ANZAC DAY 2014

My British Grandfather, Henry (Harry) Eden Crout served with the “Canadian Expeditionary Force” in France, for the entirety of World War 1. He led the Regimental Band on the “Somme” and elsewhere in the collecting of bodies, burying the dead and sounding their “final salute”… too sad    😦
Will we ever stop the Warmongers, and their supporters, whom benefit from this carnage?

 

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Musical Monday: Wake up my mind…

Badge. No conscripts to VietnamGrowing up in South Australia with all the horror of my brothers, their friends and mine threatened with the dreaded “lottery”… which could see them conscripted, at the age of 19, to go fight in Vietnam gave me a perspective which you can read about here.

Young people, at that time, gave voice to their opposition of government decisions which severely impacted on their  lives through music and song.  My children grew up to the sounds of “Songs of the Protest Era”and right now I can’t get one particular song out of my mind, given the way our Australian political situation is playing out right now.

Here it is…  Songs of the Protest Era

Here is the entire collection:

Songs of the Protest Era.2

Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

TROVE TUESDAY: The Utopia of the South…

On South Australia‘s “birthday” last year, i.e. Proclamation Day,  I wrote about the origins of European settlement in this particular part of Australia. Not a convict settlement but a planned “Utopia of the South” which you can read HERE.

Another year gone, we’ve just commemorated our 177th Birthday/ Proclamation Day,  so I decided to trawl through TROVE to see how this occasion has been commemorated in days gone by.  I LOVE Trove…    😆

TROVE

In 1873, on the 37th Anniversary of the founding of the colony, the  South Australian Register reported: Banner. The Register

Proclamation Day 1873Proclamation Day 1873. 2

South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 – 1900), Tuesday 30 December 1873, page 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39302450

TROVE also delivered up many wonderful photos, from the State Library of South Australia, showing how this day has been celebrated in the past at Glenelg beach (the Bay), where the Proclamation was read when the first “settlers” arrived.

Proclamation Day 1912

Proclomation Day. on Glenelg jetty. 1913

Proclamation Day. refreshment booths near beack. 1921

Searching the 1873 newspapers around the rural area where my Susan settled shortly after arriving from Ireland, just 19 years after the Proclamation was read, there was not a mention of the celebrations which were clearly being enjoyed elsewhere. Seems it was simply “business as usual”.   I wonder why???…

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Copyright © 2013.  Catherine Ann Crout-Habel.

Honouring our “Diggers”… can you help?

A request has come in which I’m most happy to pass on. Good luck with your research Tony Wege and I look forward to reading your book.

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2/4th RESERVE MOTOR TRANSPORT COMPANY

Is there anyone in Victoria, SA and WA who has any connection with the 2/AIF unit, the 2/4th Reserve Motor Transport Company?

This unit served in Malaya and Singapore from April 1941 until the fall of Singapore. Then most of its members became PoWs  (Prisoners of War). Some returned to Australia.

National Collection

I am researching and writing the unit’s history. It was raised in Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia in the period late February and March 1941. The whole unit left Fremantle on the 19th April 1941 for Singapore.

I am anxious to talk with anyone who has a connection with any member of the unit.

I can be contacted on 08 85622257 or email: wege@internode.on.net.
If anyone would care to write, please send your letter to Tony Wege. PO Box 408 Nuriootpa SA 5355

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Thankyou to the Australian War Memorial for the photo of surviving 2/4th Reserve Motor Transport Company PoWs returning to Australia….
http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/117866/

Maritime Monday: Good News on the Nashwauk Anchor

nashwauk anchorAt long last the process to put the Nashwauk Anchor back on public display has commenced and I sure am smilin’…

The City of Onkaparinga,South Australia  is taking it to public consultation and is seeking feedback which you can be a part of, regardless of where you live. However there is a tight time frame and the cut off date is, Friday 3 May 2013 but just click HERE for a link to quickly and easily provide your feedback online.

This would be of particular interest to those with Irish heritage and especially if their Ancestors were upon this ill-fated Immigrant ship when it was foundered and then sank off the coast of Moana, South Australia, taking all their worldly goods with it.   Information of the history of the “Nashwauk Anchor”, and the sites proposed for it’s re-location, is provided below.

