Finding Family… dad’s 1st cousin 2x removed

Is there a more satisfying feeling when you’ve gone that extra mile, checked that extra record, about to “throw in the towel” and then SUCCESS???…¬† I’m smiling ūüėĬ†¬†

My dad’s “Crout family”, from Hampshire, England, are a complicated bunch but so so interesting. ¬†After much hunting and searching I reckon I’ve finally located all of my Great Great Grandfather’s 10¬†siblings. Takes a heck of a lot of time to do even a¬†quick search of each of them, especially if they too have large families… and some of them sure¬†do… puff puff puff.

Well, I’ve been slowly¬†working through Great Great Grandad’s siblings and finally got to¬†one of his 5¬†younger sisters, Frances Sophia Crout.¬† Her second son, fathered 15 children!!!.¬† By the time I worked through all that lot, their marriages and their children, Frances Sophia’s next child was a bit of a relief, in some ways, as no documentary evidence jumped out at me. With a sigh of relief I was about to¬†put Henry Frederick to one side with the thought that maybe he’d died young and I just hadn’t found the evidence yet. Something stopped me and how happy I am that¬†it did for, to my delight and surprise, another fascinatingly interesting part of my family “came to light”.

BDM¬†indexes, census reports, passenger lists etc. show that¬†my 1st cousin 3x removed, Henry Frederick Johnston…¬†the fourth of my 2nd Great Grand Aunt’s children married Mary. They had 2 sons and then in 1902 Henry “scarpered across the pond” to Canada¬†without his wife and children just like my own Grandfather did 10 years later. However, much to my surprise, instead of¬†this Henry setting up with a new wife and family… his wife Mary and sons; Keith Stewart and Jack Murray joined him 10 years later.

Like my Grandfather, Henry (Harry) Eden Crout, young Jack also¬†joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force and fought in France¬†throughout World War¬†1, although in different regiments.¬†I wonder if they knew each other? My Grandfather migrated to Montreal, Quebec… whilst Jack, his brother and parents moved to¬†Winipeg, Manitoba.

More work to be done yet, of course ūüôā … but what an amazing journey it’s been with these Crout’s, of mine. Despite the family stories, I’ve found¬†not a drop of Scottish blood in any of them. At least my Grandmother Marie Ogilvie’s dad, James,¬†was Scottish. You can read about that here¬†and a little about her Grandfather who was born, and died, in Elgin Scotland here.

However, I now know where my fascination with sailing ships comes from and that certainly is not just from my Grandpa, Frederick Alexander Allan.  

“Aye, aye, matie!!!” … ūüėÄ

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright ¬© 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†

Cc – is for Cousin Lizzie

FAMILY HISTORY THROUGH THE ALPHABET CHALLENGE

Cc was always going to be about cousins. I have a rather interesting bunch. Some I never knew existed, like the “Crout half-cousins” in Canada and the “Crout full-cousins” in¬†the¬†United States. Then there are the “Ogilvie cousins” I’m now in contact with via the internet; one still living in the “old country”, Leeds, England and his Uncle who migrated down here¬†to the “antipodes” in the 1960’s.¬†The seafaring “Hampshire Crout cousins” make an interesting read with a couple of “kissing cousins” thrown into the mix and there are the¬†“Murray cousins”, here in South Australia, with whom I’ve just re-connected after near on 60 years.

However, it’s “Cousin Lizzie” who has “taken the yellow jersey” and for three reasons:

