About Catherine

I'm a retired schoolteacher and now have time to devote to my passion ... family history research.

TROVE TUESDAY: Jaywalkin’…

Banner. The Barrier Miner

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 – 1954  – Wednesday 13 February 1924, page 3

TROVE. Jay walking.2

TROVE. Jay walking.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/page/3275806

Nothing in the past every truly goes away…

TROVE jay walking-cop-issuing-jay-walk-fines

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/fines-for-jaywalking-double/story-e6frea6u-1226367424693

WHAT IS JAY WALKIN’?… glad you asked    😆

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaywalking

TROVE

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Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Susan, Edward and Bungaree Station…

How lucky can you be, eh?  Is it serendipity or maybe another force at work here? … No worries, all I know is that today it came to me to log onto E-Bay and go on a search in “books, magazines” with a focus on South Australia… then up it popped.

“The Story of Bungaree Station by Rob Linn.

Paperback book published by Bungaree Station 2011, unpaginated with black and white photographs as well as some black and white illustrations, colour photographs and colour illustrations.”

Bungaree Station. book

I simply clicked, clicked and clicked again and this book will soon be winging its way to me…  “quicker than you can say Jack Robinson”.

Why am I so happy?… glad you asked.   😆

My Susan arrived from Ireland, aged 18, and was employed from the Clare Depot by a Mr Bryden at 5/- a week. Eight months later, on 15 Jan 1856,  Susan married Edward Nicholls and they had three daughters; Catherine Ann, Mary Anne and Margaret Nicholls.

Four years later, when Susan and Edward’s youngest babe Margaret was just 10 weeks old, her daddy died of pneumonia, at the age of 26, and was buried at his workplace… Bungaree Station. I’ve had trouble locating records of Edward’s burial place and especially an understanding of his working life. Hopefully this book will take me a step closer with the understanding. The blurb reads:

“Bungaree Station, 140 kilometres north of Adelaide, South Australia, is a unique cultural tourism destination. Within its buildings, site, artefacts, memorabilia and historic documents lies the story of rural Australia over the last 170 years. There are few other centres of Australia’s wool-growing history that have so meticulously retained the historic documentation behind the settlement, management and progress of operations.

Bungaree Homestead 1863

Bungaree Homestead 1863

The story of Bungaree Station is full of fascination. The story began on Christmas Day 1841, when the brothers George, Charles and James Hawker, Sons of an Admiral in the British Navy, came upon and settled at the place that became Bungaree Station. From that point on, the fortunes of the Hawker family mirrored the history of South Australia. The records they kept, in word and picture, reveal the story of pastoral occupation and the European settlement of the land. Bungaree was a rare gem at the height of the pastoral era and it is this fact that makes the buildings and their interpretation so significant for visitors, cultural tourists and the study of Australia’s history.

 Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia

For generations the Hawker family have kept alive the core of Bungaree Station’s heritage. Central to their thoughts was the preservation and use of the buildings that are at the heart of Bungaree Station’s life.”

So, colour me happy and you can be sure that I’ll be sharing any info which may arise as a result of this exciting discovery    😯

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Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

“… and a new one just begun”

In the words of John Lennon…

“Another year over
 And a new one just begun”

New Year 2014

May 2014 bring you, and your loved ones, peace and contentment in abundance…

Detail: Keith P. Phillips, Pyrotechny, 1945, Adelaide, Gift of the Phillips Family to Art Gallery of South Australia 2004.

Detail: Keith P. Phillips, Pyrotechny, 1945, Adelaide, Gift of the Phillips Family to Art Gallery of South Australia 2004.

Never before have I seen the statue of South Australia’s founder, Colonel William Light, so beautifully displayed…  Thanks to the Art Gallery of South Australia.

New Year resolution

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Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

TROVE TUESDAY: The Utopia of the South…

On South Australia‘s “birthday” last year, i.e. Proclamation Day,  I wrote about the origins of European settlement in this particular part of Australia. Not a convict settlement but a planned “Utopia of the South” which you can read HERE.