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Many would remember my post of 12 months ago where I described the sinking of this immigrant ship on which my 18 year old Great Great Grandmother, Susan Kelleher, travelled from County Clare, Ireland to make a new life in South Australia. Susan and her sister Bridget were among the 207 single Irish girls who boarded this “bride ship” in Liverpool, UK which, after a three month journey, made its made its way up the Gulf St Vincent toward its final destination, Port Adelaide, South Australia. It had been an uneventful voyage and was a dark, but clear, moonlit night when at 4am the watch changed, clouds obscured the coast and the “Nashwauk” was wrecked adjacent to Harriott’s Creek (Pedler’s Creek) at the mouth of the Onkaparinga River, some 40 miles short of it’s destination.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Childhood stories of the shipwreck, the girls being carried ashore on the sailors backs and especially our family visits to the Nashwauk Anchor, whetted my appetite for researching all aspects of family.

Mum, my brothers and I with our car and caravan in the background. Circa 1954. Copyright(c)2012.Catherine Crout-Habel

Mum, my brothers and I with our car and caravan in the background. Circa 1954. Copyright(c)2012.Catherine Crout-Habel

It was a sad day when, preparing to take my own children to visit their Great Great Great Grandmother’s Anchor, it was not to be found…  No longer was it standing proudly and majestically on the foreshore adjacent to where the ship foundered and then broke apart, taking all of my Susan’s belongings with it.  Also gone was the Moana Roundhouse which kept the Anchor company during its constant vigil as well as providing us with yummy icecreams and ice cold cool drinks on those hot summer days.

Nashwauk.moana_beach_roundhouse_4

Sadly the Roundhouse is gone forever..  It was the first building erected in Moana. The stone laid on 19Nov1927 and this iconic building was demolished in 2006. To read about this sad event and view some irreplaceable photographs please click HERE. (please note: 2 days ago this links was working and now it’s not. I’ll leave it here for a while and see if it fixes itself)  🙂 …

Fortunately the Nashwauk Anchor has survived and has been in the custody of what was once the “Moana Caravan Park” but has grown and is now the “Moana Beach Tourist Park”.  Although I was terribly disappointed that it had been reduced in stature, and no longer had a commanding presence, at least survived.  I’m sure that those who dragged it ashore 73 years after the ship went down and then set it on its high concrete plinth, overlooking the sea, would be most pleased that it has not been lost or abandoned.

Nashwauk Anchor. reward to recover

In 1927 the Noarlunga offerred a reward to recover the anchor and Mr Robinson, his brother, son and three horses successfully completed the task.

Nashwauk Anchor. laying on beach. The Mail. 27Aug1927. page1

“Mr. Robinson said that one day in about every two years the anchor of the Nashwauk used to become visible about 50 yards from the shore off Moana, and when, in May of this year, he noticed the anchor showing, he decided that he would en- deavor to reclaim it. With his brother and son and three horses he set about the task, and after five or six hours of strenuous effort was successful. The anchor of the Nashwauk is 11. ft. long and weighs several tons, but Lake Beach Estate, Limited, which is developing Moana, has decided to transport it another hundred yards, and set it upon a pedestal to remain a link with history for all time. A concrete base to take the huge anchor has already been constructed.”

The entire newspaper report can be read HERE.

Nashwauk Anchor before restoration

Nashwauk Anchor before restoration

So highly regarded is the Anchor that it was taken to Canberra by Dr Richard Reid, restored by the National Museum of Australia, and put on display (17 Mar 2011)as part of the “Not Just Ned – A true History of the Irish in Australia” Exhibition. The Australian National Geographic reported on the significance of this Anchor as an important part of our South Australian heritage:

“Women were sent out on government ships to work as domestic staff on the new colony and to redress the gender ratio. The exhibition will display an anchor from the Nashwauk, a ship wrecked off South Australia in 1855, carrying 207 of these young Irish women. They were carried from the waters on the shoulders of men who swam out to rescue them – and they all survived.”  

