Landing in Canada

I landed in Montreal airport after a very quick flight from Newark Airport in NYC and was struck with French instructions, French speaking people and I was hit with a moment of panic.  I’m here alone, so I have to figure this out on my own.  Where to go and what to do to get through customs, where to get my bags and then how to get to where June is going to pick me up.  How to contact June and even how to order and pay for a coffee.  I settled the panic and took it a step at a time and it worked just fine.

The only hiccup was that June was expecting I would take much longer to get through customs and get my bags (based on previous experience) so she was 15 minutes away when I got to speak to her first.  Great!  I said, time for me to get a coffee.

Off I toddle (thanks Mum) to the coffee shop, as for a flat white and you would think that I asked for an elephant in a cup.  He had no idea what I was saying.  Changing the instruction to a “latte, “o go” seemed to work.    The guy before me get a coffee and it was less than five dollars.  So, I go to the plastic bag filled with the Canadian cash of Mum’s from 1994 and pulled out three $2 notes – $6 will be plenty.  I handed him the $6 and he looked amazed and says “wow”.  “Oh, are they old?” I say?  “Yeah!  Are you sure you don’t want to keep them?”.  Nah, I say, I’ve got more.  I only found out later, that similar to Australia, $2 notes were replaced with coins many, many years ago.  He he he.  No wonder he was shocked.

So, coffee in hand I head out to where I told June I would be, and looked for a black Kia.

Not long and we were off, we stopped in a beautiful front patisserie and June got a coffee and something to eat and eight croissants to take with us.  Not really knowing where I was, or where I was going I happily listened to the family stories June told, I took notes, and we kept driving.

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Seven hours later we were at Roger and Jenn’s house.

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Roger is the grandson of Annie Ruby Crout.  Annie Ruby Crout is my Grandad Harry Scarborough Crout’s sister – same father – Harry Eden Crout and same mother – Marie Ogilvie.

This is Annie Ruby Crout, circa 1962 on a trip to Tijuana

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Back L-R Harry Crout, Alan Barry Crout Front L-R June Leslie Crout, Thelma Patricia Moore, Annie Ruby Crout, Doris Beatrice Longhurst, Bruce Milne

This is Annie Ruby Crout, circa 1980

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L-R Annie Ruby Crout, Thelma Patricia Moore, Doris Beatrice Longhurst

From left – Annie Ruby Crout, Thelma Patricia Moore, Doris Beatrice Longhurst

Roger had no idea my grandfather existed until a day or so before and yet, he warmly invited us to come and stay when June contacted him to see if we could meet up.  Because Roger is part of the line of Canadian Crouts that stem from Annie Ruby, he is a full blood relative, and it was very important, if at all possible for me to meet him while I was in Canada.  June knew this and so had worked very hard to get in contact with him to see if there was some way she could arrange it.

I met Roger and his wife Jenn and was handed a glass of wine.  June and I explained where I fitted in, which Roger admitted was still a bit overwhelming.  They were fascinated and so pleased that we had “reached out”.  They both have complicated histories and so didn’t really know their extended families growing up and Jenn said she has enjoyed meeting her cousins as adults more recently.

I heard about Jack, Roger’s father (Grandad’s nephew he never knew he had).  He was a character, by the sounds.  Roger told me how at 14 Jack took him on a road trip, and this is when Roger learnt to drive – across the country!  Roger then lived with Jack.  This is Jack, circa 1978

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Jack when he was older, circa 2002

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We sat by the fireplace, drinking wine and telling family stories and I met Frank, the big sook of a cat.

We enjoyed a wonderful home cooked meal (something I was missing from my three weeks travelling) and more wine and we talked more before heading off to bed.  I was given Roger and Jenn Emily’s room who is an artist

 

The morning was cold – my first sight of snow

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We drank coffee, ate croissants and June shared some stories, documents and photos and Roger shared what he had.

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Original Marriage certificate Henry Edward Crout and Mary Cozens 1846

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Inscription on back by Henry Edward about the birth of his son Henry Eden and the death of his wife

 

L—R Henry Eden Crout (Harry Scarborough’s father) early in his military career when he was about 18 or 19, Harry Eden Crout, Emily Jacobs and Harry (June’s Dad), Harry Eden Crout (far left) as bandmaster in the 60th Battalian of the Canadian Army, 1915

Then Roger took June and I for a tour of their property on the “Polaris” – we rugged up – it was pretty cool and we assured it would be cold on the tour.

What an exciting (and a little hairy at times) way to see the spectacular property of Roger and Jenn’s.  We took photos in front of the fireplace, said our goodbyes and armed with a map, June and I were off to meet Jane – a Cozens cousin.

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The best story I have ever read

I am in the middle of the best story I have ever read.

There is nothing I love more than getting completely engrossed in a story, so that even when I’m not reading it, I am thinking about it and wondering what will happen next.  This doesn’t often happen to me, it has to be the right mix to really pull me in, otherwise I get bored, put the book down and then never finish it.  No chance with this one.

It is a story full of intrigue – mystery, love, family, war, discovery, understanding, reconciliation, honesty, loyalty, respect and loss.

It is the story of two cousins, with the same Grandfather, but different Grandmothers, on opposite sides of the globe, finding one another and then working as a team to piece their shared history together.  A history that is more unbelievable than any fiction they have ever read and is far better, as it is the truth – their truth.

They were both the historians of their families, with a trunk full of photos, certificates and memorabilia to share.  The communication was via email, daily in the beginning, and most days with multiple emails.  Most emails contained multiple attachments and were received by the other always with great appreciation of the time taken to compile and share.  Their shared love of discovering the story spurred each other on to keep scanning and sending anything they could find that was relevant, to help map out the story, as well as bring the people alive.

This story continued over two and a half years as they both became completely obsessed with ensuring that this story was documented accurately and with compassion and understanding.

Then tragically, their story came to an end as one of them died, very suddenly.  That person was my Mum and the other person was June Kendall.  Their story started in June 2011, and with June’s permission I have begun reading the emails between the two of them.  In three days, I have read more than 130 emails and looked at every attachment.  I am so sorry to know that I only have about another 50 or so to go until this part of the story ends.

The wonderful part is that it is all there, documented for me to read and then to go back over, look at what Mum has pieced together and ordered so far, fill in some missing blanks and then share the story, here, on Mum’s blog that she started the year before they first met.

Perhaps that will awaken the passion to finish the discovery that I believe died in June when she lost my Mum.  She said that I would understand how much she missed my Mum when I read their emails, and she was right.  I now know just how important they were to each other, and how tragic it was that they only had the three years together before Mum died and they never got to meet each other, or even hear each other’s voice.

I don’t even need to ask June whether I would have her blessing to write the story here, as I know, from their emails that is what they both wanted – for the story to be told honestly and compassionately and be there for the world, but in particular the descendants to know.

There may just be other descendants, like us, who want to understand how there came to be two families, joined by the same man on two separate continents, who never knew the other branch existed.  There may be even other people completely unrelated that will find the story fascinating.

As well as finishing reading the story in the final 50 emails, I need to work out exactly how I want to go about telling it….  So, if you would like to join me on the journey, watch this space ….

 

Oo is for – Old Scottish Recipes

Here I am, a South Ozzie girl, with the Highlands of Scotland pulsating through my veins. It’s always a delight to learn anything, at all, about my Scottish Ancestors and this “Family History Through the Alphabet” post is focussing on Scottish recipes from the year 1828. I have no idea whether any of my Ancestors actually cooked and/ or ate these foods, but they fascinate me, non-the-less.

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ROOK PIE
Skin the birds; cut out the back bones season them with pepper and salt. Lay a beef-steak in the bottom of the dish, and put a good deal of thickened melted butter over the birds. Cover with a common crust. A quarter of an hour will bake them.

SCOTCH WHITE PUDDING
Mince good beef-suet, but not too finely, and mix it with about a third of its own weight of nicely toasted oatmeal. Season very highly with pepper salt and finely-shred onions. Have the skins thoroughly cleaned, and cut of equal lengths. Fill them with the ingredients, and fasten the ends with a wooden pin or small feather. Boil the puddings for an hour picking them up as they swell in the pot, to let out the air. They will keep for months in bran or oatmeal. When to be used, warm them on the gridiron, and serve very hot.

FIRE PUDDINGS IN SKINS
Mince apples and grate biscuit; take an equal weight to those of minced mutton suet. Sweeten this with sugar and season with cinnamon and grated nutmeg. Moisten the whole with wine, or any well flavoured liquor and fill the skins, but not too full as the bread swells. Boil and serve hot.
Observations – These will keep for a week or ten days, and re-warm. Another kind is made of rice boiled in milk, with suet, currants, sugar and seasonings. The suet in these puddings should not be shred too small, nor left yet in lumps.

CHINA CHILO
Mince a pound and a half of good mutton, and four ounces of mutton suet. Stew this in broth or with butter, and add greenpease, young onions and a little shred of lettuce. Season with salt, cayenhe, and white pepper. Heap rice round a shallow soup-dish, and serve stew in the middle.
Observations. – Veal or fowl may be dressed as above. A little currie-powder may be added to the seasoning.

WINTER HOTCH-POTCH
This dish may be made of either fresh beef, or of a neck or back-ribs of mutton. Cut four pounds of meat into handsome pieces. Boil and skim this well, and add carrots and turnips sliced small leeks and parsley cut down, and some German greens finely shred, and put in only before the soup is completed. Season with pepper and salt. The quantity of vegetables must be suited to the quantity of meat so that the soup may have consistency but not be disagreeably thick. Serve the meat and soup together.

FRUIT PIES, &c
Fruit pies require a light and rich crust. Fruits that have been preserved are generally baked in an open crust, and are ornamented with paste bars, basket-work, stars &c. The fruit must not be put in till the crust is baked, as the oven injures the colour of preserved things. 
Rhubarb Pie. – Peel off the skin from stalks of young rhubarb, and cut them into bits of about an inch and a half. Stew them slowly in sugar and water till soft, mash and make them into a covered pie or an open tart.
Observations. – Fresh good cream is a very great improvement to all fruit pies and tarts. The next best thing is plain custard. In England the cream is often sweetened, thickened with with beat yolks of eggs and poured over the fruit. In Scotland cream for tart is usually served by itself, either plain or whisked.

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RESOURCE:  The cook and housewife manual. SCOTLANDS PRIMARY COOKBOOK. Miscellaneous National Dishes. (1828) by Magaret Dodds. http://www.books.google.com.au

Copyright © 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family.

Mm is for – Mysterious Musicians and Mariners

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge

Dad certainly had one fact about his mysterious father correct – Henry (Harry) Eden Crout was indeed a Musician, a Clarionet player, in the British Army. It seems unlikely, however, that he knew that many of his father’s Ancestors were Seamen, and Mariners of some note, for no doubt he would have regaled us endlessly with delightful tales of amazing adventures on “the High Seas”. I dedicate this Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge” to my dad, Harry Scarborough Crout and his paternal Ancestors, those “Mysterious Musicians and Mariners”.

Dad came to Australia, a sixteen year old lad, as part of the “Dreadnought Scheme”. He came for adventure, and to make his fortune “to take home to mam”, but events overtook him and he remained in Australia. Whilst he talked a lot about his mum, her family and growing up in Shipley, Yorkshire, he had litte information to share about his dad. He seemed reluctant to talk about his father saying he hardly knew him because he was away a lot with the Army. I also remember dad saying that the family’s, of both his mother and father, never “got along”.

My search for this “Mysterious Musician”, my Grandfather, began with a copy of the Marriage Certificate which both confirmed and confused. The best clue was the recording of his profession as “Private 2nd Dragoon Guards”. It didn’t take long to discover that the Regimental Band of the 2nd Dragoon Guards was stationed at Fulford, York, Yorkshire, England in 1899 which is the same year that he met and married my Grandmother, Marie Ogilvie a Yorkshire lass, in York. Henry (Harry) Eden Moody, whose name and his mother’s was changed to Crout on the 1891 Census, was born in Battersea, London, England on 21 March 1880.

How excited I was to see on-line, and to be able to purchase, a photo of the Band, taken that same year, despite knowing that none of the band members are named. However, I do have a description of Henry (Harry) Eden Crout taken from his “Attestation Papers” when he joined the “Canadian Expeditionary Force” on 20 July 1915. I keep trying to pick which of these strapping young blokes is my Grand-father, my “Mysterious Musician” but no luck. Maybe you can help?  He is 19 years old in the photo and described, 15 years later, as:

A Clarionet player, 5ft 7ins tall, dark complexion, brown eyes, black hair, girth when fully extended 36 ins (rate of expansion 2 1/2 inches). Three vaccination scars on left arm and 3 scars on right shoulder. A tattoo of a Heart and Arrow on left forearm and, on right forearm, a Cross and Anchor.”

 

Below is a picture of his son, Harry Scarborough Crout, at about same age.

Harry Scarborough Crout, riding pillion, aged 17 – 1929 (c) C.Crout-Habel

Harry Scarborough Crout aged 29years. (c) C.Crout-Habel

The Mysterious Mariners

Reading that my Grandfather had a Cross and Anchor tattoo, which I later discovered is a “Maritime Cross”, flipped me right back to that Marriage Certificate. Not only does he incorrectly name himself, and his father as Harry Edward Crout when both were Henry Eden Crout but also wrongly claimed his father to be a “Retired Seaman”. What is going on here?… thinks I. Many hours, days, weeks, months and now years of research are finally bringing the answers. He used his Grandfather’s name for himself and his dad, when marrying, and also his Grandfather’s profession. It is his Grandfather who is Henry Edward Crout (1814 – 1875) and he was indeed a Seaman, first going to sea at the age of 16.

The possible reasons my Grandfather gave mis-leading information is another story, for another day. Suffice to say their daughter, my dad’s sister Annie Ruby Crout, was born 22 Dec 1899 and just one month after they married. Soon after, he went off to the Boer War and I understand that the 2nd Dragoon Guards remained in South Africa for a further 8 years, as part of the occupying force. He was simply a Private. As I understand it, the Army would not accept responsibility for re-locating his wife, and child, because the Commanding Officer had not given permission for the marriage.

After answering a lot of questions, rattling round in my head, it was soon time to focus attention on the “Mysterious Mariners” … and what a revelation that’s been. The numbers keep growing almost daily but, to date, I’ve located the following Seamen/ Mariners to be amongst my dad’s Ancestors.

Henry Edward Crout (1814-1875) Seaman, Merchant Navy (Great Grandfather)
John Thomas Crout (1772-1841) Master, Navy (Great Great Grandfather)
John Thomas Crout (1810-1859) Master, Navy (Great Uncle)
Frederick Orlando Crout (1822-1902) Master Mariner (Great Uncle)
Henry Edward Crout (1842-1912) Seaman, Navy (2nd cousin?)
Frederick Orlando Crout (1847-1930) Seaman living/working Wales (2nd cousin?)

So there you have it. A few of the discoveries I’ve made, so far, about my “Mysterious Musicians and Mariners”. When telling my daughter about this aspect of her Ancestry, her comment was “No wonder Grandad was such an Adventurer, mum”. 

If you have any thoughts on which of those likely young lads may be my Grandfather, I’d be delighted to hear them.

Cheers, Catherine

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Copyright © 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. “Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family”

Ee – is for Elgin, Scotland

Family History Through the Alphabet Challenge

As my heart thrilled to the story of the notorious “Wolf of Badenoch” – those “wyld, wykked Heland-men” burning the famed and majestic Elgin Cathedral I had no idea that later research would show the burial site of John Ogilvie, my Great Great Grand-father, to be in this very same Cathedral Churchyard. John Ogilvie is my dad’s Great Grandfather and the Grandfather of my Grandmother Marie. So it is that Elgin represents the letter Ee in my latest “Family History Through the Alphabet” post.

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King David I

Elgin, as the administrative and commercial capital of  Moray,Scotland,has a long and fascinating history. Situated on a low ridge, between the loops of the River Lossie, Elgin was made a Royal Burgh in the 12th Century, by King David I, and in 1107 was chosen as the seat of the Bishop of Moray with its Cathedral located at Spynie, 3kms to the north. The new Elgin Cathedral was not built until 1224 and on area of ground granted by Alexander II close to the River Lossie and outside of the Burgh of Elgin. It was a thriving town with its castle on top of Lady Hill in the west and the great Cathedral in the east. Originally the Cathedral was built as a simple cruciform but, after being damaged by fire in 1270, was expanded with the choir doubled in length, aisles added on each side and an octagonal Chapter House built opening off the north aisle.

Tomb of “Wolf of Badenoch”

This magnificent Elgin Cathedral was sometimes known as The Lantern of the North” but, 120 years after being built, it came under attack and is now a historic ruin. In 1390 Alexander Stewart (Alasdair Mór mac an Rígh), Earl of Buchan and the third surviving son of King Robert II of Scotand, quarrelled seriously with Bishop Alexander Burr, of Moray, who responded by ex-communicating the Earl. An infuriated Stewart, in May 1390 and accompanied by his brigands, descended from his castle in Lochindorb and burned and ransacked the town of Forres. Not satisfied, the following month he burned much of Elgin, incuding two monasteries, St Giles Church, the Hospital of Maison Dieu and the Cathedral, destroying many of its records – legal and monastic. These were irreplaceable and a terrible loss. Terrifying the people of Elgin, and forcing them to flee into the countryside, Alexander Stewart became known “The Wolf of Badenoch” and is forever remembered for his burning of the Royal Burgh of Elgin and the destruction of its Cathedral.

“His nickname ‘the Wolf of Badenoch’ was earned due to his notorious cruelty and rapacity but there is no proof that it was used during his lifetime.”

Destruction of Elgin Cathedral – 1390

Alexander Stewart lived from 1343 to 20 Jun 1405 and held the positions of Lord Badenoch, Earl of Buchanan and later was his brother’s Royal Deputy in Scotland. Under his father’s watchful eye, nobles and many church dignitaries, Alexander Stewart did penance for his wanton destruction, was pardoned and accepted back into the church.

“Unfortunately his repentance was superficial.”

MacDonald – Lord of the Isles

In 1402 the Cathedral precent again suffered an incendiary attack. This time by the followers of the Lord of the Isles and took over 100 years to rebuild. Not completed until 1538 much of the re-construction has since crumbled away, due to the inferior quality of the stone made available to the 15th and 16th century masons, whilst the 13th century construction remains.

Elgin Cathedral continued in use until the reformation of 1560 then, in 1567 , the lead of the Cathedral roof was stripped, by order of the Privy Council and Regent Moray, and the process of decay began. In 1637 the choir roof collapsed, the rood-screen with its painting of the crucifixion was removed and destroyed in 1640 and on Easter Sunday, 1711, the great central tower fell destroying the north transept and the main arcades of the nave. By the end of the eighteenth century the once magnificent Cathedral was being used as a quarry for building stone, however, in 1824 the Exchequer assumed responsibility for the preservation of the structure. John Shanks was appointed keeper and began clearing the accumulated rubbish. It is said that John cleared;

“…3,000 barrowfuls and laying bare the foundations of the pillars of the nave, the elevations of the altar and the stairs at the western gate.” 

Elgin Cathedral

My Great Great Grandfather, John Ogilvie, was born in Elgin approximately 2 years after John Shanks began his work as a keeper for the Cathedral. At this time, the town had a population of less than 4,000 and was still largely confined to three parallel lines of streets running between the Castle and the precincts of the Cathedral. The 1841 Census shows that, 15 years later, John Ogilvie was living with his parents at “Clarks Close” and his father was working as a Carter whilst the restoration continued. Just 6 years later (1847-8) some of the old houses associated with the cathedral, on it’s west side, were demolished and a series of relative minor changes to the boundary completed. Two years later, on 7 Jun 1850, John Ogilvie married Christina McKenzie at the Elgin Parish Church. John and Christina had four children; Alexander, James (my great grandfather & father of my Marie Ogilvie), and Margaret Ann, followed by Jean.

On 10 Jan 1857 when their youngest child was just 3 months old, the family was living at “Mrs Phillip’s Close” and Christina was forced to apply for, and was granted, “Poor Relief”. John, unable to work for some time, had been admitted to Dr Gray’s Hospital and died 16 months later, at the age of 32, leaving Christina to raise their 4 children alone. My Great Grand-father, James Ogilvie, was just 5 years old with 1 older brother and 2 younger sisters.

Dr Gray’s Hospital

John Ogilvie’s Death Certificate shows he died at home, 49 High Street, Elgin on 8 May 1858, his brother James reported the death and a doctor’s certificate was provided. Although no cause of death is given, it’s clearly written that John was buried in the Cathedral Churchyard. On New Years Day 2012 I excitedly emailed the “Moray Burial Ground Research Group” to order photos of John Ogilvie’s gravestone from their on-line Elgin Cathedral Churchyard Index. With the marvels of technology two beautifully clear photos arrived on my computer the very next day. Unfortunately, although the MBGRG Index indicated a very likely match, it is not the gravestone on my John Ogilvie. Their Webmaster, Lindsay, was most hepful and wrote:

“From the death certificate, one can only assume that he was buried there. All the visible stone in that churchyard have been recorded and published and abstracted data is as on-line. This suggests that,

a)  there was no headstone
b)  a stone may have been placed but damaged, removed, lost over the years (this is not uncommon – some sandstone monuments suffer from frost and often delaminate – the inscribed surface just crumbling away
c)  the stone was a flat one, which has become buried over time

Elgin Cathedral is a very important archaelogical/historic site in Elgin, and is managed by Historic Scotland , who to date have not given us permission to investigate the presence of such buried stones. Also, we have cases where buried stones of this type are in fact blank – perhaps the family unable to afford to inscribe the stone.”

MBGRG logo

As John’s widow had sought “Poor Relief” only 16months earlier, it’s doubtful there was money for a gravestone, let alone an inscription. 

It also needs to be considered though that maybe John Ogilvie was not buried in the Cathedral Churchyard, after all, especially as in it’s Dec 2010 Newsletter the “Moray Burial Ground Research Group” reports that as early as March 1848 overcrowding in the Cathedral Churchyard was causing concern. Over the next 10 years the issue was raised several times and eventually, in the early months of 1857, land was purchased to the east of “New Elgin” for the establishment of a new cemetery.  On 28 Oct 1858, five months after John died,  the “Elgin Courant” reported the first internment.  Maybe John Ogilvie was one of the first to be buried in the new cemetery? … This certainly needs to be checked but, in my view, the most likely scenario is that my Great Great Grandfather is indeed buried in the Churchyard of the very Cathedral that those wyld, wykked Heland-men” tried to destroy. I wonder what John would think about having a whole branch of his ancestories, living here in South Australia, who are delighted to know of their familial link with his birthplace and his final resting place… Elgin, Scotland.

The restoration work continues and the conservation of Elgin Cathedral has been of great concern for successive government departments so that today the ruins remain one of the finest examples of medieval architecture in Scotland. Elgin’s population of less that 4,000, when John Ogilvie was a lad, has grown to 20,000 and much has been done, and continues to be done, to invigorate the centre of the town whilst retaining and restoring the old buildings. A relief road has been built to free the High Street of heavy traffic, and through traffic, and has opened up new vistas toward the Cathedral and Lady Hill.

To view magnificent photos of Elgin, as it is today, just click HERE.

If you have 24.55mins to spare, I recommend you settle down and enjoy the following Video of Elgin, it’s historic sites and talented people.

http://youtu.be/qhh6JmCUHA4

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SOURCES:  Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org
                      National Archives of Scotland:  http://en.wikipedia.org 
                      Elgin Scotland Org:  http://elginscotland.org

Copyright © 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family  

Finding Christiana…

Ahhh… Christiana Ogilvie. We found you!!!
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It’s such a joy to find a missing relative but the feelings that wash over me when finding a little child whose memory has become faded, or maybe even lost, in the mists of time are indescribable… and so it was when John and I found his Aunt, little Christiana.

John is my second cousin and Great Nephew of my Grandmother, Marie (Ogilvie) Crout.  Like Marie, he was born in Leeds, England but he migrated here to Australia, with his wife and family, in the mid 1960’s. We have only recently “found” each other through a joint interest in, and love of, Family History and it’s great fun to share our discoveries.  In a recent email he mentioned his mum saying that his dad had a sister who died as a child then shared her birth and death registration dates from his archives.

That was it and in no time, at all, we were off and away and soon found the relevant documents to put his Christiana Ogilvie firmly in her place on our shared Family Tree.

My Grandmother, Marie Ogilvie, was born the third of seven chilldren to Emma Chadwick and James Ogilvie in 1880, Leeds, England.  She had only two brothers and my cousin John’s Grandfather, also named John, was older than Marie by just three years.  I’m thinking they must have had warm feelings for each other as Marie had the honoured position as a witness at his Wedding when he married Lucy Ann Johnson in All Souls Church, Leeds, in 1897.

Buslingthorpe St Michael, Leeds, England

Later that year Lucy gave birth to their first child, a little girl, whom they named Christiana. The family were living at 4 Wharfdale Grove, Leeds on 27 Apr 1898, and John was working as a Leather Shaver, when Christiana was Baptised in St Michael Church, Buslingthorpe, Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Sadly little Christiana died in her first year of life and just a few months after being baptised. 

East Yorkshire Badge

John and Lucy went on to have another 7 children, four boys and three girls. Their fifth child, Jack, is the father of my 2nd Cousin, John, who is sharing this delightful journey of discovery with me.  John and Lucy’s last child, Doris, was just 17 months old when her father enlisted in the “6th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment“, British Army “Short Service” for the duration of WW1. 

Sadly John Ogilvie was killed in action in Flanders, France on 13 Mar 1918 and never did return to England and his family.  Lucy was both mother and father to their children continuing to live in the home they had shared at 16 Barkley Avenue, Leeds, until she passed away there on 2 Nov 1961, a much loved and honoured mother, grandmother and great grandmother. 

Christiana was named after her Great Grandmother, Christiana (MacKenzie) Ogilvie who married John Ogilvie in Elgin, Scotland.  They had four children; Alexander, James, Margaret (Maggie) and Jean.  James took on the trade of “currier”, moved to Leeds, married Emma Chadwick and named their first child, a girl, Christiana after his mother.   Their son, John, did the same.

I agree with Cousin John that the death of his Grandfather’s baby daughter is probably the reason “why the name of his grandmother never occurred again.”

Rest In Peace … little Christiana Ogilvie
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© Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family  

Whatever happened to you Rosa? …

Oh dear, Rosa Patience Crout … where are you??? … what happened to you after marrying my Great Grandfather Henry Eden Crout???  The last record I can find of you is in the 1881 England Census.  Did you die? … Did you divorce? … Did you re-marry? …

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It was 2 Jun 1869 when 20 year old Rosa Patience Crout married Henry Eden Crout in the Camberwell Christ Church, Southwark London.  The London, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921 Record shows Henry to be a Bachelor, Clerk and son of Henry Edward Crout, Master in the Navy.  Rosa is registered as a Spinster and her father, John Thomas Crout, deceased.  There would appear to be some confusion here, or falsehoods told, as a number of other records show Henry Eden Crout’s father to be a Wood, Coal and Timber Merchant and Rosa’s father whilst certainly deceased had, in fact, been a Master in the Navy.

Rosa and Henry’s address is given as 4 Victoria Place, Green Hundred Road, Camberwell and there are no relatives recorded as witnesses.  This is maybe not surprising as both grew up in Portsea, Hampshire. Their families were still living in Hampshire at the time of the marriage which begs the question … why did they marry so far from family and far from home?

It is unknown, at present, if and how Rosa and Henry and related but it seems most likely they are, given the repetition of the same name in both families… particularly Patience which is not only Rosa’s second name but the name of her Grandmother Patience (Thomasen) Crout.  Her cousin, daughter of Uncle Frederick Orlando Crout, is also named Patience and one of Henry’s half sisters is named Ann Patience Crout.  Rosa also had a brother named Hery Edward Crout, the same as her husband’s father, and a sister Eliza with the same name as her husband’s half sister. Furthermore, they all lived close to one another, sometimes in the same street. 

Of course, the replication of names in the two families is no proof that they’re related but is a likely indicator.  Research is continuing.

Rosa Patience Crout was born at Portsea, Hampshire the second daughter, and fourth of seven children to Sarah Elizabeth Ohlfsen and John Thomas Crout.  Henry Eden Crout was the first, and only child, of Mary and Henry Edward Crout and born at Gosport, Hampshire.  Henry’s mother died when he was about 5 years old and his father’s second wife, Jane Ellen Child, then gave birth to two daughters Ann Patience and Eliza Louisa Crout. 

After their marriage, the next documentation we have of Rosa Patience and Henry Eden Crout is 2 years later where the 1871 England Census records them living, as husband and wife, in Speen Hamland, Speen, Berkshire, England.

Ten years later there is a whole different story and we can only guess at what happened to bring about the change.  The 1881 Census shows Henry Eden Crout with the occupation of carpenter, married and living at 102 Palmerstone Road, Wimbledon, Surrey, London. However Henry’s wife, Rosa Patience Crout, is not living with him instead he has a “visitor” named Annie Moody and her 1 year old son, Henry Eden Moody.  Henry Eden Moody’s Birth Certificate shows he was born 21 Mar 1880 at Wandsworth Union Infirmary, Surrey, London to Annie Moody (domestic servant), father un-named.

So, where was Henry’s wife?  He was not recorded as a Widower so it would seem that Rosa Patience had not died.  Further research finally located Rosa Patience Crout in the 1881 Census where she is described as a Widowed Servant working as a cook for Amy S. Law and her three daughters. Mrs Laws is “living on income from land” and Rosa is working and living with Mrs Laws, her daughters and other servants at 36 Outrams Road, Croydon, Surrey, England. Rosa was 32 years old. 

It seems quite clear that Rosa and Henry’s marriage “broke down”, for whatever reason, but what did Rosa do after 1881?  All searches have been fruitless, to date, but I will never give up trying to discover the fate of my Great Grandfather’s wife.  Hopefully Rosa Patience Crout went on to live a long, happy, healthy and prosperous life.

Henry’s life, after the marriage breakup, is well recorded.  He went on to live a stable family life with Annie Moody and her son Henry Eden Moody. No divorce record, nor remarriage documents, have been located but Annie Moody’s and Henry Eden Moody’s surnames had changed to Crout by the time of the next English Census. The family had moved to Hampton Road, Willesden, London, by 1891 where Annie and Henry Crout (sen) continued trading in Coal and possibly other provisions for at least another twenty years and maybe beyond. Their grandaughter, Annie Ruby Crout, lived with them for some time.

Henry Eden Moody/Crout was their only child. He became a Clarinet Player in the 2nd Dragoon Guards, married Marie Ogilvie and they had two children together … Annie Ruby and, eleven years later, my dad Harry Scarborough Crout but that is another story, for another time.  

Whatever happened to you, Rosa Patience Crout? … I hope your life was a happy one.

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SOURCES:  UK Census:1851, 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901, 1911 & 1911 Census Books
                      London,England, Marriages and Banns,1754-1921
                      England & Wales Free BMD Birth Index 1837-1915
                      Birth Certificate for Henry Eden Moody

©  Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family 

 

“Rusty Buckles”

Henry (Harry) Eden Crout, my paternal grandfather, was a clarinet player in the 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen’s Bays), served in the 2nd Boer War and remained posted to South Africa for a total of 7 years, as part of the “occupying army”.

Marie, and their baby daughter Annie Ruby Crout, did not join him and I imagine this is because he most likely did not get his Colonel’s permission to marry.  In such cases the Army refused to accept responsibility for the soldier’s family. It’s a long time for a family to be apart which may explain later events.

For now, let’s listen to “Rusty Buckles”.  Why “Rusty Buckles”? … Well, you might ask 🙂 …

RUSTY BUCKLES

"Bays" Drum Horse - 1904

The regimental quick march of the Queen’s Bays (2nd Dragoon Guards). Published in 1952, it is a quickstep adaptation of the Regimental Slow March.
The regimental nickname-‘Rusty Buckles’- originated in the 18th century when at a parade shortly after the regiment returned to England from Ireland it had steel buckles on its saddlery and harness, whereas all other cavalry regiments had changed to brass. Steel buckles were liable to become rusty in wet or damp weather- hence the nickname. 
 

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(c) Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

Where’s John? …

Tracking down dad’s Ogilvie family has taken me down many highways and byways, wrong paths and dead ends but finally there they were in Elgin, Moray, Scotland. What a delight!

The 1861 Scottish Census showed James, aged 9, living with his widowed mother, Christina, and two younger sisters Maggie and Jean but provided no name for his dad.  Through “Scotland’s People” I managed to access my Great Great Grandparent’s Marriage Certificate and discovered that John Ogilvie, labourer, married Christina MacKenzie at Elgin Parish Church on 7 Jun 1850.  Finally there it was, my Great Great Grandfather’s name –  John Ogilvie! 

 So, what happened to John?  Did he really die young, or… did the Census taker record the info incorrectly, or… was Christina declaring herself a widow only to explain the absence of a husband/father?  

Once again, “Scotland’s People” came up with the answer in the form of John’s Death Certificate. This showed he died at home, 49 High Street, on 8 May 1858 and his brother James reported his death.  Known cause of death is not given, which is rather unusual, but there’s a reference to a Doctor’s Certificate which suggests John may have been ill for some time. Also recorded is John Ogilvie’s burial in Elgin Cathedral Churchyard.

Some time later, after discovering the wonder that is “The Moray Burial Ground Research Group”, I checked their Data Base and found a joint Ogilvie Grave that seemed John’s likely burial site.  Unfortunately the photos & transcript showed that my John Ogilvie is not buried in this grave.

So, where’s John? …

Lindsay, from the MBGRG, was most helpful in providing the following information;

Burial of John Ogilvie at Elgin Cathedral Churchyard.

From the death certificate, one can only assume that he was buried there. All the visible stones in that churchyard have been recorded and published and abstracted data is as on-line. This suggests that a) there was no headstone, b) a stone may have been placed but damaged, removed, lost over the years (this is not uncommon – some sandstone monuments suffer from frost and often delaminate – the inscribed surface just crumbling away c) the stone was a flat one, which has become buried over time and is no longer visible – Elgin Cathedral is a very important archaelogical/historic site in Elgin, and is managed by Historic Scotland, who to date have not give us permission to investigate the presence of such buried stones. Also, we have cases where buried stones of this type are in fact blank – perhaps the family unable to afford a mason to inscribe the stone.

Perusing the MBGRG Newsletter also suggests another possible location for John’s final resting place when they report;

“In 1873 the owners of the cemetery passed a resolution to prohibit the interment of paupers and strayers.” 

Elgin Cathedral Churchyard

In this they’re referring to the New Elgin Cemetery, not the Elgin Cathedral Churchyard, but makes me think that John may be buried in an un-named Pauper’s Grave somewhere. It’s recorded that on 10 Jan 1857, over a year before his death, John Ogilvie had been unable to work for some time, was admitted to Gray’s Hospital, and Christina Ogilvie had applied for “Poor Relief”.

Difficult times, indeed,  for my Great Great Grandparents and even more difficult times ahead for the widowed Christina left with a young family to raise alone.  

Time to turn my attention to 19th Century Pauper Graves in Elgin, Scotland and maybe then we’ll have an answer to the question,

Where’s John? …

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SOURCES:  The Moray Burial Ground Research Group. http://www.mbgrg.org
                      Scotland’s People. http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk
                      Moray Heritage Services, at Elgin. http://libindex.moray.gov.uk/mainmenu.asp

(c) Copyright 2012. Catherine Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family

The House in Leeds

The wails of the newborn babe reverberate through the ward and down the passage of the Leeds Maternity Hospital, Hyde Street, Yorkshire, England as Marie (Ogilvie) Crout gives birth to her first, and only son, Harry Scarborough Crout. 

Over the years I’ve looked at dad’s treasured Birth Certificate and wondered why a child born on 4 March 1912, in Yorkshire, was not delivered at home? C. Lovegrove comments on “Leodis“,

“I believe this maternity hospital took the ladies who
were likely
to have difficult births.”

Maybe this is the explanation.  Further weight is given to this supposition when we learn that Marie temporarily re-located from her home in Shipley for the birth.  There on dad’s Birth Certificate is her address:

“10 Meanwood Street, Leeds” 

 

Curious about this house… dad’s first home, I did a search of the Leodis data base and was delighted to discover three photos taken, from different vantage points, before being demolished to make way for new road works.  Great excitement when the photos arrived.  It’s like touching the past.  My daughter, and I, went over them with a magnifying glass and decided that Marie’s abode at 10 Meanwood Street was on the left, at the rear of the building. 

Always questioning, I wondered why she stayed in this particular house?…  Was it the home of friends, or maybe relatives? The 1901 UK Census showed that eleven years earlier, Marie’s mum, dad and 5 younger siblings  were living at 34 Servia Road, so seemed unlikely to be the family home.  I let the question go and turned my attention to other matters.

A year, or so, later “the house in Leeds” became a matter of interest again. Delighted to be in contact with an Ogilvie 2nd cousin, from Leeds, I mentioned that my dad always said he had cousins in Western Australia but I had no idea who they were or where they were likely to be living. Finding them was especially complicated because it seemed their mum was a sister of Marie Ogilvie.  Was it a sister who emigrated?  If so, who was that sister? Did she marry?  If she married, what was her new name?  When did she come? … All were questions I’d mused over throughout the years, then John passed on one bit of information which changed everything.  He recalled that the relative was female and moved to Western Australia before WW1. Sadly he believed it unlikely she ever knew that her brother John had been killed in the War.

Well, that provided a time frame and certainly focused the attention.  Remembering that the 1911 UK Census had recently been released, I did a search to find out where members of the Ogilvie family were living in 1911, the year before dad’s birth, and there it was at last! … The answer to that ongoing and perplexing question was sitting there, shining like a sparkling jewel, just waiting to be picked up.

When Marie (Ogilvie) Crout gave birth to my dad, at Leeds Maternity Hospital, she was temporarily living with her widowed mum, sisters Maggie Ogilvie and Lucy Bartle, brother-in-law Walter Bartle and 4 year old nephew, Leslie Ogilvie, in the 5 roomed home at 10 Meanwood Street, Leeds.  Whooo Hooo!!!… puzzle solved at long last.

Further research revealed that 8 months later Maggie married John Henry Baxter.  They migrated to Western Australia the following year with John travelling on ahead and Maggie arriving at Fremantle, aboard the SS “Otrantra”, on 14 Oct 1913 but that’s another wonderful story to be told on another day.

Many thanks to my cousin for sharing his precious morsel of info which enabled the sidestepping of that particular “brick wall”.  It never fails to amaze how such seemingly inconsequential “rememberings” can make a huge difference when re-constructing the events of yesteryear.

Thanks also to Leeds City Council and the Leeds Library & Information Service for “Leodis”, its photographic archive of Leeds.  Containing 52,000 new and old images it’s a joyous treasure house to those, especially from across the seas, who are researching Family History.

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SOURCES:  “Leodis” http://www.leodis.net 
                      1901 UK Census
                      1911 UK Census

(c) Copyright. 2012. C.A.Crout-Habel. Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family