Another year gone, we’ve just commemorated our 177th Birthday/ Proclamation Day,  so I decided to trawl through TROVE to see how this occasion has been commemorated in days gone by.  I LOVE Trove…    😆

TROVE

In 1873, on the 37th Anniversary of the founding of the colony, the  South Australian Register reported: Banner. The Register

Proclamation Day 1873Proclamation Day 1873. 2

South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 – 1900), Tuesday 30 December 1873, page 5. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39302450

TROVE also delivered up many wonderful photos, from the State Library of South Australia, showing how this day has been celebrated in the past at Glenelg beach (the Bay), where the Proclamation was read when the first “settlers” arrived.

Proclamation Day 1912

Proclomation Day. on Glenelg jetty. 1913

Proclamation Day. refreshment booths near beack. 1921

Searching the 1873 newspapers around the rural area where my Susan settled shortly after arriving from Ireland, just 19 years after the Proclamation was read, there was not a mention of the celebrations which were clearly being enjoyed elsewhere. Seems it was simply “business as usual”.   I wonder why???…

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Copyright © 2013.  Catherine Ann Crout-Habel.

Merry Christmas to all…

A year has passed already and it truly is hard to believe.  I had been blogging for just 11 months when Christmas rocked around in 2012, and here it is again… You can read my many 2012 posts by clicking HERE.

"Mine host" tucking in...

“Mine host” tucking in…

Last Christmas it was my pleasure to host Christmas Dinner which we hold in the early afternoon, everyone contributes and the host adds the extra “bits ‘n bobs“.  One of our traditions is that if anyone has a friend and/or knows someone with nowhere to go for the Christmas “nosh up”, they’re automatically invited to dine with us. Last year my youngest son’s friend David joined us as his family were away on holiday. Here we are having a great time of it. Cool enough to enjoy the outdoors but not so hot we needed to hover inside under the air-con.

Great tucker... I think I am done

Sylvia, Pat & Culllen... happy times

Our Pied Piper... Lisa Lynn

This year it’s expected to reach 34deg in Adelaide, South Oz.  Not too hot…  phewww!!!     😯    but warm enough to enjoy my daughter and son in law’s pool. They are this year’s hosts and the weather will be perfect for it.

The clock has just clicked over… it’s Christmas Day 2013, and whilst cooking I’ve been enjoying some of my favourite Christmas songs so I’ll share a few before toddling off to bed.

This post provides a clue as to why this is a favourite of mine…. plus I also adored John Lennon    😆

Always played on Christmas Day, when the children were young.

Crazy and corny but I love it. Sad to think that in just a few short years the Aussie icon, the Holden, won’t be made here in Elizabeth, South Australia… just down the track from me    😥

For those who are grieving, you may get some comfort from this post on my “sister blog”…

That’s all from me for now… “Merry Christmas to all and to all, a Good night!!!”

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

MUSICAL MONDAY: You’re the Voice…

Colour me naive and call me “Pollyanna” but I still don’t understand why people don’t  stand together to bring about change for the betterment of all.  Way back “before Adam was a boy” John Farnham described my feelings, sentiments and view perfectly with  “The Voice” and I’ll never stop speaking my truth, and describing my views, despite all attempts to silence. Suspect it’s in my DNA – come in Susan   😆

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We have The chance to turn the pages over
We can write what we want to write
We gotta make ends meet, before we get much older

We’re all someone’s daughter
We’re all someone’s son
How long can we look at each other
Down the barrel of a gun?

Chorus:
You’re the voice, try and understand it
Make a noise and make it clear
Oh-o-o-o, whoa-o-o-o!
We’re not gonna sit in silence
We’re not gonna live with fear
Oh-o-o-o, whoa-o-o-o!

This time
We know we all stand together
With the power to be powerful
Believing, we can make it better

Oooooooh,
We’re all someone’s daughter
We’re all someone’s son
How long can we look at each other
Down the barrel of a gun?…

You’re the voice, try and understand it
Make a noise and make it clear
Oh-o-o-o, whoa-o-o-o!
We’re not gonna sit in silence
We’re not gonna live with fear
Oh-o-o-o, whoa-o-o-o!

Ooooooh
We’re all someone’s daughter
We’re all someone’s son
How long can we look at each other
Down the barrel of a gun?…

You’re the voice, try and understand it
Make a noise and make it clear
Oh-o-o-o, whoa-o-o-o!
We’re not gonna sit in silence
We’re not gonna live with fear
Oh-o-o-o, whoa-o-o-o!

Freedom of Speech. Voltaire

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

MUSICAL MONDAY: The Digger’s Song

Ahhh… I’ve been going through quite a lot of emotional turmoil lately and the whole Remembrance Day bizzo, this year, has simply added to it. Music certainly is “balm for my soul” and I just about cracked up when chancing upon “The Digger’s Song” so am sharing in case you also need a spot of stress release…    😆

The notes on “YouTube” report:

“The diggers song also known as “Dinky Di”, this song, one of many to the tune “Villikins and his Dinah,” was probably first sung by Australian soldiers during the first World War, so it is hardly a “modern” song.

Bill Scott wrote the following notes in his compilation, “The Second Penguin Australian Songbook” (Penguin Books Australia, Ringwood, Victoria, 1980): I first heard this song during the Second World War, sung with great feeling by a soldier of the Sixth Division, who sang it as above, except that instead of using the first and second lines of the second verse, he sang:

The Digger then shot him a murderous look. He said, ‘I’m just back from that place called Tobruk.’

The song was not only sung during the first and second World Wars but it was updated to fit the settings of both the Korean and Vietnamese wars.”

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RESOURCE:  YouTube

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Remembrance Day and remembering…

“On the 11th hour, of the 11th day of the 11th month… we will remember them”. 

Right now I’m remembering back when I was shooting down the shop to do some messages and mum reminded me to “keep my wits about me” because it was Remembrance Day and when it turned 11 o’clock I was to STOP what I was doing, bow my head and remember those who gave their all in the War.

Querulous me asked… “but how will I know if it’s 11 o’clock” for I had no watch.  “Just keep your wits about you Catherine”… I did and I knew it was “the time” because everything, and everyone, stopped and the silence was palpable.

Remembrance Day is indeed the time for remembering and finally the War Service of our Indigenous Australian’s has been recognised with the unveiling of our Nation’s first memorial, here in Adelaide, South Australia dedicated to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Servicemen, and Servicewomen  and  and my heart just about bursts with pride and happiness.

I also learn that the Boer War, more than 110 years ago, marked the first time Aboriginal soldiers served on active duty with Australian services and then remember another reason to be proud to be South Australian. It’s that magnificent statue in our C.B.D. at the corner of King William Street and North Terrace honouring the 12,000 Australians who served in the six colony contingents which was the first time Australians had served/ fought overseas but because it was before “Federation” has been largely overlooked. These soldiers were volunteers and mostly mounted units known as MOUNTED RIFLES, BUSHMEN or IMPERIAL BUSHMEN. In honour of the 600 who died the SOUTH AFRICA WAR MEMORIAL was unveiled, here in Adelaide, on 4 June 1904 by Governor Le Hunte.

“Your stature is a statue of action and it betokens the action of Empire when it is called for” 

Then sadness overtakes me as I remember those whose sacrifices certainly are not honoured, not respected and their memorials are moved and/ or destroyed. To read about this please follow this LINK.

RESOURCES:
http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/nations-first-aboriginal-war-memorial-at-torrens-parade-ground-unveiled/story-fni6uo1m-1226756887144?sv=143efa29cdfb8ab475c78f7bae4f9be4#.Un98T9I0ZJA.facebook

http://www.antiquarianprintgallery.com.au/Boer-War-1899.htm

Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

We didn’t own an Ipad…

memories. commodoreMemories of those years when our home was filled with childhood noises: the laughter, the tears, the loud music, clanging toys, Michael Jackson’s poster, pac man  and everything else came flooding back when I first came across this Video.

Precious memories, special times…

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel