MUSICAL MONDAY: The Pub With No Beer

Pub-with-no-beerThe Pub With No Beer was written in 1943, during the second world war, by Dan Sheahan, an Irish cane cutter. The story is that he went to his favourite pub, the Day Dawn Hotel in Ingham, (northern Queensland) but was told by the Publican Gladys Harvey, that there was no beer left, due to a drinking binge by some black American soldiers the previous night. Consoling himself with a glass of wine, he sat down to write a poem called “A Pub without Beer.”

Ingham, North Queensland, Australia. Source: Wikipedia

Ingham, North Queensland, Australia. Source: Wikipedia

Dan Sheahan’s poem was later renamed “A Pub with No Beer” by Gordon Parsons, who made several changes to the lyrics and set it to music. The song made famous by the late Slim Dusty.

 

The Day Dawn Hotel has been replaced with Lee’s Hotel and a Commemoration Plaque records the origin of “The Pub With No Beer.”

pubwithnobeer. commemoration plaque

~~~~~~~~~

RESOURCES & FURTHER INFORMATION:

http://alldownunder.com/australian-music-songs/pub-with-no-beer.htm
http://www.ozatwar.com/locations/apubwithnobeer.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Pub_with_No_Beer
http://thepubwithnobeer.com.au/Since1875/The_Original_Pub_With_No_Beer.html
http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/tough-times-for-the-pub-with-no-beer-20110723-1hu1y.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzqjjxgHqqM

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Advertisements

Are Ye Right There Michael… are ye right?

Corofin Railway Station - County Clare, Ireland

Corofin Railway Station – County Clare, Ireland

Come take a little trip with me  through the West of County Clare, Ireland… the Homeland of my Great Great Grand-mother Susan Kelleher, to the accompaniment of Percy French’s rollicking tune; Are Ye Right There Michael… are ye right?

~~~~~~~~

Why not sing along?…

 

“Are Ye Right There Michael”
by Percy French (1902)

Ennis, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia
Ennis, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia

 

“You may talk of Columbus’s sailing,
Across the Atlantic sea
But he never tried to go railing,
From Ennis as far as Kilkee.

You run for the train in the morning,
The excursion train starting at eight.
You’re there when the guard gives the warning,
And there for an hour you’ll wait.

And while you’re waiting in the train,
You’ll hear the guard sing this refrain:

Are ye right there, Michael, are ye right?
Do you think that we’ll be home before the night?
Ye’ve been so long in startin’,
That ye couldn’t say for certain’
Still ye might now, Michael,
So ye might!

Corofin, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia
Corofin, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia

They find out where the engine’s been hiding,
And it drags you to sweet Corofin;
Says the guard: Back her down on the siding,
There’s a

Kilrush, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia

Kilrush, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia

goods from Kilrush comin’ in.
Perhaps it comes in two hours,
Perhaps it breaks down on the way;
If it does, says the guard, be the powers,
We’re here for the rest of the day!

And while you sit and curse your luck,
The train backs down into a truck.

Are ye right there, Michael, are ye right?
Have ye got the parcel there for Mrs. White?
Ye haven’t, oh begorra,
Say it’s comin’ down tomorra –
And well it might now, Michael,
So it might!

Lahinch, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia

Lahinch, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia

At Lahinch the sea shines like a jewel,
With joy you are ready to shout,
When the stoker cries out: There’s no fuel,
And the fire is teetotally out.
But hand up that bit of a log there –
I’ll soon have ye out of the fix;
There’s fine clamp of turf in the bog there.
And the rest can go gatherin’ sticks

And while you’re breakin’ bits off trees,
You hear some wise remarks like these:

Are ye right there, Michael? Are ye right?
Do ye think that you can get the fire to light?
Oh, an hour you’ll require,
For the turf it might be drier,
Well it might now, Michael,
So it might!

Kilkee, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia
Kilkee, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia

Kilkee! Oh, ye’ll never get near it,
You’re in luck if the train brings you back.
For the permanent way is so queer, it
Spends most of its time off the track.
Uphill the oul’ engine is climbing,
As the passengers push with a will.
You’re in luck when you reach Ennistimon
For all the way home is downhill.

