Two best friends, ballet and night bells

Last Wednesday I (Kirrily) went to Mum’s (Catherine’s) house to pick up her mail and to go on the search for photos.  I have been posting photos of my Mum to an album on Facebook since she died on Sunday the 6th of July as a dedication.

Included in the mail was a letter addressed to the family of Catherine Crout-Habel.

It was from Margaret Jordan – Mum’s very best childhood friend.  They went to ballet together and from the sounds of it were inseparable.  They had lost contact years ago but had met up sometime in the past couple of years.  Mum told me all about it, they had a wow of a day.

There was a card and it was addressed to ‘the family of my friend Cathy” and included a photo.

Here is some of the letter that I read through eyes filled with tears-

“Cathy was 2 years younger than me and we grew up at Alberton/Queenstown just like sisters.  We were always at one another’s places and went to ballet together.  We had so much fun together and Cathy sometimes went with my Mother and I to Mildura for a few days to visit some of my relatives.

When we both learnt piano, we used to run down North Tce in the city, pressing all the night time bells.

I caught up with Cathy a couple of years ago after not speaking for years.  We met at Largs Bay Kiosk and showed one another photos of our families and grandchildren (of which she was extremely proud).  We met at 10am and were still chatting at 5pm.  I had such a great day and it was just so good to see her again after all those years, it was like we had never been apart.

We both had our ears pierced n 1959 at the same time,Cathy’s being done for her birthday that year.  Oh how scared we were, but we had one another, so that was OK.

I have enclosed a photo of the 2 of us aged about 14 or 15.  We always had such fun together.  We could talk to each other about anything!

Cathy was a beautiful person and a true friend.

Catherine Crout-Habel and Margaret Jordan at approx. 14 or 15, circa 1960

Margaret included her address, and I will write back and I will include a memorial card from Mum’s funeral.  I was so pleased that she sent the card and the photo and a few of the memories that came flooding back to her when she read about Mum’s death.

What made this even more special for me was that it reminded me so much of my best childhood friend – Stacey.  We see each other still, almost every week and we often relive many childhood memories.  She is waging her own war on cancer and I am there helping her do it as best I can.  We too can talk to each other about anything, which is especially useful when she is sitting in a chemo chair.  It has always been the same – every time we would see each other it would be just as if we saw each other the previous day, no matter how long it had been.

Childhood friends are the greatest, if you are lucky enough to hang on to them.  They knew you as a child and they know you as an adult and are able to appreciate all that there is about you because they know you so well and have shared history with you.

Do you have a dear childhood friend like Mum did with Margaret and like I do with Stacey?  I’d love to hear.

I hope you enjoyed reading about Mum’s childhood friend as much as I enjoyed sharing it.

Cheers,

Kirrily

ANZAC DAY 2014

My British Grandfather, Henry (Harry) Eden Crout served with the “Canadian Expeditionary Force” in France, for the entirety of World War 1. He led the Regimental Band on the “Somme” and elsewhere in the collecting of bodies, burying the dead and sounding their “final salute”… too sad    😦
Will we ever stop the Warmongers, and their supporters, whom benefit from this carnage?

 

Are your ancestors also German/Prussian immigrants?…

Researching family history fills me with delight and can have many unexpected consequences. Some discoveries, however, are not particularly pleasant. One extremely valuable outcome is to be alerted to health problems which have been passed on through the generations. What a surprise it was to come across info about the “FH Morocco Gene”  and immediately recognising that my husband, and our children and grandchildren, could well be carrying the life threatening “Barossa Heart Gene”.

Barossa. cholesterol-study. prof Ian Hamilton-CraigProfessor Ian Hamilton-Craig, from the Griffith University School of Medicine, has been working with local doctors in the Barossa region of South Australia with the aim of identifying carriers of the familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) gene in a bid to provide them with treatment and reduce their risk of premature heart disease.

He noticed, when working in his cardiology practice in North Adelaide, that many of his patients from the Barossa area who were of German Lutheran background and a significant number from the Silesian area were at risk of early death because of a special gene mutation and causes very high cholesterol levels which can lead to death by heart attack at a very young age.

“People with FH, whose cholesterol is untreated, usually show very early coronary heart disease and can even die prematurely,” Professor Hamilton-Craig says. “FH is one of the most common metabolic diseases of genetic origin. We think it may be even more common than type 1 diabetes and it’s all due to a single gene mutation affecting cholesterol. We would like to hear from anyone in Australia who thinks he or she may be descended from these early Lutheran settlers, and who may have a high cholesterol or family history of premature coronary heart disease’, he said. It can exist in thin people who have a good, low fat diet.

Prof Hamilton-Craig stresses there is no need for people to be unduly concerned.

“Those who think they could carry the gene can have a cholesterol test with their local family doctor, which may be followed up with a DNA test, and if this is shown to be FH, suitable medication can be prescribed’, he said. “It is very important to test close family members as well, so that treatment can begin as early in life as possible.”

It happens that both of my children’s paternal great grandparents, Maria Mathilde Grosser and Emil Wilhelm Habel, are of Silesian descent.

Habel, Grosser marriage pic

Karl Albert Hermann Grosser, and his wife Anna Rosina Wogisch Grosser, were bfhs. grosser plaqueamongst the second wave of Lutheran immigrants to South Australia who were fleeing religious persecution. Accompanied by Pastor Fritschke. They travelled aboard the “Skyjold” arriving in Port Adelaide on 27 Oct 1842 with their six children. Their third child, Hermann Eduard Louis Grosser was 10 years old when arriving in South Australia and is the father of Maria Mathilde Grosser.

Interestingly Karl Albert Hermann Grosser, died at the early age of 50 and his son, Hermann Eduard Louis Grosser, my children’s 2x Great Grandfather, died aged 49.  Premature death is one of the “markers” we’re encouraged to look for in our family records.

bfhs. johann caeserOn the Habel side of the equation, Maria Mathilde Grosser married Emil Wilhelm Habel who is also of Silesian descent. My research shows that the Habels were slightly later immigrants. They came as a family group… i.e. mother, father and adult children (some with spouses) aboard the “Johann Caeser” arriving in Port Adelaide, South Australia, along with approximately 268 other German and Prussian migrants, on 1 Jan 1855.

Emil Wilhelm Habel, my children’s Great Grandfather was a first generation South Australian, born in Lyndoch on the 12 Jun 1856. The first child of Johann Friedrich August Habel and Johanne Henriette (Siefert) Habel who arrived on the “Johann Caeser” along with his parents, brothers and their spouses. Johann  and Johanne took up residence in Dutton, South Australia where Johann became highly regarded with his sheep breeding and involvement in civic matters, particularly as Chairman of the Truro District Council… but that’s another story for another day.

So there you have it.  Thanks to my family history research we now know about this “Barossa Heart Gene” and what the next step needs to be. You gotta love the Internet, eh?

Anyone who thinks they might be descended from early German/ Prussian/Silesian Lutherans can visit the website www.barossaheart.com for more information or contact the Barossa Family Heart Study coordinator Sheila Storrs by emailing barossafhs@gmail.com

~~~~~~~~~

Resources and further information:
http://app.griffith.edu.au/news/2013/06/17/the-search-for-the-high-cholesterol-gene/
http://www.lca.org.au/research-study-checks-our-bloodlines.html

~~~~~~~~~
Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Susan, Edward and Bungaree Station…

How lucky can you be, eh?  Is it serendipity or maybe another force at work here? … No worries, all I know is that today it came to me to log onto E-Bay and go on a search in “books, magazines” with a focus on South Australia… then up it popped.

“The Story of Bungaree Station by Rob Linn.

Paperback book published by Bungaree Station 2011, unpaginated with black and white photographs as well as some black and white illustrations, colour photographs and colour illustrations.”

Bungaree Station. book

I simply clicked, clicked and clicked again and this book will soon be winging its way to me…  “quicker than you can say Jack Robinson”.

Why am I so happy?… glad you asked.   😆

My Susan arrived from Ireland, aged 18, and was employed from the Clare Depot by a Mr Bryden at 5/- a week. Eight months later, on 15 Jan 1856,  Susan married Edward Nicholls and they had three daughters; Catherine Ann, Mary Anne and Margaret Nicholls.

Four years later, when Susan and Edward’s youngest babe Margaret was just 10 weeks old, her daddy died of pneumonia, at the age of 26, and was buried at his workplace… Bungaree Station. I’ve had trouble locating records of Edward’s burial place and especially an understanding of his working life. Hopefully this book will take me a step closer with the understanding. The blurb reads:

“Bungaree Station, 140 kilometres north of Adelaide, South Australia, is a unique cultural tourism destination. Within its buildings, site, artefacts, memorabilia and historic documents lies the story of rural Australia over the last 170 years. There are few other centres of Australia’s wool-growing history that have so meticulously retained the historic documentation behind the settlement, management and progress of operations.

Bungaree Homestead 1863

Bungaree Homestead 1863

The story of Bungaree Station is full of fascination. The story began on Christmas Day 1841, when the brothers George, Charles and James Hawker, Sons of an Admiral in the British Navy, came upon and settled at the place that became Bungaree Station. From that point on, the fortunes of the Hawker family mirrored the history of South Australia. The records they kept, in word and picture, reveal the story of pastoral occupation and the European settlement of the land. Bungaree was a rare gem at the height of the pastoral era and it is this fact that makes the buildings and their interpretation so significant for visitors, cultural tourists and the study of Australia’s history.

 Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia

For generations the Hawker family have kept alive the core of Bungaree Station’s heritage. Central to their thoughts was the preservation and use of the buildings that are at the heart of Bungaree Station’s life.”

So, colour me happy and you can be sure that I’ll be sharing any info which may arise as a result of this exciting discovery    😯

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

We didn’t own an Ipad…

memories. commodoreMemories of those years when our home was filled with childhood noises: the laughter, the tears, the loud music, clanging toys, Michael Jackson’s poster, pac man  and everything else came flooding back when I first came across this Video.

Precious memories, special times…

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

TROVE TUESDAY… the gathering of further information

This blog is named after two of my Ancestors whom have featured significantly in my determination/ obsession to “find family”. The first of these is my Irish 2x Great Grandmother, Susan Kelleher, whom I’ve written about often.

My 2X Great Grandmother. Susan Kelleher

My 2X Great Grandmother. Susan Kelleher

After fleeing the horrors of the Irish Potato Famine“, becoming shipwrecked, marrying and widowed young with 3 small children, marrying again…  Susan’s final move, in 1887, was from Laura in the Mid North of South Australia to Broken Hill, in the far north west of New South Wales .  This was at the beginning of the mining boom when silver was discovered in huge quantities, the creation of BHP etc. Many of Susan’s children moved to Broken Hill with her.  My Grandmother, Elizabeth Mary Murray, daughter of Eliza Jane (Rowen) Murray and Peter was born there and survived the horrific living condition which her two younger baby brothers did not.

Recent events have drawn my attention back to Broken Hill and it soon became clear that I needed to go right back to my original sources and carefully look over it all again, using my more recently developed research skills.  One of the best places to check, double-check and to gain further information is in the newspapers of the day – bless you TROVE…    😀

Banner. The Barrier MinerROWEN. Susan. funeral 10Apr1922

So, the Funeral Notice for my Susan, although difficult to read, provides valuable information as to which of her children were still living, at the time of her death, and where. Fortunately, despite the bad copy the names are familiar and so provide endless clues as to possible ways for following up on missing family…

First thing I will be doing is trying to find Susan’s home in Sulphide Street onGoogle Maps and how wonderful it would be if it’s not been re-developed… but no worries. Just being on the street where my Susan lived will be enough for me.

I love modern technology and I especially love TROVE.

TROVE

Many thanks to Amy Houston, of Branches, Leaves & Pollen, for initiating the TROVE TUESDAY Theme. Please click HERE to visit Amy’s Blog and HERE to read the contributions of others.

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout_Habel

SENTIMENTAL SUNDAY: Love ya mum…

Always the loving  Mum and Nana... here with Grand Daughter, Kirrily Ann, on her Special Day.

Always the loving Mum and Nana… here with Grand Daughter, Kirrily Ann, on her Special Day.

On this, the 6th Anniversary of my beautiful mum’s death, I’m remembering how my daughter, and I, sat with her and what a terrible “passing” it was. Also how cruelly she was abandoned for the final 10 years of her life, by some of her family, which almost broke her heart and now reading their platitudinous comments is most distressing.

However, this little gem just floated to me from “cyberspace” and I’m laughing along with my precious mum, whose wicked sense of humour comes shining through…

Love ya mum and thanks for the cheerup
😆

This time last year I made my first “KIVA loan” in Mum’s memory and chose to loan to a young woman in Peru to help pay for her continuing Education, which is what mum would love. You can read about it HERE.

framed.kiva_logo

It’s a delight to know how very little money can make such a huge difference in another person’s life and to see them paying it back month by month simply adds to the pleasure and enables you to re-loan to another deserving person who just needs a bit of a “leg up”.   

Why not give it a try… a $25 loan can do so much. For more info just go to the Genealogists for Families’ Project  and see how very easy it is.

May you forever REST IN PEACE Kathleen Mary (Allan) Crout
31 March 1925 – 6 September 2007

Shamrock 

~~~~~~~~~

GENEALOGY FOR FAMILIES PROJECT
http://genfamilies.blogspot.com.au/p/join_11.html

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

The Port Adelaide “Ships’ Graveyards” and my Grandpa…

Image

My Adelaide Northern District Family History Group posted this announcement of a coming event and I thought… OK I’ll go along and see what it’s all about. No way could I have imagined what a delightful, informative and fulfilling afternoon this would be.

Robyn Ashcroft’s passion for the topic was infectious as she drew us into that wonderful world of many of the ships who have found their final resting place in the “Ships Graveyards”  in Port Adelaide, South Australia.

The old map Robyn put on the screen made my heart beat overtime… There was Port Adelaide exactly the way it was when I was a girl.  I looked at the triangle between the  “Old Port Road” and the “Port Road” where my childhood home was… but is all changed now. The actual Port River, the Canal and the wharves – the area which is now the “Ships’ Graveyard” was largely a revelation because I was raised to be a “good girl” and, of course, “good girls” did not hang around the wharves, the ships and the sailors taking “shore leave.”

Port Adelaide - Ships' Graveyards

Confess that I fell in love with so many of those ships and delighted in the stories, and anecdotes, that Robyn shared. This truly is a “Treasure Trove” and one of which I was largely unaware and suspect is true for many South Australians.

If I were younger, and not so afraid of water, I sure would take up Robyn’s offer to go kayaking with her around the Graveyard as she provided more info about the working lives of  these irreplaceable examples of our maritime history. Some were hard working drudges, some had exotic adventure across the seven seas and some were “pleasure crafts” who plied the gulf taking honeymooners and  families to previously unseen places.

I was absolutely enthralled as Robyn described the working lives of many of the ships my Grandfather, a Port Adelaide Waterside Worker (wharfie), would have worked on.  Maybe one of those ships was the very one he was working to unload when a load “slipped” and he was thrown off the dock and into the water?  The evidence of which he carried from then on with a pronounced limp.

However it was Robyn’s information about the ketches, named the “Mosquito Fleet”, who plied the waters of South Australia skittering in an out, loading wheat etc, and then landing their cargo in places where there were no landing facilities which really provided the closest link with my maternal Grandfather. It seems that these ketches would come inland on a “high tide” and because they were flat bottomed and with a retractable kind of keel they would sit there ready to be unloaded when the tide went out, and when the tide changed they’d be off again, just like a mosquito skittering across the water.

It was at this point that I went all shivery and the memory of mum saying how my Grandpa used to drive the horses, and the dray, across the sands to unload the cargo finally made sense.  For years I’ve wondered what mum was actually talking about and wished I’d asked more questions and then “the penny dropped” thanks to the info from Robyn.

So, thanks again to the Adelaide Northern Districts Family History Group and Robyn Ashcroft for filling in a little more of my family story, as well as the South Australian  Department for Environment and Heritage, Robyn Ashcroft’s former employer.

~~~~~~~~~

RESOURCES and FURTHER INFORMATION:
http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/our-places/Heritage/Visiting_heritage_places/Ships_graveyards

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_River

http://maritime.historysa.com.au/collections/mosquito-fleet-south-australias-ketches

 

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel. 

A Special Birthday Celebration…

Bday2

Here is my first born baby celebrating his 46th Birthday in his own special way… grabbing life with both hands and enjoying every minute of it.

Phew!!! … Happy Birthday, Cullen Andrew XXX

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout- Habel – Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

~~~~~~~~~

TROVE TUESDAY: On the day of my Nana’s birth…

Elizabeth Mary Allan (nee Murray)My Nana, Elizabeth Mary (Murray/ Evans) Allan was born in Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia, on 19 Sep 1892.  Nana was the third child of Eliza Jane Rowen, and Peter Murray, and the first to survive the terrible living conditions in Broken Hill at that time…so, as the 121st Anniversary of her birth is fast approaching I decided to check with TROVE to have a look at the reported events on the actual day she was born.

Through the wonders of TROVE I’d already discovered that there was huge Industrial unrest, and a  miner’s strike, in which my Nana’s Uncle Andrew was involved a month after her birth. You can read about this in my “Scabs and Riots” post by clicking here.

Banners. The Barrier Miner

The Barrier Miner, on the day Nana was born, reported that the Miner’s Strike in Broken Hill was being supported as far away as Sydney with some 10,000 people protesting and demonstrating.

TROVE. The strike. 19Sep1892

Advertisements, on that some day, show how some retailers were supporting the striking workers in helping them feed their families.

Trove. The Strike. Walsh

I have clear indications that “Walsh & Son” are most likely related, via marriage, to one of my Nana’s Aunts but need to research further…

Trove The strike. same page advert

Thankyou TROVE for providing the information to help me re- construct the lives of my Ancestors, confirming some family stories whilst dispelling some of the myths.

TROVE

Many thanks also to Amy Houston, of Branches, Leaves & Pollen, for initiating the TROVE TUESDAY Theme.  Please click HERE to visit Amy’s Blog and HERE to read the contributions of others.

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel