.  Since then my email connections have almost gone into melt down and not just because of this blog post.

Long story to short, I now have a photo of my Grandfather, as a very young man, to compare with that of the 1899 photo of the “2nd Dragoon Guards.” Best of all is that the photos just keep flooding in, along with recently discovered “Canadian Cousins” equally excited as I am to share our family stories.  

This is the only photo I’ve had, to date, of my paternal grandfather – my mysterious musician, but which “likely lad” is he… and maybe he was “off sick” on that day?

Just perused a photo sent by one of my newly discovered “Canadian Cousins” to try help with the identification. Will put it on-line when June gives her approval 

Lots more stories and photos to come, as my newly discovered Canadian Cousins share their memories. How lucky am I, eh? Bursting out with happiness and just had to share.

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Copyright © 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

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Mm is for – Mysterious Musicians and Mariners

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge

Dad certainly had one fact about his mysterious father correct – Henry (Harry) Eden Crout was indeed a Musician, a Clarionet player, in the British Army. It seems unlikely, however, that he knew that many of his father’s Ancestors were Seamen, and Mariners of some note, for no doubt he would have regaled us endlessly with delightful tales of amazing adventures on “the High Seas”. I dedicate this Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge” to my dad, Harry Scarborough Crout and his paternal Ancestors, those “Mysterious Musicians and Mariners”.

Dad came to Australia, a sixteen year old lad, as part of the “Dreadnought Scheme”. He came for adventure, and to make his fortune “to take home to mam”, but events overtook him and he remained in Australia. Whilst he talked a lot about his mum, her family and growing up in Shipley, Yorkshire, he had litte information to share about his dad. He seemed reluctant to talk about his father saying he hardly knew him because he was away a lot with the Army. I also remember dad saying that the family’s, of both his mother and father, never “got along”.

My search for this “Mysterious Musician”, my Grandfather, began with a copy of the Marriage Certificate which both confirmed and confused. The best clue was the recording of his profession as “Private 2nd Dragoon Guards”. It didn’t take long to discover that the Regimental Band of the 2nd Dragoon Guards was stationed at Fulford, York, Yorkshire, England in 1899 which is the same year that he met and married my Grandmother, Marie Ogilvie a Yorkshire lass, in York. Henry (Harry) Eden Moody, whose name and his mother’s was changed to Crout on the 1891 Census, was born in Battersea, London, England on 21 March 1880.

How excited I was to see on-line, and to be able to purchase, a photo of the Band, taken that same year, despite knowing that none of the band members are named. However, I do have a description of Henry (Harry) Eden Crout taken from his “Attestation Papers” when he joined the “Canadian Expeditionary Force” on 20 July 1915. I keep trying to pick which of these strapping young blokes is my Grand-father, my “Mysterious Musician” but no luck. Maybe you can help?  He is 19 years old in the photo and described, 15 years later, as:

A Clarionet player, 5ft 7ins tall, dark complexion, brown eyes, black hair, girth when fully extended 36 ins (rate of expansion 2 1/2 inches). Three vaccination scars on left arm and 3 scars on right shoulder. A tattoo of a Heart and Arrow on left forearm and, on right forearm, a Cross and Anchor.”

 

Below is a picture of his son, Harry Scarborough Crout, at about same age.

Harry Scarborough Crout, riding pillion, aged 17 – 1929 (c) C.Crout-Habel

Harry Scarborough Crout aged 29years. (c) C.Crout-Habel

The Mysterious Mariners

Reading that my Grandfather had a Cross and Anchor tattoo, which I later discovered is a “Maritime Cross”, flipped me right back to that Marriage Certificate. Not only does he incorrectly name himself, and his father as Harry Edward Crout when both were Henry Eden Crout but also wrongly claimed his father to be a “Retired Seaman”. What is going on here?… thinks I. Many hours, days, weeks, months and now years of research are finally bringing the answers. He used his Grandfather’s name for himself and his dad, when marrying, and also his Grandfather’s profession. It is his Grandfather who is Henry Edward Crout (1814 – 1875) and he was indeed a Seaman, first going to sea at the age of 16.

The possible reasons my Grandfather gave mis-leading information is another story, for another day. Suffice to say their daughter, my dad’s sister Annie Ruby Crout, was born 22 Dec 1899 and just one month after they married. Soon after, he went off to the Boer War and I understand that the 2nd Dragoon Guards remained in South Africa for a further 8 years, as part of the occupying force. He was simply a Private. As I understand it, the Army would not accept responsibility for re-locating his wife, and child, because the Commanding Officer had not given permission for the marriage.

After answering a lot of questions, rattling round in my head, it was soon time to focus attention on the “Mysterious Mariners” … and what a revelation that’s been. The numbers keep growing almost daily but, to date, I’ve located the following Seamen/ Mariners to be amongst my dad’s Ancestors.

Henry Edward Crout (1814-1875) Seaman, Merchant Navy (Great Grandfather)
John Thomas Crout (1772-1841) Master, Navy (Great Great Grandfather)
John Thomas Crout (1810-1859) Master, Navy (Great Uncle)
Frederick Orlando Crout (1822-1902) Master Mariner (Great Uncle)
Henry Edward Crout (1842-1912) Seaman, Navy (2nd cousin?)
Frederick Orlando Crout (1847-1930) Seaman living/working Wales (2nd cousin?)

So there you have it. A few of the discoveries I’ve made, so far, about my “Mysterious Musicians and Mariners”. When telling my daughter about this aspect of her Ancestry, her comment was “No wonder Grandad was such an Adventurer, mum”. 

If you have any thoughts on which of those likely young lads may be my Grandfather, I’d be delighted to hear them.

Cheers, Catherine

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Copyright © 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family”

“Rusty Buckles”

Henry (Harry) Eden Crout, my paternal grandfather, was a clarinet player in the 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen’s Bays), served in the 2nd Boer War and remained posted to South Africa for a total of 7 years, as part of the “occupying army”.

Marie, and their baby daughter Annie Ruby Crout, did not join him and I imagine this is because he most likely did not get his Colonel’s permission to marry.  In such cases the Army refused to accept responsibility for the soldier’s family. It’s a long time for a family to be apart which may explain later events.

For now, let’s listen to “Rusty Buckles”.  Why “Rusty Buckles”? … Well, you might ask 🙂 …

RUSTY BUCKLES

"Bays" Drum Horse - 1904

The regimental quick march of the Queen’s Bays (2nd Dragoon Guards). Published in 1952, it is a quickstep adaptation of the Regimental Slow March.
The regimental nickname-‘Rusty Buckles’- originated in the 18th century when at a parade shortly after the regiment returned to England from Ireland it had steel buckles on its saddlery and harness, whereas all other cavalry regiments had changed to brass. Steel buckles were liable to become rusty in wet or damp weather- hence the nickname. 
 

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(c) Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family