It’s a day

Today is the 6th of July, 2016. Two years ago my Mum, Catherine, the owner and creator of this blog was taken from us. Almost a year has passed since my last blog when we were in the UK. An amazing, special time.

I have hardly even visited the blog in this last year.

I have been busy finding my way in my new life, without my Mum. I navigated my way through losing a friend who had a 12 year battle with melanoma in April 2015. Then I stumbled my way through losing my oldest and dearest friend, Stacey, who had a five year battle with breast cancer in September 2015. I managed to get through both of them without Mum. Amazing what you can do, when you have no choice.

I’m doing ok, my son is now 11, I was able to move him to a school which is a much more positive place for him to be. I’m sure that would have been handled much better if Mum was here, but we got through it.  I have finally managed to get him keen on reading. The library is now a favourite place for him to go and I am delighted to see that he has discovered a series which he loves and is spending every spare moment buried in it. I know Mum would be clapping her hands with joy and sharing her love of books with him.

I have become a much easier person to live with than I was when I first lost Mum. Grief was very hard and I was so unhappy and stressed and emotional. Thank God I have an amazing husband who with the assistance of my wonderful grief councillor gave me the space and understanding to find my way.

Today I knew was going to be hard. I was prepared for it, which I’ve decided I need to be more often. I need to plan to give myself space to grieve, and then it’s likely I’ll actually cope with the day better than I expect. I spent a few wonderful hours with my Big Brother last night. In anticipation of having a hard time today and wanting to connect with him – the closest link I have to my Mum. He flew to Singapore for work today, so seeng him today wasn’t possible, but we managed to squeeze in dinner and drinks  last night.

I was talking with him about why I find anniversaries, birthdays, Mothers Days and other special dates so hard. Mothers Day this year was particularly hard. I had told myself and everyone around me I was fine and then I woke up and I was in a big, dark hole. Horrid. I wasn’t ready, it snuck up on me and it sucked. Big Time. I realised that those times are the days that I really stop and think about Mum and how much things are different now. How different I am now, and that makes me really sad.  I now feel like I don’t have somewhere else to go when things get really tough. I would always go to Mum. She was always there with a warm hug, soothing words, a cup of coffee and would help me put a plan together and gather the strength I needed to re-enter the real world. No longer do I have that safe haven, that soft place to fall and gather myself and my strength.

Of course I still have people to go to – my Husband, my Son, my friends and I have my Big Brother. Thank God for my Big Brother. I honestly don’t know what I would have done over these two years without him.  He provides a different safe haven to that which Mum gave me, but I love the fact that Cullen is so much like Mum in different ways to me. Our relationship is different to that which I had with Mum, and different to how our relationship was before Mum died. Back then we really didn’t understand each other, and now we share the fact that we are navigating our way through without Mum and realising that has had a profound effect on us. I feel like he has taken  over from Mum in being able to know when things aren’t right with me and he picks up the phone just to chat. Sometimes I don’t even realise what is coming – the tidal wave of grief, before he calls. I am so grateful for him, and I know he is of me.  When we left each other last night, his parting words about today were “It’s a day”.  He meant it in the way of today being a big day – hence the title of the post.

So this morning I was exhausted – I slept all morning and then felt like I was in a numb dazed state. I decided I needed to achieve something meaningful from the day, so I took myself off to Nalty Memorisls and organised Mum’s headstone. I’ve been meaning to for months, actually more than a year, but the time hasn’t been right. Today, everything fell in to place, and the deposit has been paid, the shape and design of the headstone set, and all I need to do is provide the text – that’s the easy part. I’m really pleased. It,s going to be amazing and then every time I visit the cemetery (which I don’t do all that often) I will be so proud of the headstone and the statement it makes about Mum and who she was, and what she meant to us.

The other thing I wanted to do was write a blog post, so this is my second accomplishment of the day.

Tomorrow I will wake up and it will be over two years since my Mum died. I’ll be in to the next phase. For now I’m happy to have quietly seen the day through, and ticked a couple of boxes.

We are headed off for a week in sunny Cairns on Saturday to spend with my Dad, which should be a nice getaway. I look forward to feeling warm. It’s been so bloody cold lately.

Then I will prepare to mark the one year anniversary of Stacey’s death in September and will be very pleased to post photos of Mum’s headstone here, when it’s complete.

I hope all of you here reading this today still remember my Mum often and with love. You all meant so much to her.

Until next time,

Kirrily

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LEAVE OUR ANCESTORS ALONE!!! …

Memorials ready to be crushed for roadworks. Karakatta Cemetery, WAustralia

Memorials ready to be crushed for roadworks. Karakatta Cemetery, WAustralia

Is anyone out there maybe suggesting that I’m “obsessive”?

I confess, I give up… I am

Regular readers would no doubt remember my outrage at the “re-cycling” of cemetery plots here in South Australia and the horror at the very likely possibility that my precious Great Grandmother would be dug up.  You can read about it HERE

My next post was full of excitement as I explained that the South Australian Govern-ment had just released a “Draft Burial and Cremation 2012” Bill was and asking for comments, and suggestions, from the general public and not just from those with an invested interest.On accessing the Draft Bill my head was turned inside out with the “legalese” but plodded on and so posted “Shortcuts for Commenting” to give a bit of a “leg up” to anyone else thinking of putting in a submission.

My final post expressed both surprise, and delight, in having managed to completed this somewhat onerous task and offered to email copies of my submission, if requested.

The good news is that the new “South Australian Burial and Cremation” Bill has now passed it’s “2nd reading” in the House of Assembly with the next debate in just a few days time, Tuesday 5 Mar 2013.  Fingers crossed that we may finally have some effective legal protection for our Ancestors, their remains, their gravesites and memorials. Will post the outcome as soon as it comes to hand.

~~~~~~~~~

CrissouliSadly all this good news, and hopeful thinking, was somewhat shot down in flames just a few days ago when Crissouli on her Blog, That Moment in Time, alerted us to the wanton destruction and desecration of gravesites in Western Australia.  Please click HERE to read her post and  see many photos of exactly what is going on there.  It’s hard to believe that such beautiful and spiritual, stone monuments are being gathered up and crushed for “road works”, often without relatives being informed.

Published in the “Subiaco Post” on 1 May 2006 is Ms Allchurch’s horror, and continuing anguish,  on discovering that the joint grave of her much loved Great Grand-mother, Grandmother, Aunt and mother had been destroyed, despite written assurances from the Western Australian Metropolitan Cemeteries Board that she’d receive notification if any changes were proposed.

Cemetery desecration. Karakatta WA

Cemetery desecration. Karakatta WA.2.

Makes you feel helpless, doesn’t it.  Thanks to Sandra Playle there is a Petition you can sign to add your voice to the voices of others demanding that authorities STOP desecrating the final resting places of our Ancestors, destroying their monuments and discarding any physical memory of them just like so much flotsam and jetsam.

On 24 Feb 2013 Sandra wrote:

“By the MCB’s admission there is around 80% cremations so I fail to understand the reasoning for renewal. I have always advocated that the cemetery be:

(a) Closed for new graves.

(b) Open for burial in existing raves ie; family in with family to the limit of three as has been the practise.

(c) Open for cremations and the scattering/placement of ashes.

(d) If they must insist on new graves then the existing headstones stay insitu and the new ones are made SMALLER to fit in the area between. This would mean the surrounds would have to go from existing graves.”

Once upon a time, the general public had trouble making their collective voice heard but technology, and the “social media” has changed all that.  I urge you to sign the petitioon and pass the message on via any medium at your disposal: Facebook, Twitter, Google +, Pinterest etc.

You may think that Western Australia is much too far from you for your voice to make any difference, but it will, indeed it will.  International exposure can work wonders in this “Global Community” of ours and tomorrow it could be your Ancestor’s gravesite being destroyed, or you child, or your brother/ sister’s …

If you wish to sign the petition, just click HERE

Finally, I must share Crissouli’s beautiful poem which reaches into my very soul.

GRANDMA’S FOUNDATION

I went to visit Grandma
Her stone it wasn’t there
I thought I made an error
But I did look everywhere
It was then I noticed rubble
Right against the fence
And a dumpster full of rubbish
It really was quite dense.
Then I saw my Grandma’s name
As if she was calling me
“Please help me darling granddaughter
Will you please help me be free
For crushing is the next step
Road base they say they need
  I suspect that is just a cover up
It all comes down to greed.
The land here’s rather valuable
I heard the workmen say
My lovely stone you saved for
Will be destroyed today.”
(c) Crissouli

Memorials in the dumpster with all the rubbish and ready for crushing...

Memorials in the dumpster with all the rubbish and ready for crushing…

“Show me the manner in which a nation cares for its dead, and I will measure with mathematical exactness the tender mercies of its people their respect for the laws of the land and their loyalty to high deeds.” – William Gladstone

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Cc – is for Cousin Lizzie

FAMILY HISTORY THROUGH THE ALPHABET CHALLENGE

Cc was always going to be about cousins. I have a rather interesting bunch. Some I never knew existed, like the “Crout half-cousins” in Canada and the “Crout full-cousins” in the United States. Then there are the “Ogilvie cousins” I’m now in contact with via the internet; one still living in the “old country”, Leeds, England and his Uncle who migrated down here to the “antipodes” in the 1960’s. The seafaring “Hampshire Crout cousins” make an interesting read with a couple of “kissing cousins” thrown into the mix and there are the “Murray cousins”, here in South Australia, with whom I’ve just re-connected after near on 60 years.

However, it’s “Cousin Lizzie” who has “taken the yellow jersey” and for three reasons:

     *  The Last Will & Testament of my Susan features her prominently
     *  She’s been on my mind since writing about Baby Crout last week
     *  It’s become apparent that many relatives are not clear about where “Cousin Lizzie” fits into the family, nor what it is that made her “different/ special”