     *  The Last Will & Testament of my Susan features her prominently
¬†¬†¬†¬† *¬† She’s been on my mind since writing about Baby Crout last week
¬†¬†¬†¬† *¬† It’s become apparent that many¬†relatives are not clear about where “Cousin Lizzie” fits into the family, nor what it is that¬†made her “different/ special”

~~~~~~~~~

Cousin Lizzie is the Grand-daughter of Susan Kelleher and an integral part of my Family History.

On 13 May 1855 Susan, aged 18, arrived in South Australia from County Clare, Ireland, aboard the ill-fated “Nashwauk”. She and her sister, Bridget, took up service in the Mid-North of the state – the Clare Valley – and on 13 Jan 1856 Susan married Edward Nicholls.¬† They had three daughters;

Catherine Ann Nicholls – abt 1856
Mary Ann Nicholls Р29 Oct 1858 
Margaret Nicholls – 5 Aug 1860

Sadly Edward died of pneumonia, just 4 years after marrying, and is buried at his workplace, Bungaree Station, Clare, South Australia.

Bungaree Homestead – 1863

Four years after the death of Edward, Susan married Timothy Rowen at St Michaels Church, Clare, South Australia. They had 4 daughters and 1 son;

Bridget Rowen – 22 Dec 1864
Eliza Jane Rowen – 1 May 1867
Andrew Rowen – 19 Feb 1870
Susan Rowen – 23 Jul 1872
Mary Ellen Rowen – 6 Oct 1874

I’m related through Susan and Timothy’s second daughter, Eliza Jane Rowen, who is my Great Grandmother.¬†Cousin Lizzie is from Susan’s first marriage to Edward Nicholls. Her mother is their youngest child, Margaret.

Only two of Susan’s three daughters, from her first marriage, survived childhood.¬† Their second daughter, Mary Ann died of “Heart Disease” on 12 Sep 1874, aged 15, just one month before her mother gave birth to the youngest child, Mary Ellen. Their eldest daughter, Catherine Ann, married William Walsh. They had 5 children, 4 survived childhood and went on to create a long line of Walsh/Nicholls descendants.

By all accounts Cousin Lizzie’s mother, Margaret Nicholls,¬†had a sad and traumatic life. On 9 Mar 1875 , at the age of 15,¬†Margaret was¬†the plaintiff in a Court Case against her step-father Timothy Rowen.¬†My Grandmother, Eliza Jane Rowen, was just 8 years old and a witness. The “Northern Argus, March 23, 1875” reports,

“Timothy Rewin (sic), who was indicted of an offence against the person at Armagh, on February 7, pleaded not guilty, and as the evidence of the prosecutrix did not agree with the medical testimony, the jury were directed to acquit the prisoner which was accordingly done.”

 The court document reads,

“Plea Not Guilty – Verdict by direction of His Hon. the Chief Justice, Not Guilty”.

It seems that, after the Court Case, my Grandfather became estranged from the family. Their home at Armagh (outside of Clare) was sold and Susan moved, with her children, to Laura where they remained until 1887 when she moved to Broken Hill, New South Wales taking the youngest children with her. Over the years, many of the older children also settled in Broken Hill.

Shortly after Susan and the children moved to Laura her daughter, Margaret, married Scottish Immigrant, John William Tait, at St Johns Catholic Church, Laura, South Australia. Margaret and John had 5 children,

Catherine Jane Tait – 25 Jul 1880
Elizabeth Ann (Cousin Lizzie) Tait – 10 Jul 1882
John Edward Tait – 29 Aug 1884
Agnes Melinda Tait – 12 Oct 1886
Margaret Ellen Tait – 19 May 1889

Only Cousin Lizzie and her sisters, Catherine Jane and Margaret Ellen, survived childhood. John died at the age of 18 months and Agnes when she was 6.

Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia

As all of their children were born at Laura, it seems that Margaret and John continued to live there until 1889-1892 when they moved to¬†Broken Hill. I believe they moved to “the Silver City”¬†because this is where Agnes Melinda¬†died but this needs to be verified as they¬†may have been visiting¬†her mother/ family at the time.

What happened next in Cousin Lizzie’s life is open to conjecture. She would have been about 7-10 years old when the family re-settled and it seems her life would have been quite¬†difficult for, on¬†17 Mar 1989, my mother wrote,

“… They had a daughter named Elizabeth but who within the family was always called “Cousin Lizzie”. She was rather deaf but understood if you spoke loudly. I rather think she lip-read, she had a speech impediment due to the mid-wife who delivered her deciding to snip under her tongue believing other-wise the baby would be tongue-tied. (this practice I believe was not unusual in those days)”

To read about “ankytoglossia”, the problems it can cause and the ways in which it’s treated, even today, just click here.

Mum talked, and wrote, about how it was said that Cousin Lizzie’s father rejected her because of this impediment. Also that he deserted the family and divorced Cousin Lizzie’s mother who then¬†took her own life. I was told how Susan took custody of her Grand-daughter, caring for, loving her and leaving her well provided for so she would never be “without a roof over her head.”

Aware that there are always “two sides” to any story, I’m always¬†reluctant to pass on negative “family stories”¬† but this one¬†needs to be told, given the contents of Susan Rowen’s “Last Will & Testament” which arrived in my “Dropbox” just¬†last week. Susan did indeed leave all her worldly¬†goods to her Grand-daughter and makes it very clear that she had “issue” with Cousin Lizzie’s father when she writes that the¬†legacy is,

“… for her use and benefit absolutely and I desire that she shall have no dealings whatever with her father or sisters, and if the said Elizabeth Ann Tait cannot make her home with her Aunt Susan I desire that she be placed in a Catholic Home in Adelaide.¬†I want a quiet respectable burial.”

Cousin Lizzie did go on living with Aunt Susan for many years after her Grandmother’s death. They arranged her gravesite memorial and,¬†I have it on good authority, they both continued to tend Susan Kelleher Nicholls Rowen’s¬†grave, in the Broken Hill Cemetery, for many years to come … ¬†along with Aunt Susan’s daughter, Ann.

I have yet to discover when Aunt Susan died and when Cousin Lizzie moved from Broken Hill to the Port Adelaide district, in South Australia. What I do know is that she was a strong minded woman, living on her own means and in her own home at 6 Denman Place, Exeter in April 1934 because this is when my dad and his first wife, Connie, were living with her. My understanding is that she continued to lived contentedly and independently, with family nearby, until her death at the age of 60 on 15 May 1943 in South Australia.

Although Cousin Lizzie faced many challenges, especially as a young child, she certainly was not a “dunce” or a “dummy”, as many seem to think. It appears that her father did indeed have difficulty coming to terms with his second daughter’s “impediments” but her mother’s family gathered her¬†to themselves¬†… loving, caring and supporting her till the end of her days.

Elizabeth Ann Tait’s feelings for her Grandmother are very clear in the Memorium Notices¬†she placed in¬†newspapers, both in Broken Hill and Adelaide,¬†for many years. The notice below is but one example.

Barrier Miner- 9 April 1934, page 2

 MEMORIAM

ROWEN – In loving memory of my
dear grandmother, Susan Rowen, 
who passed away on April 9, 1922, at
Broken Hill.

Always deep down in my heart,
Where love burns bright and true;
There’s a light that will burn forever,
In memory, dear grandmother of you.

Inserted by her loving grand
daughter L.Tait 
~~~~~~~~~ 

FURTHER RESOURCES: http://www.trove.nla.gov.au

Copyright (c) 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Seeking Susan’s family …

Susan Kelleher, my Great Great Grandmother, emigrated on the ill-fated¬†“Nashwauk” in 1855 with her sister Bridget and¬†has always been my inspiration for researching family history (see here). It’s a joy to have managed¬†to piece together her life from the moment¬†the ship was wrecked off the coast of South Australia, until she was buried in the Broken Hill Cemetery, New South Wales, after a¬†long and productive life.¬†

However, I’ve had no luck at all in locating¬†Susan’s birth¬†family in County Clare, Ireland. ¬†A visit to the¬†¬† “Clare Heritage Centre” Corofin, Co Clare, in 1994 resulted in the discovery of a family which may be my Ancestors as they had a daughter, Susan Kelleher born 1835. However there is no record of¬†her having a sister named¬†Bridget, but it¬†was pointed out that¬†this does not necessarily mean this couple didn’t have a daughter¬†of this name because,

“…like most other Parish Registers they are riddled with gaps and omissions in fact there were no baptisms recorded in the Parish of Ennistymon between July 1836 and March 1842 with their being many gaps and omissions in the intervening period. “¬†

This couple, who may be my Great Great Great Grandparents, are Hannah and Patrick Kelleher from the Parish of Ennistymon, County Clare. We know from the Ship’s Passenger List¬†that the¬†name of Susan and Bridget’s father¬†is Patrick but there’s no mention of their mother.

Unfortunately, but not surprisingly, the Immigration Papers for all aboard the “Nashwauk”¬†are ¬†missing from the South Australian State Records.¬†I say it’s not surprising because many of these immigrants complained they had no applied, nor had been approved, to come to South Australia.¬† I’m guessing that some clerk neglected to re-file the papers appropriately.

The Irish “Griffiths Valuation” has been of little help because, although there are a couple of “Patrick Kelleher’s” listed, there is nothing to connect either to my Susan.

Susan was married twice but her mother’s name does not appear on either certificates.¬† Her death certificate has her mother’s name as¬†the same as hers, “Susan”, but we know that these can often be unreliable as those providing the information are not always fully aware of all¬†details. Susan’s Grandson, with¬†whom she was living,¬†was the informant.

The Clare Heritage Centre confirmed that the name “Susan” may be “Susannah” or shortened to “Hannah” but that’s just a “maybe” and not good enough.