To read the entire Australian National Geographic article please click HERE 

Dr Richard Reid

Dr Richard Reid

It’s wonderful that this precious relic has been cleaned, restored and has taken pride of place in such and important Exhibition but my fear, which I wrote about HERE, was that it would never come back to its rightful home in South Australia. Well, its back home and ready to go on display. To read about the   “Not Just Ned – A True History of the Irish in Australia” exhibition, please click HERE.  Thankyou Dr Reid. All that’s needed is a decision about the location which you, the public, is invited to be a part of. The City of Onkaparinga has listed 3 Potential sites:
a)  Moana Tourist Park: approximate cost $4,000

The proposal was to return the anchor to the Moana Tourist Park and to have the anchor semi-enclosed in a recycled timber and galvanised iron structure which would give the anchor some protection from the environmental factors at the site. The cost of the structure and concrete plinth is approximately $4,000 but does not include any enclosed side panels on the structure. This site has existing lighting which will reduce costs associated with its display. This location would not address the concerns of some people in the community who have expressed an interest in the anchor being located in a more publicly accessible area.

Roadway leading down the side of the Moana Pioneers Memorial Hall to Moana Tourist Park

Roadway leading down the side of the Moana Pioneers Memorial Hall to Moana Tourist Park

b)  Nashwauk Reserve: approximate cost $4,000 – $15,000

There is existing developed open space that resides between the Moana Surf Lifesaving Club and the Moana Tourist Park. This reserve was developed several years ago as part of the Coast Park program. The anchor could be located as a feature within the reserve. This location would not have the passive surveillance that it previously enjoyed at the Tourist Park to assist with avoiding vandalism. The cost of the structure would be $4,000 for the same structure as is proposed in the Tourist Park but would be increased if side panels were added to the structure to protect it from the sea environment. Lighting of the structure and anchor would also increase costs. For an enclosed structure with lighting the cost would increase to approximately $15,000.

Nashwauk Reserve viewed from Nashwauk Crescent

Nashwauk Reserve viewed from Nashwauk Crescent

Nashwauk Reseve viewed from Moana Crescent

Nashwauk Reseve viewed from Moana Crescent

c)  Moana Pioneers memorial Hall approximate cost $4,000 – $15,000

There is sufficient area in the open space in front of the Moana Pioneers Memorial Hall to locate the anchor and this would also serve as an entry statement to the Coast Park area. The cost of the structure in this location would be as described in option (b) above, dependent on the nature of the structure.

Nashwauk Pioneers Memorial Hall

Nashwauk Pioneers Memorial Hall

The City of Onkaparinga has provided this “birds eye” view to help folks get their bearings.

Potential sites for the Nashwauk Anchor placement

Potential sites for the Nashwauk Anchor placement

However, thanks to the wonders of modern technology via Google Maps, you can go for a stroll down Nashwauk Crescent, Moana, South Australia towards the Esplanade and check out the sites for yourself.  Just click HERE to begin your journey at the round-about, with the road to the Moana Tourist Park (proposal a) on your left, the Pioneer Memoral Hall (proposal c) on the corner… and as you travel down to the seashore Nashwauk Reserve (proposal b) is on your left.  Enjoy…

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The managers of the Moana Tourist park left a message, about this matter, on my blog… click HERE to read in the comments section.  I phoned, we chatted and they took up my offer to publish their point of view which differs from mine, because we’re coming from a different perspective, but certainly is worthy of consideration before any decision is made. Thanks Daryl and Sandi-Kate. Their proposal is as follows:

Proposal for  relocating the
Nashwauk Anchor
from the
Moana Beach Tourist Park

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“As the current Managers of the Moana Beach Tourist Park, we would like to contribute to the community consultation process in regard to finding a new location to place the Nashwauk Anchor. There is debate about the length of time that the anchor has been displayed inside the Park, but it has been a significant number of years. During this time many a guest to the Park have taken photographs of their families with the Anchor, some of them repeatedly each time they visit. The anchor is a part of many guest’s childhood memories of summer holidays spent at the Tourist Park. Over the 12 months of 2012, we received a visit from 549 families that reside within the City of Onkaparinga. This accounts for over 30% of all reservations for the year, and demonstrates that the Park is accessed by a high proportion of local ratepayers who qualify to be part of this engagement process. The residents that live on the Park under a lease agreement are also used to the anchor being a part of their home environment, and some feel very connected to it and are prepared to put forward their ideas. Over the years, the Tourist Park has built an identity around the anchor, with it’s inclusion on the Logo and photographs on the Parks Facebook Page. We would like to continue marketing the Tourist Park with the anchor as our point of difference, as it gives a great impression of history and proximity to the beach. 

We understand completely the views of those who have ancestors that were on the Nashwauk when it went down. They should be able to visit and view the anchor easily, and would choose for it to remain close to the actual site where it occurred. 

Everyone shares the same concern for the safety of the anchor going forward, that it can be protected from the elements and also intentional damage caused by vandalism. 

Daryl and I would like to propose an alternative site to the current 3 choices under consideration. We would love to see the anchor displayed at the entrance to the Park within close proximity to the visitor car park and Nashwauk Crescent. This would be a compromise to address the concerns of those in the community who have already expressed an interest in the anchor being located in a more publicly accessible area, and also allow it to continue the passive surveillance from Park Management in an endeavour to avoid vandalism. This location would also be ideal to serve as an entry statement to the Coast Park area from the south, along Nashwauk Crescent, while also highlighting and identifying the entrance to the Park.

This proposal would tie in comfortably with the proposed future upgrade of the Tourist Park entrance area and/ or the sealing of the dustbowl that is a visitor car park that has been put forward as a Capital Works Project for several years running. The associated costs in choosing this location would still be in the same vicinity as the other 2 sites that have been proposed outside the confines of the Tourist Park.

As with any issue that is undertaken, either by City of Onkaparinga or Moana Beach Tourist Park, you will not be able to satisfy each and every person with an interest in the outcome. However we suggest that this site would at least address the issues raised thus far by interested parties, and could be viewed as a positive result for all stakeholders.

Best regards,
Daryl and Sandi-Kate Hutchins
Managers Christies Beach and Moana Beach Tourist Parks.

Nashwauk. Moana Beach Tourist Park. panorama

To access the Park’s Facebook page please click HERE

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My vision is to see the Nashwauk Anchor retured to its former glory before being removed from the foreshore, tucked away behind boom gates and removed from the public eye.  It would be wonderful to see it returned to serve the purpose envisaged by Lake Beach Estate, Limited, which developed Moana when, in 1927, it set it upon a pedestal on the foreshore for it to remain a link with history for all time.

I envisage a future where exciting public events, celebrating this important aspect of our South Australian heritage, are held on Nashwauk Reserve… especially during May, which is South Australian History Month and also the same month the “Nashwauk” foundered and was torn apart by the stormy seas.

The 160th Anniversary of the shipwreck is only 2 years away – 13 May 2015–  and is a perfect time to proudly showcase Moana Beach, and its environs, pulling in tourists from far away just as the summer season is coming to a close.

For these reasons, of the 3 Potential sites, my choice has to be Option b) the Nashwauk Reserve. However, like the Management of the Park, I have an alternative, and preferred site, which is right there at the corner of Nashwauk Crescent and the Esplanade… overlooking the sea, close to the Life Saving Club and the Australian flag. Family picnics, fetes and history festivals could be held on the Nashwauk Reserve with the Nashwauk Anchor in full sight.

The view along Nashwauk Crescent

The view along Nashwauk Crescent

Corner of Nashwauk Crescent and the Esplanade

Corner of Nashwauk Crescent and the Esplanade

Just imagine swinging around the corner of Nashwauk Crescent, travelling past the Pioneer Memorial Hall, and being drawn towards the beachfront by the stately majesty of this iconic piece of South Australian History… and to see it floodlit at night would add to its magnificence.

This position is more central and protected than the reserve as it is close to the Lifesaving Club, the car park and with buildings on this corner of the Esplanade. If the Lifesaving Club has security cameras, this would be an advantage… if not, installing them would provide extra protection for both structures. If funding is an issue, maybe other organisations would be willing to contribute a little to help offset the cost… after all it is a State Heritage item.

These are my thoughts and I hope the City of Onkaparing gives them due consideration.  Your view may differ, and that’s OK…  remember that the cut off date is Friday 3 May 2013 which is not far away.  Just click HERE and you can download a hard copy of the form to provide feedback, or fill in an online survey.

On Saturday, January 26, 1929 – Australia Day… The Adelaide Newspaper “The News” featured a magnificent photo of the “Nashwauk Anchor” mounted high on its pedestal on the foreshore and the caption read:

                 MOANA BEACH LANDMARK

This old anchor has been mounted on a concrete base. It formerly belonged to the Nashwauk, which was wrecked at the mouth of the Onkaparinga in May, 1855.  After 72 years the anchor was em-bedded upright in the sand, but it has been since mounted and will be suitably inscribed in the near future.