~~~~~~~~~

Cousin Lizzie is the Grand-daughter of Susan Kelleher and an integral part of my Family History.

On 13 May 1855 Susan, aged 18, arrived in South Australia from County Clare, Ireland, aboard the ill-fated “Nashwauk”. She and her sister, Bridget, took up service in the Mid-North of the state – the Clare Valley – and on 13 Jan 1856 Susan married Edward Nicholls.  They had three daughters;

Catherine Ann Nicholls – abt 1856
Mary Ann Nicholls – 29 Oct 1858 
Margaret Nicholls – 5 Aug 1860

Sadly Edward died of pneumonia, just 4 years after marrying, and is buried at his workplace, Bungaree Station, Clare, South Australia.

Bungaree Homestead – 1863

Four years after the death of Edward, Susan married Timothy Rowen at St Michaels Church, Clare, South Australia. They had 4 daughters and 1 son;

Bridget Rowen – 22 Dec 1864
Eliza Jane Rowen – 1 May 1867
Andrew Rowen – 19 Feb 1870
Susan Rowen – 23 Jul 1872
Mary Ellen Rowen – 6 Oct 1874

I’m related through Susan and Timothy’s second daughter, Eliza Jane Rowen, who is my Great Grandmother. Cousin Lizzie is from Susan’s first marriage to Edward Nicholls. Her mother is their youngest child, Margaret.

Only two of Susan’s three daughters, from her first marriage, survived childhood.  Their second daughter, Mary Ann died of “Heart Disease” on 12 Sep 1874, aged 15, just one month before her mother gave birth to the youngest child, Mary Ellen. Their eldest daughter, Catherine Ann, married William Walsh. They had 5 children, 4 survived childhood and went on to create a long line of Walsh/Nicholls descendants.

By all accounts Cousin Lizzie’s mother, Margaret Nicholls, had a sad and traumatic life. On 9 Mar 1875 , at the age of 15, Margaret was the plaintiff in a Court Case against her step-father Timothy Rowen. My Grandmother, Eliza Jane Rowen, was just 8 years old and a witness. The “Northern Argus, March 23, 1875” reports,

“Timothy Rewin (sic), who was indicted of an offence against the person at Armagh, on February 7, pleaded not guilty, and as the evidence of the prosecutrix did not agree with the medical testimony, the jury were directed to acquit the prisoner which was accordingly done.”

 The court document reads,

“Plea Not Guilty – Verdict by direction of His Hon. the Chief Justice, Not Guilty”.

It seems that, after the Court Case, my Grandfather became estranged from the family. Their home at Armagh (outside of Clare) was sold and Susan moved, with her children, to Laura where they remained until 1887 when she moved to Broken Hill, New South Wales taking the youngest children with her. Over the years, many of the older children also settled in Broken Hill.