Ennistymon Waterfall, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia

Ennistymon Waterfall, County Clare. Source: Wikipedia

And as you’re wobbling through the dark,
You’ll hear someone make this remark:

Are ye right there, Michael? Are ye right?
Do you think that we’ll be there before it’s light?
Oh, it’s all depending whether,
The oul’ engine holds together,
But it might now, Michael,
So it might!”

~~~~~~~~~

 Thanks to  http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/site/lyrics/song_12.html  for the lyrics as well as the following information:

Percy French 1854-1920

Percy French 1854-1920

The Clare County Library writes: “In 1898 Percy French sued the directors of the West Clare Railway Company for “loss of earnings” when he and his troupe of entertainers were late for a performance in Moores Hall, Kilkee. He had advertised a concert for 8 p.m. on the evening of 10th August 1896, in Kilkee. He left Dublin that morning and arrived in Ennis on time for the 12.30 train which was due to reach Kilkee at 3.30p.m. The train slowed up approaching Miltown Malbay and when it got to the station there did not go any further. Five hours elapsed before a replacement train arrived and as a result he did not get to the hall in Kilkee until 8.20 p.m. His magic lantern, which was with his luggage, did not arrive until 9.00.

When he reached the hall most of the audience had gone home and the receipts were only £3 instead of the usual £14. A railway company official explained that when the engine took on water at Ennistymon weeds got into the boiler. This became apparent after a few miles and by the time Miltown Malbay was reached the driver decided to put out the fire because of the possibility of an explosion. No further progress was possible and a replacement engine was requested.

French was awarded £10 expenses. The Railway Company appealed but the award stood. The incident led to the song Are ye right there Michael? which became one of the most popular numbers in his repertoire.

~~~~~~~~~

Thankyou to the Clare County Library for the photo at the top of this page. To view many more wonderful photos of the  engines and railway stations of the West Clare Railway Line, held by the Library, please click HERE

For further information on Percy French just click on the following link: :  http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/people/percy.htm

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Merry Month of May – Music Meme

Some of my earliest childhood memories are of mum singing as she went about her daily work, always with a song on her lips and a tune in her heart.  So, it’s with great pleasure that I take up Pauline’s “Merry Month of May Music Meme”.

It’s been fun reflecting and writing about “My first live concert” and “Music to get married by” … now I’ll enjoy working through the entire list, proposed by Pauline, and then reading the reflections of others. 🙂

~~~~~~~~~

(1)   Song(s)/Music from your childhood: The Littlest Angel,  Little White Bull, Where Will The Baby’s Dimple Be?, Davy Crockett, Little Blue Coupe, Rawhide, Ghost Riders in the Sky, the Naughty Lady of Shady Lane.

(2)   Song(s)Music from your teenage years:Rock Around the Clock, Blue Suede Shoes, Jailhouse Rock, Little Bear, Peppermint Twist, Good Golly Miss Molly, Flaming Star, Wooden Heart, Coming Down With Love, Rock a Billy, Blowin’ in the Wind, Lemon Tree, We’re All Going on a Summer Holiday, and lots more… 

(3)   First live concert you attended: Johnny O’Keefe Show… The 2nd and last teenage concert I went to was the Beatles

(4)   Songs your parents sang along to:  Dad: only 2 that I remember.. “The Naughty Lady of Shady Lane & Cock of the North” (opening words only… when he played it on the piano). Mum sang all the time…  My favourite was “Hi Lilly Hi Lilly Hi Lo” which she sang so beautifully and with such feeling.   

 (5)   Song(s)/Music your grandparents sang/played: Don’t remember Grandpa ever singing but he used to whistle tunelessly through his teeth. My youngest son, who never knew my Grandfather, whistles EXACTLY like him 🙂  ~~~  Nana died when I was very young & only remember her being ill but mum used to tell me how Nana would rock my eldest brother to sleep, singing “What will we do with a Drunken Sailor” and one time she rocked so hard the chair, Nana & the baby ended up backwards on the floor.

(6)   Did your family have sing-a-longs at home or a neighbours: Mum used to buy copies of the “Boomerang Song Book” every time a new one came out and she and I would learn the words of all the new songs and sing to our hearts content.  Sometimes my brothers would join in. For years, every Christmas Eve, mum & I would sit out the front and sing Christmas Carols for hours.  My mum, my girlfriend and her mum (Margaret & Mrs Jordan) used to drive regularly from Adelaide to Mildura (to visit their “rellies’) and we’d sing all the way there and back.  My unanswered question still is: … what did “The Sergeant Major” DO after that second kiss???… they never would tell us but would just laugh their heads off …

(7)   Did you have a musical instrument at home:  Mum bought  a 2nd hand Pianola from a work colleague’s brother so I could learn to play and my brother who didn’t have the use of one arm could still be involved in the music making. She bought it on “Layby” and seemed to take forever for her to pay it off.  My eldest brother had a guitar. My youngest played piano and was very good at “Alley Cat”. Dad taught himself the Piano Accordian, mouth organ, piano. He used to play “the spoons” & graduated to a set of “bones” (yep real bones which I still have) Dad also made an apparatus for himself which would hold the Mouth Organ so he could play the Piano Accordian and the Mouth Organ at the same time…

(8)   What instruments do you play (if any): Piano very badly,  Irish Whistle reasonably OK… with tunes I know but takes a long while to learn them.  Bodhrán quite well and I love this best of all 🙂

(9)   What instruments do you wish you could play: Wish I could pay Piano & Irish Whistle properly…

(10)  Do do/did you play in a band or orchestra:  Used to play with “Celtic Music Club” which are a part of the “South Australian Irish Australian Association”. We’d play for a “Bush Dance” at club once a month, St Patricks Day and at various country festivals.  Also used to be one of the “musos” every Friday night at the Governor Hindmarsh Hotel.  It’s the companionship in the “making” of the music that’s the joy and I love the “protocols” when playing in such a group. e.g. who is permitted to initiate a tune etc…  

(11)  Do you/did you sing in a choir: Only at Primary School because I was forced to and used to get growled at for singing out of tune… so then I’d pretend to sing and get into trouble for that.  Was a bit of a no winner…

(12)  Music you fell in love to/with or were married to: “We’ll Build a World of Our Own” … also when hubby and I were first dating we went to see the movie “Dr Zhvago” and I loved “Lara’s Theme”. “My Guy” by Mary Wells – I used to go into the top room and play it REALLY loud at the time that mum was so critical of my boyfriend/ fiance who later became my husband.