Pauline, from “Family history across the seas”,¬†made a great suggestion,¬†that I follow up on¬† Susan’s sister, which is something I’d not thought of.¬† Unfortunately Bridget disappeared from the South Australian records¬†on 13 Jan 1856,¬†after witnessing Susan’s Marriage and there¬†are no “family stories” of her whereabouts. ¬†I suspect she may have travelled on to Sydney, for it’s recorded in the book, “What Really Happened to the Nashwauk?”,¬† that Bridget was one of the immigrants¬†who complained that she had applied to go to Sydney, New South Wales not Adelaide, South Australia.

As the South Australian Genealogy & Heraldry Society¬†has just set up an online Index of BD&M’s I decided to give this a go.¬† All that came up was a marriage for a Bridget Kellery to a Thomas Smith. It was a “longshot” but I did hope that this may be my Bridget with an incorrectly spelt Surname. Finally the Transcript came through and it’s not my Bridget – ¬†Drat!¬†– even if it was there is little information about the Bride.

Well, I have “another iron in the fire” and am waiting… waiting… waiting… for Susan’s Will & Probate Records to arrive.¬† Maybe she mentions her mother’s name in her last “Will & Testament”?¬† One can but¬†hope.

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Sources:¬† Genealogy SA –¬†http://www.genealogysa.org.au
¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†“What Really Happened to the Nashwauk?” ¬©2004.¬†J.Callen. ISBN 0-9595356-2-4. Printed by Butterfly Press, 225 Main Road, Blackwood, South Australia, 5051. Tel: 08 8278 2899

Copyright ¬© 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family¬†

Finding Christiana…

Ahhh… Christiana Ogilvie. We found you!!!
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It’s such a joy to find a missing relative but the feelings that wash over me when finding a little child whose memory has become faded, or maybe even lost, in the mists of time are indescribable… and so it was when John and I found his Aunt, little Christiana.

John is my second cousin and Great Nephew of my Grandmother, Marie (Ogilvie) Crout.¬† Like Marie, he was born in Leeds, England¬†but he¬†migrated here to Australia, with his wife and family, in the mid 1960’s.¬†We have only recently¬†“found” each other through a joint interest in, and love of, Family History and it’s great fun to share our discoveries.¬† In a recent email he mentioned his mum saying that his dad had a sister who died as a child then shared her birth and death registration dates from his archives.

That was it and in no time, at all, we were off and away and soon found the relevant documents to put his Christiana Ogilvie firmly in her place on our shared Family Tree.

My Grandmother, Marie Ogilvie, was born the third of seven chilldren to Emma Chadwick and James Ogilvie in 1880, Leeds, England.¬† She had only two brothers and¬†my cousin John’s Grandfather, also named John, was older than Marie by just three years. ¬†I’m thinking they must have had warm feelings for each other as Marie had the honoured position as a witness at his Wedding when he married Lucy Ann Johnson in All Souls Church, Leeds, in 1897.

Buslingthorpe St Michael, Leeds, England

Later that year Lucy gave birth to their first child, a little girl, whom they named Christiana. The family were living at 4 Wharfdale Grove, Leeds on 27 Apr 1898, and John was working as a Leather Shaver, when Christiana was Baptised in St Michael Church, Buslingthorpe, Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Sadly little Christiana died in her first year of life and just a few months after being baptised. 

East Yorkshire Badge

John and Lucy went on to have another 7 children, four boys and three girls.¬†Their fifth child, Jack, is the father of my 2nd Cousin, John, who is¬†sharing this delightful¬†journey of discovery with me.¬† John and Lucy’s last child, Doris, was just 17 months old when her father enlisted in the “6th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment“, British Army “Short Service” for the duration of¬†WW1.¬†

Sadly John Ogilvie was killed in action in Flanders, France on 13 Mar 1918 and never did return to England and his family.  Lucy was both mother and father to their children continuing to live in the home they had shared at 16 Barkley Avenue, Leeds, until she passed away there on 2 Nov 1961, a much loved and honoured mother, grandmother and great grandmother. 

Christiana was named after her Great Grandmother, Christiana (MacKenzie) Ogilvie who married John Ogilvie in Elgin, Scotland.¬† They had four children; Alexander, James, Margaret (Maggie) and Jean.¬† James took¬†on the trade of “currier”, moved to Leeds, married Emma Chadwick and named their first child, a girl,¬†Christiana after his mother. ¬†¬†Their son, John, did the same.

I agree with Cousin John that the death of his Grandfather’s baby daughter is probably¬†the reason “why the name of his grandmother never occurred again.”

Rest In Peace … little Christiana Ogilvie
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© Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family