Shortly after Susan and the children moved to Laura her daughter, Margaret, married Scottish Immigrant, John William Tait, at St Johns Catholic Church, Laura, South Australia. Margaret and John had 5 children,

Catherine Jane Tait – 25 Jul 1880
Elizabeth Ann (Cousin Lizzie) Tait – 10 Jul 1882
John Edward Tait – 29 Aug 1884
Agnes Melinda Tait – 12 Oct 1886
Margaret Ellen Tait – 19 May 1889

Only Cousin Lizzie and her sisters, Catherine Jane and Margaret Ellen, survived childhood. John died at the age of 18 months and Agnes when she was 6.

Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia

As all of their children were born at Laura, it seems that Margaret and John continued to live there until 1889-1892 when they moved to Broken Hill. I believe they moved to “the Silver City” because this is where Agnes Melinda died but this needs to be verified as they may have been visiting her mother/ family at the time.

What happened next in Cousin Lizzie’s life is open to conjecture. She would have been about 7-10 years old when the family re-settled and it seems her life would have been quite difficult for, on 17 Mar 1989, my mother wrote,

“… They had a daughter named Elizabeth but who within the family was always called “Cousin Lizzie”. She was rather deaf but understood if you spoke loudly. I rather think she lip-read, she had a speech impediment due to the mid-wife who delivered her deciding to snip under her tongue believing other-wise the baby would be tongue-tied. (this practice I believe was not unusual in those days)”

To read about “ankytoglossia”, the problems it can cause and the ways in which it’s treated, even today, just click here.

Mum talked, and wrote, about how it was said that Cousin Lizzie’s father rejected her because of this impediment. Also that he deserted the family and divorced Cousin Lizzie’s mother who then took her own life. I was told how Susan took custody of her Grand-daughter, caring for, loving her and leaving her well provided for so she would never be “without a roof over her head.”

Aware that there are always “two sides” to any story, I’m always reluctant to pass on negative “family stories”  but this one needs to be told, given the contents of Susan Rowen’s “Last Will & Testament” which arrived in my “Dropbox” just last week. Susan did indeed leave all her worldly goods to her Grand-daughter and makes it very clear that she had “issue” with Cousin Lizzie’s father when she writes that the legacy is,

“… for her use and benefit absolutely and I desire that she shall have no dealings whatever with her father or sisters, and if the said Elizabeth Ann Tait cannot make her home with her Aunt Susan I desire that she be placed in a Catholic Home in Adelaide. I want a quiet respectable burial.”

Cousin Lizzie did go on living with Aunt Susan for many years after her Grandmother’s death. They arranged her gravesite memorial and, I have it on good authority, they both continued to tend Susan Kelleher Nicholls Rowen’s grave, in the Broken Hill Cemetery, for many years to come …  along with Aunt Susan’s daughter, Ann.

I have yet to discover when Aunt Susan died and when Cousin Lizzie moved from Broken Hill to the Port Adelaide district, in South Australia. What I do know is that she was a strong minded woman, living on her own means and in her own home at 6 Denman Place, Exeter in April 1934 because this is when my dad and his first wife, Connie, were living with her. My understanding is that she continued to lived contentedly and independently, with family nearby, until her death at the age of 60 on 15 May 1943 in South Australia.

Although Cousin Lizzie faced many challenges, especially as a young child, she certainly was not a “dunce” or a “dummy”, as many seem to think. It appears that her father did indeed have difficulty coming to terms with his second daughter’s “impediments” but her mother’s family gathered her to themselves … loving, caring and supporting her till the end of her days.

Elizabeth Ann Tait’s feelings for her Grandmother are very clear in the Memorium Notices she placed in newspapers, both in Broken Hill and Adelaide, for many years. The notice below is but one example.

Barrier Miner- 9 April 1934, page 2

 MEMORIAM

ROWEN – In loving memory of my
dear grandmother, Susan Rowen, 
who passed away on April 9, 1922, at
Broken Hill.

Always deep down in my heart,
Where love burns bright and true;
There’s a light that will burn forever,
In memory, dear grandmother of you.