How wonderful it would be to once again see the Nashwauk Anchor return to its former glory as a Moana Beach Landmark.

UPDATE:  The Councillors of the City of Onkaparinga met, on 23 Jul 2013, and decided that the “Naswauk Anchor” would be re-located adjacent to the Moana Pioneer Memorial Hall. Exact positioning not yet decided.

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RESOURCES AND FURTHER READING:
To provide feedback on the Anchor’s placement: http://onkaparingacity.com/onka/council/community_engagement/project_status_board/nashwauk_anchor.jsp

Nashwauk Anchor Needs a New Home:
http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/historic-nashwauk-anchor-needs-new-home-in-adelaides-southern-suburbs/story-e6frfkp9-1226624244320

A True History of the Irish in Australia – Not Just Ned
http://www.nma.gov.au/exhibitions/irish_in_australia/home

Major Exhibition of Irish Australia to open in 2010:
http://www.irishecho.com.au/2010/02/17/major-exhibition-on-irish-australia-to-open-in-2011/2000

ABC includes interview with Richard Reed:
http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2011/02/15/3139451.htm

Exhibition opened on St Patricks Day 2011:
http://www.irishscene.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=220:irishaust

The Irish in Australia:
http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/irish-in-australia.htm

Moana Roundhouse:
http://winecoast.heimat.eu/index2/moana_beach/pages/moana_roundhouse.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moana,_South_Australia

Treasures recovered from the Nashwauk: http://maritime.historysa.com.au/collections/shipwreck-collection/moulded-bricks-nashwauk
http://www.oceantreasures.org/blog/do/tag/nashwauk/

Nashwauk Passenger List:
http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/nashwauk1855.shtml

Historic Newspaper articles from TROVE:
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/page/5291051
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/58536914
http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/58533948

SAMemory – Shipwrecks:
http://www.samemory.sa.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=715

Moana Lifesaving Club History:
http://www.moanaslsc.com.au/history.html

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

TROVE TUESDAY… of Washing Days & Suffragettes

Back in TimeAlways fascinated by the daily life of my Ancestors  I’ve found Australia’s free digitised newspapers, on Trove, as a perfect way to satisfy my curiosity and have decided it will be fun  to share these discoveries with readers by participating in Amy Houston’s, theme of Trove Tuesday

The plan is to select items at random from a range of South Australian newspapers, from 100 years ago, and have a look at what my Ancestors may have been reading.  It will be interesting to see what turns up.

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The Advertiser - Banner

Washing Day a Pleasure

Washing Day a Pleasure
12 Mar 1913. pg 3.  The Advertiser: Adelaide, South Australia.

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The Border Watch - Banner

Those Suffragettes

Those Suffragettes
12 Mar 1913. pg 3. Border Watch: Mount Gambier, South Australia.

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 map-south-australia

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Thankyou to Crissouli of “That Moment in Time” for the opening image.

TROVE

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

The Year that was… International Women’s Year, Australia, 1975.

Wedding Day 22 Dec 1941. (c) C.Crout-Habel

Wedding Day 22 Dec 1941. (c) C.Crout-Habel

“Well Kathleen, you choose which one of them will go through High School. Of course Catherine doesn’t count  because she’ll just get married, have children and leave.”

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This makes my dad sound like a heartless beast but he was simply reflecting the social beliefs and expectations in our part of the world, Port Adelaide, South Australia, at the time – the mid 1950’s.

Women's Year. 1975. equal pay. opportunitiesFortunately my precious mum had ideas of her own. From her earliest years and right throught to her dying day mum loved books, whom she considered to be her “best friends“. She valued education, delighted in learning and always regretted that, despite gaining the QC (Qualifying Certificate) which was necessary if one were to attend Secondary School, the family situation required that she leave school and begin paid employment at about 12-13 years of age. So when dad presented mum with that choice she rebelled, challenged the social mores of the time and started working outside the home to ensure that all of her 4 children, and especially her only daughter, were provided with the education she yearned for but was denied.