(13)  Romantic music memories: A boyfriend was “lead guitarist” in a cover band for “The Shadows”.  My girlfriend’s boyfriend played “rhythm guitar”. We’d go to their concerts, sit at a table close to the band, carry their guitars & act very smug and superior when the other girls were “swooning”.  My excuse is that I was very young and I thought that was so so romantic. ha ha ha…

(14)  Favourite music genre(s): Folk Music, Country & Western, Celtic Music, Australian Bush Ballads.  I love the Bagpipes.

(15)  Favourite classical music:  Because I was a dancer… it’s Swan Lake, Giselle & Nutcracker Suite 

(16)  Favourite opera/light opera:  mmmhhh???

(17)  Favourite musical: Bye Bye Birdie, Cats, Jesus Christ Superstar

(18)  Favourite pop:  Don’t Worry Be Happy, Shuttupa ya Face, Pushbike Song,

(19)  Favourite world/ethnic: Celtic

(20)  Favourite jazz: Jazz does nothing for me at all

(21)  Favourite country or folk: So many it’s hard to pick but particularly like Johnny Cash; Ring of Fire, Walke the Line, Folsom Prison Blues. Also Peter, Paul & Mary… The Seekers

(22)  Favourite movie/show musical: South Pacific, Oklahoma, West Side Story,

(23)  Favourite sound tracks:  As above

(24)  What music do you like to dance to: Age & infirmity have curtailed my dancing but I’d dance to anything.   Earliest memory of music to dance to is “Sway”.  I was very tiny, dad would push back the kitchen table and he’d dance me around the highly polished lino floor with me standing on his feet.  This is how I learnt to dance. Mum & Dad were beautiful dancers.

(25)  What dances did you do as a teenager:  Started with jive and then moved with the trends… to the Twist, the Stomp etc. My three brothers & I would gather our friends & records and we’d regularly have “record parties” at various houses on a Saturday night. I used to wear out a pair of moccasins each night and it took hours to starch & iron the petticoats…  I also enjoyed “progressive dances” like “Military Two Step” and “Canadian ???” The “Duke of Erin” was another favourite but not many my age enjoyed those … and I also loved any sort of ballroom… the “old chaps” were the best to dance these with.  

(26)  Do you use music for caller ID on your mobile:  No

(27)  What songs do you use for caller ID:

(28)  What songs do your children like or listen to: Now they’re adult I can’t really say … as children “Aga Doo” was a particular favourite. Mr Clicketty Cane, Spaghetti Bolognaise, Alice the Camel .  Teenagers… Redgum, Uncanny Xmen, Cold Chisel, Abba were some of their favourites. My youngest Grandson adores “Celtic Thunder” and tells me Damien is his favourite.  Grandaughter is mad about “New Direction” … or is is “One Direction”??? … {chuckle}

(29)  Favourite live music concerts as an adult: Lord of the Dance, Cats

(30)  Silly music memories from your family:  Purple People Eater, A-hab the A-Rab, The Thing, The Battle of New Orleans, Itsy Bitsy Teen Weeny Yellow Polka Dot Bikini, My Old Man’s a Dustman, Does Your Chewing Gum Lose it’s Flavour on the Bedpost Overnight… are some of the tunes.  Silliest family fun thing was that we’d go to the “Drive-in Theatre” every Saturday and whilst waiting for it to get dark music would be played over the speakers. When “The Little Blue Coupe” was popular we used to take turns in beeping the car horn in time with “beep” in the lyrics. Loads of fun …

(31)  Silliest song you can think of: “The Thing” – just WHAT was it he found on the beach “that bright & sunny day” and couldn’t get rid of ??? …

(32)  Pet hate in music/singing:  None really, except neighbours playing really loud music early hours of the morning with “base” turned up SO high it makes my walls vibrate… grrr

(33)  A song that captures famiy history for you:  Bound for South Australia” and also “The Song of Australia”… then there are the songs like “Just a wee Deoch & Doras” which reflect my heritage.

(34)  If you could ony play 5 albumns (assume no iPolds or mp3) for the rest of your life what would they be: Songs of the Protest Era, Treasury of Australian Music (2 records), Hard Day’s Night, Oklahoma

(35)  Favourite artists (go ahead and list as many as you like):  Elvis Presley (but only in the early days), Roy Orbison, Petula Clerk, Rod Stewart, Abba, the Beatles, Dig Richards, Cliff Richard, Little Patty, Johnny O’Keefe, Cilla Black, Tommy Steele etc… 

Thanks Pauline… the remembering has been great fun.

~~~~~~~~~

Merry Month of May – Music to get married by

Some of my earliest childhood memories are of mum singing as she went about her daily work, always with a song on her lips and a tune in her heart. So it’s with great pleasure that  take up Pauline’s “Merry Month of May Music (& Melody) Meme”.

It’ll be fun retrieving memories and reflecting on how music and song has been, and continues to be, an important part of my life, especially when the going gets tough. It’s also an opportunity to share a little of my own life story with my beloved children, and grandchildren, and have fun doing it 🙂

~~~~~~~~~

The theme I’ve chosen today relates to the date, i.e.10 May 2012, which is  my 45th Wedding Anniversary and was prompted by Pauline’s suggestion of “Music you fell in love to/with or were married to”. 

I was 17years old and Steve was 16 when we met, fell in love and before long decided that a life together was what we wanted more than anything else in the world. Incidentally I’m now horrified at the thought of my 14 year old  Grandson making such a decision in a little over 2 years time, but that’s life, eh? … 

Not surprisingly neither sets of parents were happy, however they did agree to our Engagement, which happened on 27 Apr 1966, and it wasn’t until plans were well under way for the Wedding to take place the following Dec 12, that first one set of parents withdrew permission and then the other. Then the first changed their minds but the second continued with their refusal. It was like being on an emotional roller coaster.

At that time you could only marry under the age of 21 with the approval of parents or a Judge and Court Order… so, we eloped. Steve joined the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and, after basic training at Edinburgh Air Base, South Australia, was posted to Wagga Wagga, New South Wales. I followed him, lived in the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), gained employment as Secretary to the OC (Officer Commanding) at the Base and we applied to the Court for permission to marry.

It was all very romantic and my favourite song, at the time, was “We’ll Build a World of our Own” by the “Seekers”.

Sadly the marriage ended after 20 years, almost to the day, and the following song personifies this.

Life is full of ups and downs, happiness and sadness, joy and pain and so it was with our marriage.  Without the pain you can not know the joy and it’s the happy times, the fun, laughter and especially our beautiful children, and now grandchildren, which remains with me and continues to enrich my daily life.  Thanks Steve.

~~~~~~~~~

Let's go Merry Month of May-ing

Let’s go a Merry Month of May-ing

 Copyright © 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Merry Month of May – My first live concert

Some of my earliest childhood memories are of mum singing as she went about her daily work, always wth a song on her lips and a tune in her heart. So it’s with great pleasure that I take up Pauline’s “Merry Month of May Music (& Melody) Meme”.

It’ll be fun retrieving memories and reflecting on how music and song has been, and continues to be, and important part of my life especially when the going gets tough.

“Fun & Frivolity” is the name of the game… so why not join in and do it your way… Oooh… am I channeling Frank Sinatra now? 🙂

~~~~~~~~~

Looking through the list of suggestions, “No3 – First live concert you attended” pops out at me as Johnny O’Keefe and the Delltones flash before my eyes, “SHOUT!” rings in my ears along with the screams of hundreds of teenage girls. Technically speaking it was not my first live concert but all those chidren’s shows paed into insignificance when “The Wild One”, Johnny O’Keefe, came to town.

It would have been about 1960, I was in the early years of High School and only allowed to attend the “Johnny O’Keefe Show”, at Centennial Hall, Adelaide, South Australia because my eldest brother, Ken, was chaperoning. So, so exciting!  The memory is indelibly imprinted on my brain.
 
     *  Girls were crying, screaming and fainting.
     *  The noise shook the walls.
     *  Police officers patrolled the front of the stage.
     *  “The Wild One” unbuttoned and flung back his black coat, showing 
         the red lining, and the screaming was ear shattering.
     *  I cried with happiness.
     *  My brother was grumpy ‘cos he couldn’t hear a word.

These were the early days of “JO’K” when he was still quite “wild”, by the standards of the day.  As his TV career took off, with shows such as “Six O’Clock Rock” & the “Johnny O’Keefe Show” he quietened down somewhat, even when he was singing “Shout”.  Am glad I got to see Johnny when he was still rather “naughty” 🙂

Choosing a favourite song to share was not easy.  “She’s My Baby” came runner-up simply because this version of “Shout” truly represents that memorable night of my first “adult” live show.

Here’s Australia’s “Wild Child” of the 1960’s for your entertainment and amusement… enjoy.

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel.  Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Let's go Merry Month of May-ing

Let’s go Merry Month of May-ing

The ANZACS and the Vietnam War

In the early 1960’s the South Vietnamese government was beset with problems.  It was under threat from a growing communist insurgency and sought assistance from the United States and her regional ally, Australia.  This support for Vietnam was in keeping with the policies of many other nations, to stem the spread of communism in Europe and Asia, with the fear that if one country “fell” to communism then others would swifty follow – referred to as “the Domino effect”.

Australia initially responded with 30 military advisers.  They arrived in South Vietnam during July and August 1962 and a proclamation, issued by the Governor-General on 11 Jan 1973, formally declared an end to Australia’s participation in the War.  Australia’s military involvement in the Vietnam War was the longest in duration of any war in Australia’s history.  From the time of the arrival of the first members of the Advisory Team almost 60,000 Australians, incuding ground troops and air force and navy personnel, served in Vietnam; 521 died as a result of the war and over 3,000 were wounded.

The war was the cause of the greatest social and political dissent in Australia since the conscription referendums of the First World War. In 1964, two years after entering Vietnam, compulsory National Service was introduced.  The scheme was based on a birthday ballot for 20-year-old- men who were to perform two years’ continuous full time service in the Regular Army Supplement, followed by three years’ part-time service in the Regular Army Reserve.  The full-time service requirement was reduced to eighteen months in 1971. 

 Protesters and those refusing to register, or refusing to serve if called up were jailed.  Public outrage intensified when, in May 1965, one year after the commencement of National Service the Australian Defence Act was amended to provide that National Servicemen could be obliged to serve overseas, a provision that had been applied only once before – during World War II.   Lobby groups were set up to fight for its repeal as well as the removal of Australian troops from Vietnam. Organisations, such as “Save Our Sons”, held protests across the country and handed out anti- conscription leaflets.  A major rally involving “Save Our Sons”, and other anti-war groups, was held when US President Lyndon B. Johnston visited Australia in 1966 with crowds of protestors chanting,

“LBJ, LBJ, how many kids did you kill today?”

During that rally a now famous line was uttered when the driver of the car carrying Johnston and New South Wales Premier Askin asked what he should do as the crowd was blocking the road.

“Run over the bastards” was Askin’s response.

Australian Defence Medal

Conscription ended as one of the first acts of the newly elected Whitlam Labor Government in late 1972. About 63,735 National Servicemen served in the military from 1964-1972.  Of that number, 19,450 served in Vietnam, all with the Army.

 

 

Anniversary of National Service Medal

In 2002 National Servicemen, or “NASHOS” as they came to be known, were eventually recognised for their service with the “Australian Defence Medal”and the “Anniversary of National Service 1951-1972 Medal”. 

     

 

 

I was a teenager throughout this turbulent period in Australia’s history. Furthermore, it was my brothers, their friends, their friends’ brothers, my schoolfriends, cousins, etc., who were threatened by the infamous “lottery” – of having their names “drawn” and being sent off to the horror that was the Vietnam War when little more than children. Some managed to dodge it, some were unlucky, some didn’t come back and some came back maimed in body, mind and spirit.  
~~~~~~~~~

SOURCES:  http://www.vietnam-war.commemoration.gov.au
                     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conscription_in_Australia
                     http://www.awm.gov.au/atwar/vietnam.asp

Copyright (c) 2012 Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family                      

Hot Cross Buns

Hot cross buns!
Hot cross buns!
One a penny, two a penny,
Hot Cross buns!

Hot cross buns!
Hot Cross buns!
If you have no daughters,
Give them to your sons!
One a penny two a penny,
Hot Cross buns!

Hot cross buns!
Hot cross buns!
If you haven’t got a penny
A ha’penny will do.
If you haven’t got a ha’penny,
Then God bless you.

~~~~~~~~~

This familiar old nursery rhyme comes from the call of the street vendors who sold them.

Happy Birthday Mum…

Dedicating this to my beautiful mum, Kathleen Mary (Allan) Crout, on this …  the 87th Anniversary of her birth.  Love ya mum xxx

Thankyou Dick Eastman for featuring this song your blog and Kelly Leary for telling him about it.
http://bbg.eogn.com

A Wee Deoch an Doris


One of my dad’s favourite songs through which he linked to his Scottish Identity.

Harry Scarborough Crout, from Leeds, Yorkshire, England, loved to challenged his Ozzie children to repeat the following words as quickly as they could:

“If ye can say it’s a braugh bricht moonlicht nicht t’nicht then ye alricht ye ken…”

Could we ever beat him? … ha ha ha …