Inserted by her loving grand
daughter L.Tait 
~~~~~~~~~ 

FURTHER RESOURCES: http://www.trove.nla.gov.au

Copyright (c) 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Bb – is for Baby Crout

FAMILY HISTORY THROUGH THE ALPHABET CHALLENGE

It’s a crisp Autumn morning in Adelaide, South Australia and I wake with the memory of “Baby Crout” nudging through my sleep be-fuddled brain.  No more dithering, no more doubting, no more questioning for clearly “the little man” is the Bb for my “Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge”. His story is rather sad, as are many, but always reminds me of the care and com-passion which so often resides in the hearts of strangers.

~~~~~~~~~

Over 41 years ago, through the anguish and confusion of my baby boy’s unexpected death, I glimpsed a side of my father never seen before. He was grief stricken and inconsolable. Many years later, when mum told me the story of “Baby Crout”, I understood.

It was April 1934 and the “Great Depression” continued to cause great hardship but Harry Scarborough Crout and Constance Elsie Evans, married 13 Jul the previous year, were eagerly awaiting the birth of their first child – a new life, a new beginning and re-newed hope for the future. Connie, sufferring from “pre-eclampsia”, was being treated by Dr Porter at the Port Adelaide Casualty, which was the only medical care available to the wife of a long term unemployed worker when, on the 21st April she went into labour and was delivered of a stillborn baby boy at the Queen’s Home, Rose Park, South Australia.

Harry Crout, riding pillion, with Sammy – NSW 1929. Copyright (c) C.Crout-Habel

Mum was ony 9 years old, Connie, her beloved half-sister, was 20 and Dad had just turned 22 when this tragedy struck. He’d only been in Australia for 6 years and most of this was spent in New South Wales, or “humping the bluey” around this wide brown land and sometimes “jumping the rattlers” and/or coastal steamers searching for work and to avoid being sent to a “work camp” in the bush. 

The Queen’s Home – 1914

So, as he was leaving the hospital and the nurse handed him a shoebox telling him to  “take it to West Terrace” he had no idea of the significance of those words. Trudging the 14kms home to 6 Denman Street, Exeter, where they were living with “Cousin Lizzie” she certainly knew the significance of the shoebox dad had placed on the kitchen table and put out the call, “Get Fred!”… Grandpa, Connie’s loved Step- father, harnessed the horse & buggy and took Dad and “Baby Crout” to the West Terrace Cemetery where our precious little boy was interred in a “pauper’s mass grave”, under the name “Baby Crout”. To add to Dad grief his beloved wife took her own life, in an excrutiating way two months later, by swallowing Lysol.

No doubt the unexpected death of his baby Grandson, Jarren Vaughan Habel, 36 years later brought many of those horrific memories flooding back.

Sunday Mail, 10 April 1934

Mum and I often lamented that “Baby Crout” had no grave or memorial then, one day in 1995, there was the newspaper article – Mr David McGowan, the West Terrace Cemetery Manager, announced the creation of a “Baby Memorial”,

“…to acknowledge the 30,000 children who died at birth, or soon after, and their parents who grieved in silence for so long.”    

Following the instructions, I soon located “Baby Crout’s” burial site at “Cemetery Extension, Path 4, Plot 6”. The “Cemetery Extension” a field at the rear of the cemetery which had been used as a site for mass graves from the 1920’s up to the 1980’s. This link will take you to the West Terrace Cemetery website where you can access the map, view the position of the “Baby Memorial” and the Photo Gallery. The mass burial site (Cemetery Extension) is marked “Road 5”, adjacent to the “Light Oval A.I.F.” 

On Thursday 7 Mar 1996, at 7.30pm and assisted by Mr McGowan, I quietly laid a bronze leaf engraved;

BABY CROUT
21 April 1934
SON OF CONNIE (NEE EVANS) AND HARRY CROUT
CEM EXT. PATH 4. PLOT 6

Although invited to the Formal Dedication Ceremony, the following Sunday, I had no need to attend. My heart, and mum’s, were at peace knowing our little boy had been claimed and acknowledged. This “heart’s ease” was only possible because of the work of David McGowan, and his supporters who were distressed by over 30,000 little bodies who lay in the forgotten fields at West Terrace Cemetery. Below is his description of the Baby Memorial they created.

David McGowan assisting in the laying of a memorial leaf – 7 Mar 1966

Thankyou Mr David McGowan
~~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family  

The Silent Battlefield

“THE Australian soldier returned, he made it home to me:
Beyond the joy, the twinkling in his eyes I could not see;
His eyes were full of darkness, twinkling there was no more;
The man I loved had not returned, it was only the soldier that I saw;
So confident and so brave, but something had gone wrong;
He left himself behind in that battlefield all alone;
 Where is the man that I adore, for it is he I need;
Silent prayers have gone unanswered, please return to me;
I hold my breath and make a wish, for I know that he is trying;
Trying to leave his battlefield, a battlefield for the dying;
Waiting is what I will do, for eternity if need be,
Waiting for my love to return, return once more to me.”

KRYSTI NEALE, Kapooka, New South Wales, Australia
(born and raised in Semaphore, South Australia)

~~~~~~~~~

Published in:  “The (Adelaide) Advertiser“, Remembrance Day, 11 Nov 2011

Copyright © 2012 Catherine Crout-Habel  Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Tribute to our ANZAC Diggers

The First ANZAC Day – 15 Apr 1915

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall to weary them, nor the years condemn:
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
WE WILL REMEMBER THEM

~~~~~~~~~~

 
“Ode of Remembrance” –  “From the Fallen” (1914) by Laurence Binyon

For further information on the ANZAC Tradition see: “The one day of the year” 

Copyright © 2012 Catherine Crout-Habel.
Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Happy Birthday Jarren…

 Remembering Jarren Vaughan Habel

A Birthday Memorium for my beautiful baby boy Jarren Vaughan Habel.

Jarren Vaughan Habel, 3 days old

Born 13 Apr 1970 at Midland Hospital, Midland, Western Australia. Much loved second child of Catherine Ann (Crout) Habel and Stephen Louis Andrew Habel and adored by his big brother, Cullen Andrew. 

At the age of 6 weeks, Jarren contracted “measles“, passed on by the un-vaccinated child of one of his father’s work colleagues. Anti-biotics were administered immediately and he was soon back to his old self. However,

Jarren Vaughan & Cullen Andrew Habel - May 1970

within a week, or so, he developed a persistent “cold” which the doctor diagnosed as a “teething cold”. The doctor kept prescribing anti-biotics and one morning I was shocked to find Jarren dead in his cot.  As the cause of death was unknown an autopsy was held which showed my beautiful baby boy died of  “complications” from the measles. One entire lung had been destroyed and he had lived for all those months on ony half a lung.  We were told that it was only the anti-biotics which kept him alive and that, even if his persistent colds had been correctly diagnosed, he would have died anyway. Cold comfort indeed.

Jarren died at home, 16 Caladenia Way, Koongamia, Western Australia on 16 Sep 1970 at the age of 5 months and 3 days. His father had left for work and only his 3 year old brother, and I, were home.  Jarren seemed to be sleeping very late and as the time passed I began getting rather nervous so popped a piece of chocolate into my mouth to give some courage. Some wondered why I suddenly didn’t like the taste of chocolate any more.

Jarren was buried in a tiny little white coffin, decorated with golden angels, at Midland Cemetery, Midland, Western Australia.  All the way to the cemetery I kept looking for the hearse and was horrified when the “boot” of the car we were travelling in was opened and there he was.  Yes, the inside of the “boot” was decorated with velvet etc., but I was still horrified.

It rained continuously the morning of Jarren’s funeral and  the wildflowers,

Jarren, six weeks old, with mummy

lining the narrow country road, glistened with raindrops as though the world was crying with me as we drew closer and closer to the burial ground and the moment of final separation from my beautiful baby boy.  They lowered his tiny body in the tiny white coffin into the tiny hole in the ground and, consumed with grief, I turned my eyes to the heavens, the rain stopped, the clouds parted and the sun shone through with a blinding intensity that was other worldly – my life changed forever.

It’s been said that the death of a beloved child brings to the parents a pain which is indescribable.  It has been so for me.

My only consolation is to tell Jarren’s story and urge all who hear it to pass on the message that a parent choosing not to vaccinate against so-called “childhood illnesses” put the lives of the very young, who are unable to be vaccinated, at great risk.

May you always RIP, my darling.

~~~~~~~~~ 

© Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family  

Happy Birthday Mum…

Dedicating this to my beautiful mum, Kathleen Mary (Allan) Crout, on this …  the 87th Anniversary of her birth.  Love ya mum xxx

Thankyou Dick Eastman for featuring this song your blog and Kelly Leary for telling him about it.
http://bbg.eogn.com

Finding Christiana…

Ahhh… Christiana Ogilvie. We found you!!!
~~~~~~~~~

It’s such a joy to find a missing relative but the feelings that wash over me when finding a little child whose memory has become faded, or maybe even lost, in the mists of time are indescribable… and so it was when John and I found his Aunt, little Christiana.

John is my second cousin and Great Nephew of my Grandmother, Marie (Ogilvie) Crout.  Like Marie, he was born in Leeds, England but he migrated here to Australia, with his wife and family, in the mid 1960’s. We have only recently “found” each other through a joint interest in, and love of, Family History and it’s great fun to share our discoveries.  In a recent email he mentioned his mum saying that his dad had a sister who died as a child then shared her birth and death registration dates from his archives.

That was it and in no time, at all, we were off and away and soon found the relevant documents to put his Christiana Ogilvie firmly in her place on our shared Family Tree.

My Grandmother, Marie Ogilvie, was born the third of seven chilldren to Emma Chadwick and James Ogilvie in 1880, Leeds, England.  She had only two brothers and my cousin John’s Grandfather, also named John, was older than Marie by just three years.  I’m thinking they must have had warm feelings for each other as Marie had the honoured position as a witness at his Wedding when he married Lucy Ann Johnson in All Souls Church, Leeds, in 1897.

Buslingthorpe St Michael, Leeds, England

Later that year Lucy gave birth to their first child, a little girl, whom they named Christiana. The family were living at 4 Wharfdale Grove, Leeds on 27 Apr 1898, and John was working as a Leather Shaver, when Christiana was Baptised in St Michael Church, Buslingthorpe, Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Sadly little Christiana died in her first year of life and just a few months after being baptised. 

East Yorkshire Badge

John and Lucy went on to have another 7 children, four boys and three girls. Their fifth child, Jack, is the father of my 2nd Cousin, John, who is sharing this delightful journey of discovery with me.  John and Lucy’s last child, Doris, was just 17 months old when her father enlisted in the “6th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment“, British Army “Short Service” for the duration of WW1. 

Sadly John Ogilvie was killed in action in Flanders, France on 13 Mar 1918 and never did return to England and his family.  Lucy was both mother and father to their children continuing to live in the home they had shared at 16 Barkley Avenue, Leeds, until she passed away there on 2 Nov 1961, a much loved and honoured mother, grandmother and great grandmother. 

Christiana was named after her Great Grandmother, Christiana (MacKenzie) Ogilvie who married John Ogilvie in Elgin, Scotland.  They had four children; Alexander, James, Margaret (Maggie) and Jean.  James took on the trade of “currier”, moved to Leeds, married Emma Chadwick and named their first child, a girl, Christiana after his mother.   Their son, John, did the same.

I agree with Cousin John that the death of his Grandfather’s baby daughter is probably the reason “why the name of his grandmother never occurred again.”

Rest In Peace … little Christiana Ogilvie
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© Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family  

Tiny Red Roses …

Feelings of sadness wash over me whenever another tiny baby shows up, in the family history, as stillborn or dying at any early age.

So many little children who didn’t make it to adulthood …

So many mothers with grieving hearts and empty arms …

My own great grandmother, Eliza Jane (Rowan) Murray buried her first baby boy and then some 12 months later, after burying her  second baby boy, went back to her empty childless home. However, the thought of that endless rain pelting down on his fresh tiny grave sent her running back to the cemetery to cover his final resting place with his new baby blanket.

No one can tell me that mothers of yester-year were more accustomed to baby deaths and were therefore less affected than the mothers of today.

So, alongside each early death, in my family chart, I place a tiny red rose in love and remembrance.  

May these little souls forever Rest in Peace and may their mothers know that their babes are always remembered.  

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW: 1888-1954), Sat 18 Jan 1890, pg 3.

In Memory of:  Peter MURRAY 1887 – 23 Jan 1889 and Walter MURRAY 1889 – 14 Jan 1890 – Broken Hill Cemetery, Old Catholic Section: Row 3, Grave 5.

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SOURCE:  TROVE:  National Library of Australia   
                    http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article44045990

(c) Copyright 2012.  Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family