Women's Year. 1975Trying to explain what it was like growing up through the 1950’s and 60’s, and coming into maturity as the second wave of the so called “Women’s Liberation Movement” gained momentum is very challenging. It was far easier to do a “wrap up” of the origins of International Women’s Day because that is “one step removed” and requires no emotional investment.

Personal experience, filled with all the highs and lows, the excitement, the hope and the opening of opportunities… combined with the personal conflict, disappointments, mis-understandings and outright nastiness which certainly was “another kettle of fish” but it’s a story that must be told to help the present, and future generations, begin to understand the ex-periences, and decisions, of their Ancestors which helped shape the world they now occupy and indeed helped shape them. I’m referring here, of course, to my children and grandchildren.

Women's Year. 1975. owning my bodyIt was a time of protest when more and more women began to challenge the status quo. It was a time of marches, protest, and demands for equal pay, equality in employment and education, free 24-hour child care, the right for women to control their own bodies, safe contraception, abortion on demand, and an end to both violence against women and discrimination against lesbians.

In Australia  thousands of women formed women’s groups and organisations and, through direct actions such as marches and demonstrations, women vocally demanded change to economic, political and social discrimination. Women’s liberation influenced women’s fashion, with women favouring the ‘natural look’, long hair and comfortable free-flowing clothes, including bell-bottom jeans.

In order to focus attention on women’s rights, the United Nations declared 1975 to be International Women’s Year and 1976-1985 to be the UN Decade for Women. On International Women’s Day (8 March) 1974, the Australian Government announced its own program to mark IWY.

Women's Year. 1975. reclaim the nightThe Whitlam Labor government, which had demonstrated its commitment to women with the appointment of Elizabeth Reid as the special adviser to the Prime Minister on women’s issues, allocated $2 million for 1974–75 and a further $1.3 million in the 1975–76 budget for International Women’s Year activities. A National Advisory Committee was Womens Year. WELestablished in September 1974 with Reid as convener. Its role was to publicise and coordinate the government’s IWY program, and to allocate funding to individuals and groups for projects that supported the three objectives: to change attitudes, reduce discrimination and encourage women’s creativity. The National Advisory Committee was supported by the IWY secretariat which was located within the Department of the Special Minister of State.

International Women’s Year also marked the debut of ABC Radio 2’s Coming Out Show dealing with women’s affairs. The weekly program covered issues of importance in the struggle for gender equality. Behind the scenes, the show was a training space for women in broadcasting, a place for skilling up and enabling women to take over the airwaves – or at least to claim some of the airtime.

To hear the Audio of the inaugural  ABC  “Coming Out Show” please click HERE

Women's Year. 1975. shelters.refuges

For this inaugural edition broadcast on 8 March 1975, reporters took to the streets to record some of the excitement of the International Women’s Day demonstrations. Comments from those interviewed in Sydney range from the chauvinistic to the evangelical, including a precious cameo from the late Bessie Guthrie who founded the first refuge for women and children in Australia.

Bessie Guthrie's house     - 97 Derwent St, Glebe, NSW. Australia

Bessie Guthrie’s house – 97 Derwent St, Glebe, NSW. Australia

Collectively the women driving these initiatives were known as the Australian Women’s Broadcasting Cooperative. The Coming Out Show ran for 23 years and changed forever the way ABC Radio sounded and the issues it canvassed.

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Protest March in Melbourne - International Women's Year, 1975

Protest March in Melbourne – International Women’s Year, 1975

As I said, it’s very difficult to explain to the younger generation(s) just how very different life, opportunities and expectations were for women “back when I was a girl“.

This video explains it far better than I ever could. Please click HERE  to view. 

The Women’s Movement, those heady days of the 1975 International Year of Women, combined with the many reforms of the Whitlam Labor Government, after a lifetime of a Conservative policies, all combined to provide opportunities I’d never dreamed possible.  Of course I paid the price with spiteful behaviour, attempts to undermine my confidence, my marriage and more examples of negativity than I even care to think about, but who cares??? … I certainly came out the winner which is reflected in the achievements of my 3 beautiful children.

Mum always said that it’s a parent’s responsibility to give their children a “leg up” that rickety ladder of life. She did that… I did that… and my children are now doing that with their own “chickadees”.  Life is good.

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RESOURCES & FURTHER READING:
http://australianpolitics.com/2001/03/19/womens-electoral-lobby.html
http://www.whitlam.org/gough_whitlam/history_and_legacy
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/fact-sheets/fs237.aspx
http://www.myplace.edu.au/TLF_resources/R2736/description.html
http://www.abc.net.au/archives/80days/stories/2012/01/19/3415303.htm
http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/un/international-womens-day
http://youtu.be/b0TgGb8f-SE
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Anne_Reid
http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/guthrie-bessie-jean-thompson-10382
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/hindsight/creating-a-space-the-life-of-bessie-guthrie/3218016
http://www.glebewalks.com.au/Politicians-Publicans-Sinners-14.html

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

International Women’s Day… what’s it all about?

international.womens.day.logo.2After many decades of  celebrating International Women’s Day, and fully understanding its purpose and ethos, I decided it well past time to actually look closely at its origins.

International Women’s Day (IWD), held on March 8th across the world, is a global day celebrating the economic, political and social achievements of women in the past, present and future. It is an occasion for looking back on past struggles and accomplishments, and more importantly, for looking ahead to the untapped potential and opportunities that await future generations of women.

Although much progress has been made to protect and promote women’s rights, in recent times, nowhere in the world can women claim to have all the same rights and opportunities as men. According to the United Nations (UN) the majority of the world’s 1.3 billion absolute poor are women and, on average, women receive between 30 and 40 percent less pay than men earn for the same work. Women also continue to be victims of violence, with rape and domestic violence listed as significant causes of disability and death among women worldwide.

Women's Day, Clara_Zetkin_Denkmal_Dresden

In 1910, Clara Zetkin, the leader of the Women’s Office for the Social Democratic Party in Germany tabled the idea of an International Women’s Day at the second International Conference of Working Women in Copenhagen. The proposal received unanimous assent from over one hundred women representing seventeen countries. Meetings and protests were held across Europe with the largest street demonstration attracting 30,000 women. The day sparked great public debate, and advocates drew attention to the absolute necessity of extending the right to vote to women to make parliament more democratic.

Women's votes

The very first International Women’s day was held the following year on March 19th. The March 19 date was chosen because it commemorated the day that the Prussian king promised to introduce votes for women in 1848. The promise gave hope for equality but it was a promise that he failed to keep. The inaugural event, which included rallies and organized meetings, was a big success in countries such as Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland. In 1913, IWD was transferred to March 8th and has been held on this day ever since.

womens_history

The UN drew global attention to women’s concerns in 1975 by calling for an International Women’s Year and  held its first official celebrations in Mexico City. Two years later, in December 1977, the General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming a United Nations Day for Women’s Rights and International Peace inviting Member States to proclaim a United Nations Day for Women’s Rights and International Peace – International Women’s Day – to be observed on any day of the year in accordance with their historical and national traditions.

UNWOMEN.lofo

Since then, the United Nations Organisation has observed March 8th as International Women’s Day The UN considers the purpose of this day is to recognise the fact that securing peace and social progress, and the full enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms, require the active participation, equality and development of women and to acknowledge the contribution of women in achieving these goals.

women_india

Since those early years, International Women’s Day has assumed a new global dimension for women in developed and developing countries alike. The growing international women’s movement, which has been strengthened by four global United Nation’s women’s conferences, has helped make the commemoration a rallying point to build support for women’s rights and participation in the political and economic arenas. Increasingly, International Women’s Day is a time to reflect on progress made, to call for change and to celebrate acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in the history of their countries and communities.

Indira Ghandi.

For the women of the world, the symbolism of International Women’s Day has a wider meaning. It is an occasion to review how far women have come in their struggle for equality, peace and development. It is also an opportunity to unite, network and mobilise for meaningful change.

women.worldwide

For newspaper articles which discuss the continuing challenges facing women, in 2013, please click on the following links:
http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/international-womens-day-has-yet-to-achieve-its-purpose-20130305-2fiv3.html

http://www.thecourier.com.au/story/1349889/international-womens-day-is-to-recognise-plight-says-ballarat-scientist/?cs=12

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jill-van-den-brule/this-international-womens_3_b_2828951.html

http://www.humanrights.gov.au/about/media/news/2013/20_13.html

http://www.smh.com.au/comment/this-womens-day-remember-fallen-in-domestic-wars-20130307-2fo1v.html

RESOURCES & FURTHER INFORMATION:
http://www.isis.aust.com/iwd/stevens/origins.htm
http://www.isis.aust.com/iwd/stevens/firstiwd.htm
http://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/un/international-womens-day

Since 1999 International Men’s Year is celebrated on 19 November each year.

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

International Women’s Day: The Gender Agenda

A SILVER VOICE FROM IRELAND

centredinternationalwomensday“The Gender Agenda: Gaining Momentum” is the theme for International Women’s Day on Friday next 8, March.

The story of how this annual celebration came about is  so worth repeating as it is in itself a triumph  of ‘ The Gender Agenda’ and an inspiration to all of us girls who want to celebrate the road  travelled in our name, or raise awareness of  paths that still need to be trod on behalf of our sisters across the world.

From my blog of March 2011, to mark the centenary of this international event:

The first International Women’s Day was celebrated in March 1911. It had its origins in America a few years earlier where women had come together to protest against poor working conditions, resulting in a National Women’s Day being declared by the Socialist Party of America. Subsequently at an International Conference for Working Women in Copenhagen, attended by delegates from 17 countries…

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THOUGHTFUL THURSDAY: … of missing kings and an escaped slave.

THINKING - elfThinking… navel gazing… reflecting… call it what you will, I love it!

From the time I was “knee high to a grasshopper” I have always wondered WHY? … asked endless questions and no doubt driven those around me nearly crazy, which is probably why I’d sometimes got infuriating answers like:

* It’s  a wig- wam for a goose’s bridle.
* That’s for me to know and for you wonder about.
* Just because…

As this blog is my legacy to my descendants, I’ve decided to start up “Thoughtful Thursday” posts to share some of the thoughts which have engaged me.  Maybe other readers will enjoy them too and maybe had similar thoughts?

ManyThanks to Cindy Freed, of “Genealogy Circle” for this idea.  Just click HERE to enjoy Cindy’s Thursday thoughts…

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The BBC News, Leicester grabbed my attention with the Newsbreak:

A skeleton found beneath a Leicester car park has been confirmed as that of English King Richard III.

King Richard III

King Richard III

LINK: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-21063882

Then the battle over his burial place began:
Dan Cruikshank, a BBC television presenter, is one vocal commentator who is pushing for the King to be re-buried in Westminster Abbey, rather than Leicester Cathedral, and delighted me with these words:

“My feeling is that a royal funeral at Westminster Abbey would be splendid. To lose a king is pretty damn careless but when you find him not to give him a proper ceremony and burial would seem deeply remiss.”

Westminster Abbey, England

Westminster Abbey, England

LINK: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2013/02/07/Royal-funeral-at-last-for-Richard-III/UPI-82831360217820/

Then the question: Is Richard 111’s son buried in Kent?

St Mary's Church Eastwell, Kent, England

St Mary’s Church Eastwell, Kent, England

LINK: http://www.itv.com/news/meridian/update/2013-02-08/is-king-richard-iiis-son-buried-in-kent/

Followed by: Where are all our missing Kings?

Experts believe they’ve found the final resting place of King Alfred the Great – born in Oxfordshire, who died almost 600 years earlier than Richard the third – in 899 AD.

King Alfred the Great

King Alfred the Great

LINK: http://www.itv.com/news/meridian/update/2013-02-08/where-are-all-our-missing-kings/

The Guardian then reports: Mystery of Henri IV’s missing head divides France.

Book claiming mummified skull found in the attic of a retired tax collector is that of ‘good king’ Henri IV provokes fierce debate.

Is this the mummified head of King Henri IV?

Is this the mummified head of King Henri IV?

LINK: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/16/mystery-of-kings-head-divides-france

After being fixated on the “missing Kings” of England and France I was then drawn to the fascinating matter of:

The revolutionary friendship of an escaped slave and Irish Lord in 18th century Dublin.

Tony Small escaped slavery and  taken to Ireland

Tony Small escaped slavery and taken to Ireland

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/The-revolutionary-friendship-of-an-escaped-slave-and-Irish-Lord-in-18th-century-Dublin-191196741.html

I wonder what it is that will be grabbing my attention over the coming week and what it is that fascinates you?…

Asking questions

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel