Shin of beef stewed

Stews, and especially a good, hearty, nourishing “Beef Stew” is one of my most favourite meals… probably second only to a delish home cooked “lamb roast”, with all the trimmings and comes from my British heritage. What a delight to read this version from way way back and am intending to try out some slight different strategies. If you also enjoy recipes from days gone by this sure is a good read…

The Cookbook of Unknown Ladies

As southern Britain is buffeted by strong, wintry winds, here’s some hearty, comforting fare to warm us up:

Shin of Beef Stewed

Have the bone sawed into three or four pieces. Just cover it with water. When it simmers, skim it clean. Then put in a bundle of sweet herbs, an onion, a head of celery, a dozen berries of allspice, same of black pepper. Stir very gently for about four hours. Boil till tender some carrots, turnips & button onions. About fifteen minutes will do. Carrots twice as long cut in dices. When the beef is ready, thicken a pint & half of the gravy. To do this, mix three tablespoonsful of flour with a teacup full of the broth. Stir it well together. Scum & strain. Put your vegetables in it to warm, season. Make soup of the rest as directed for Bouilli…

It’s a while since we…

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TROVE TUESDAY… the gathering of further information

This blog is named after two of my Ancestors whom have featured significantly in my determination/ obsession to “find family”. The first of these is my Irish 2x Great Grandmother, Susan Kelleher, whom I’ve written about often.

My 2X Great Grandmother. Susan Kelleher

My 2X Great Grandmother. Susan Kelleher

After fleeing the horrors of the Irish Potato Famine“, becoming shipwrecked, marrying and widowed young with 3 small children, marrying again…  Susan’s final move, in 1887, was from Laura in the Mid North of South Australia to Broken Hill, in the far north west of New South Wales .  This was at the beginning of the mining boom when silver was discovered in huge quantities, the creation of BHP etc. Many of Susan’s children moved to Broken Hill with her.  My Grandmother, Elizabeth Mary Murray, daughter of Eliza Jane (Rowen) Murray and Peter was born there and survived the horrific living condition which her two younger baby brothers did not.

Recent events have drawn my attention back to Broken Hill and it soon became clear that I needed to go right back to my original sources and carefully look over it all again, using my more recently developed research skills.  One of the best places to check, double-check and to gain further information is in the newspapers of the day – bless you TROVE…    😀

Banner. The Barrier MinerROWEN. Susan. funeral 10Apr1922

So, the Funeral Notice for my Susan, although difficult to read, provides valuable information as to which of her children were still living, at the time of her death, and where. Fortunately, despite the bad copy the names are familiar and so provide endless clues as to possible ways for following up on missing family…

First thing I will be doing is trying to find Susan’s home in Sulphide Street onGoogle Maps and how wonderful it would be if it’s not been re-developed… but no worries. Just being on the street where my Susan lived will be enough for me.

I love modern technology and I especially love TROVE.

TROVE

Many thanks to Amy Houston, of Branches, Leaves & Pollen, for initiating the TROVE TUESDAY Theme. Please click HERE to visit Amy’s Blog and HERE to read the contributions of others.

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout_Habel

South Australians have “Grave Concerns”

Four Generation: Front: Me and Eliza Jane. BACK:  Mum and Nana, 1950. (c) C.A.Crout-Habel

Four Generation: Front: Me and Eliza Jane. BACK: Mum and Nana, 1950.
(c) C.A.Crout-Habel

Readers who have been following this blog for quite a while may remember the first time I wrote about the re-using/ re-cycling of South Australian Graves.  It came about because finally I had found the Burial Site of my Susan’s daughter, my great grandmother Eliza Jane (Rowen) Murray, at Cheltenham Cemetery and was having trouble locating the descendants of the now deceased lease holder, Great Uncle Andy, to have the lease signed over to me… That was 16 months ago, on 22 Jun 2012, and  that issue has not yet been resolved but I have paid the lease (including back fees) to keep Eliza Jane undisturbed for a few more years although I have no ownership and am unable to erect a decent monument etc, but at least she’s safe.

If you missed that story, you can read about it HERE.

Many many stories later, the topic of the desecration of South Australian Ancestral burial sites was threatening to over whelm this Blog so a month ago I set up a sister site, dedicated to South Australian Graves under threat, which I wrote about HERE.

Advertiser Banner 2013

Some action is finally happening, here in South Australia, and people are beginning to speak out in opposition to this practice of reusing graves.  So, HERE is the link to that story and information as to how to contribute to the discussion, if that’s something you’d like to do.

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

MUSICAL MONDAY: The Fields of Athenry

“The Fields of Athenry” is a folk song about the Great Irish Famine (1845-1849), composed in the 1970s by Inchicore songwriter Pete St. John and first recorded by Irish ballad singer Danny Doyle. It tells the story of the famine through first-person narrative, recounting the tale of a prisoner who has been sentenced to being transported to Botany Bay, Australia, for stealing food to feed his starving family. The claim has been made that the words originate from a broadsheet ballad published in the 1880s by Devlin in Dublin with a different tune; however Pete St. John has stated definitively that he wrote the words as well as the music, so the story of the 1880s broadsheet may be false.

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Copyright © 2013.  Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

A FEW MOMENTS IN TIME…

CrissouliAm pleased to have found a few moments to respond to Crissouli’s request to fill out a questionnaire which I hope will help others, as they continue with their search for Ancestors and the Ancestral Stories. Hopefully some reading this, who are also genealogy/ family history researchers, may find the time to join in. No time limit.

Chris wrote:

WANTED – A FEW MOMENTS OF YOUR TIME…

Working with family historians/genealogists daily, I see the same questions being asked on a regular basis. I often wonder what has led this or that person to researching their ancestry.

No prizes for answering the questions below… but it could be of interest to all of us who help others on a regular basis.

You may answer on your own blog, in the comments section below or on Facebook which will have a link to this blog.

Please let me know if you answer on your own blog, so I can keep a list for others to follow… no time limit…

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QUESTIONNAIRE

1. What is the most important detail you want to find about your ancestors?

Their beliefs, activities and daily life, the times they lived in and especially what it is that they were passionate about.


2. Do you buy certificates?

Sure do… It’s absolutely essential to be clear when documenting the lives of our families and there is also a great deal of additional info on Certificates which can lead to even more discoveries e.g. my paternal grandparent’s marriage certificate had the name of his UK Army Regiment which enabled me to track him down and find a whole heap of additional living relatives in Canada… and what a joy that is.

3. Do you belong to a paid subscription site, if so, which one?

“Ancestry UK” and “Find My Past”

My subscription to Ancestry is via their UK site because it’s half the price for accessing exactly the same information through their Australian site. I find “Ancestry Family Tree Maker”, which synchs with my Ancestry Tree, to be most valuable in creating reports, on selected parts of my large tree, which I then either print out and “snail mail” or email direct to other family and genuine researchers.  My Ancestry Tree is private, which enables me maintain it’s integrity and stop people “swiping” branches off my Tree and incorrectly grafting onto their own. Genuine researchers can always make a personal request and so we share, and share, alike.

“Find My Past” provides access to information not available on Ancestry and also serves as a double checking mechanism which I find invaluable.

4. What has been your ‘best’ find?

Oh… there are just so very many it’s impossible to select a “best“. However some of my research has led to amazing amounts of information which is valuable to many, apart from me. Here are a few examples which I hope will encourage many new researchers in their detective work.

Tracking down my paternal Grandfather, Henry Eden Crout  jnr,  and finding so many living relatives in Canada, connecting with them and forging great friendships is indeed a highlight. That came about through accessing his marriage certificate I found on “free BMD” then purchased, contacting his Army Regiment, accessing his Canadian Attestation papers for WW1 and once I knew where, in Canada, he lived I trawled the Internet and left a message of a Veteran’s Redevelopment Housing Estate Website and some 9 months later I got a reply. I’ve now found more “Canadian Cousins” than “you can shake a stick at” and am far happier than I can say    😥

Finding all the children of my Irish 2x Great Grandmother, Susan Kelleher, was another delight. Initially my problems were because she had been married before wedding my 2x Great Grandfather, Susan first married Edward Nicholls, had 3 children and was widowed when the youngest was just a baby. Much sorting and sifting, trips to Country Family History Centres, communicating with others and online research reaped a rich reward. What a joy to be contacted by a direct relation of Susan’s only son, who lives in Queensland and to be told what pleasure my research had given to her aging Grandfather. There was some sort of mixed up family story that he had been “on the run from the police” but my post “Of Scabs and Riots” showed that they had every reason to be very proud of our Andrew Rowen.

Another highlight, which I must mention, was being contacted by a woman in Queensland who had found my information about hubbie’s Grandmother on Ancestry. She was researching this Hembury family in support of a woman, here in Adelaide, who was writing a book on Nana’s family. They knew nothing about this branch of the family other than that which was published on my Ancestry Tree. Agreeing to see who else I could find was challenge but with a huge payout when so many of Nana’s living relatives joined us for the Hembury Family Reunion and Book Launch  some 12 months later.  What a joy!!!

5. Who is your favourite ancestor and why?

My Susan Kelleher… indeed she is. Well, that is apart from my darling mum, of course.

Susan is my 2x Great Grandmother who at the age of 18 arrived from County Clare, Ireland, on the “bride ship” the Nashwauk which was wrecked off the coast of South Australian, on 13 May 1855, just 40 miles from their destination of Port Adelaide. As a child I thrilled to the stories of the girls being carried ashore on the backs of the sailors and many holidays were spent in the vicinity of the Wreck Site and family photos taken around the “Nashwauk Anchor”. It is Susan who began my love of/ obsession with Family history and saving her daughter’s grave at Cheltenham Cemetery has led me to help others save the graves of their Ancestors as well. I “feel” Susan very close to me all the time and many with even a “touch of the Irish” know what I mean by this.

Next is my Marie…and I must mention her. Marie is my dad’s mother and she is the person who was “the wind beneath my wings” encouraging me to keep on keeping on, one tired step after another to eventually find dad’s childhood home in Windhill, Shipley, Yorkshire, England and bring back the photos which delighted, and comforted, him in his declining years. I have a sense that Marie was pleased and also that she’s satisfied I’ve discovered where her errant husband disappeared to and that the family has finally become whole. Incidentally, when I asked June what  our Grandfather would think of us tracking each other down, she said he would probably say… “Nosey little buggers…”  but we sure are smiling with the happiness of it.

6. What are you looking for on a regular basis?

A number of things. Most important, to me, is finding the links to bring our estranged family back together again, particularly those of us who are still living.  Then finding the family stories, understanding the period in which the Ancestors lived and trying to understand who they were as people, what motivated them and what it is they were passionate about.

From time to time there have been individuals I’m particularly curious about whom seem to have “fallen of the planet“, particularly female ancestors whom we know can be very difficult to track down.  One such person is Rosa Patience Crout who was a first cousin to my Great Grandfather Henry Eden Crout snr. As well as being cousins, Rosa and Henry also married, I lost track of them and finally found Henry with a “visitor” and her child, Henry Eden Moody (whom ultimately became my Grandfather, Henry Eden Crout jnr), on a Census but his wife/ cousin Rosa Patience had disappeared, I could not find her anywhere and did “fret”.  I wrote about the missing Rosa HERE but have not had a chance yet to write the follow-up story i.e. about 2 months ago, along with one of my Canadian cousins, I found Rosa had become Rose Crout and had  “married” another man.  That made me SO happy but then Rosa (now Rose) has disappeared again. My newly discovered Canadian cousin Jane and I think Rosa may be a “serial bride”, for want of a better description, and we chuckle over the thought of it.

7. Do you belong to any genealogy group, or family history society?

For decades now, ever since I started researching my family, I’ve been a member of the “South Australian Genealogy & Heraldry Society Inc” and also their Irish Group. I’d often thought about joining one, or maybe both, of the local Family History Groups nearby but kept thinking there was not much to be gained as none of my Ancestors ever lived here which has been the home of me, hubbie and our children, for the past 40 plus years. Then, thanks to the wonders of the Internet, I discovered that the “Adelaide Northern Districts Family History Group” has not only local family history resources but a wide range of resources, on hand, and also internet access to even more… so I joined “lickety spit” and have discovered a great group of people with the same interests. Why John even taught me how to say “Portsmouth”, where many of my dad’s Ancestors lived for generations, with the correct Hampshire accent. He delights in giving me a little “test” each time we meet up. I found much to be gained, apart from accessing resources, when joining a local Family History/Genealogy Group.

Twenty years ago I joined the South Australian “Irish Australian Association” and spent many happy hours banging on the “Bodhran” and tweeting on the “Tin Whistle” in their Celtic Music Group… not to mention singing songs, rhymes, ditties and having  conversations in “the Irish” in their Irish Language classes and attending a number of  “Language Summer Schools” interstate and making a whole heap of other wonderful friends. So, an obsession with Family History can indeed lead to other friendship groups, is what I’ve found.

8. Do you belong to any Facebook or other social media genealogy groups? Would you join if there was one available?

Oh yes… and maybe too many I’m thinking and may need to begin to “cull”.  As well as membership in many “groups” I’m also an Administrator for two small “dedicated” and “secret” groups which is an effective tool sharing research information with just a few.  I’m also a Joint Administrator for another far more demanding “group“. Thank heavens for having loyal people working with you because this one I’d certainly not be able to manage on my own.

As well as having a Facebook page “South Australia matters”, which is lots of fun, includes genealogy and family history but much more also. In addition,  I’ve “liked” very many Genealogy Facebook pages which was a bit over-whelming initially but once you learn how to “manage” them it’s a breeze and so much valuable information comes to you via these “pages”. 

Facebook is a comfortable place for me, probably because many, many years ago my eldest Grandson who was then 11 years old said, “Mamo, you have to go on Facebook” and there and then he set me up.  Sometimes I think that now he’s older her may regret this action…  So, it’s been my children, and grandchildren, who introduced me to the joy of Facebooking, showed me the pitfalls, advised where I’ve “gone wrong”, and all the rest of it… including ways to maintain security without falling for the endless “scare campaigns” which appear from time to time. My personal page is deliberately small and is where I enjoy to meet with family and close friends and especially delight in seeing photos of the “littlies” as they grow up and get to hear of their achievements which I’d miss out on without the wonder that is Facebook. I do understand, however, that Facebook is not a “comfortable place” for others.

Worth mentioning also is that I use “Twitter” for accessing, and sharing, information on a whole range of topics which are of interest. Some happen to be genealogical / historical, in nature, some are not. Twitter is not a place where I go to socialise.

Finally, another valuable source of online information, which I enjoy, are the Internet Newspapers to which I’ve subscribed.  One example is our Jill Ball’s  ” Australian Genealogist Daily” but I also subscribe to a range of others whose content is not  focussed on geneaology.

9. Have you ever volunteered to transcribe, index etc.? Would you be interested in doing so?

No, although I certainly admire, and appreciate, the work of  people who donate their own valuable time to do this transcribing for others and try always to show my appreciation. I have some information which I’m thinking the Clare Roots Society, or maybe some other similar Group, would appreciate but am not sure how to go about it. Maybe this post will result in contact from someone advising how best I can do this.

10. What is your personal reason for being involved with genealogy/family history?

For me it’s about knowing who you are, where you come from and what the forces are that shaped you. Also it has a lot to do with the fact that, after my Nana died, mum split from her very large family which has left me with a childhood longing to “reconnect” with the lost “rellies”. I was only 6 at the time and have very fond memories but, as an adult, understand exactly why mum made that very difficult decision.

After decades of research, clarifying the truth in the many “family stories” and especially debunking the nonsense with “verifiable” information, I then needed to find a way to pass this information on. I believe that I owe this to my Ancestors.  Many of their other descendants I don’t know and there are others I rarely meet up with nowadays so, once again, it was my children who showed me the way forward… i.e. “blogging”.  It took a while for me to work out the “blogging platform” which best suits me but it was well worth all the time and tryouts.

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Well there you have it and hope it’s helpful to others…  🙂

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

TROVE TUESDAY: 8 Hour Day

We South Australians have just enjoyed a “Long Weekend” to celebrate “Labour Day” and many marched in the streets in remembrance. Mum always determinedly referred to it at “8 hours day” and reminded her children how hard the Unions toiled, with the workers, for better working conditions.

“eight hours of work, eight hours for recreation and eight hours for sleep” 

labour-day 2013. Brisbane

In the early 19th century, most labourers worked 10- or 12-hour days for six days each week. The 1850s brought a strong push for better conditions.  The fight was for an eight-hour day, effectively a 48-hour week to replace the 60-hour week and Australian workers stopped work and marched from the University of Melbourne to Parliament House.

1856 Union Banner.  Source: Wikipedia

1856 Union Banner. Source: Wikipedia

The government finally agreed to an eight-hour day for workers employed on public works, with no loss of pay. This win was a world first but did not end all labour problems. Many working conditions were harsh and demanding, and women were paid a lot less than men. However, the victory for the eight-hour day was a significant breakthrough, by the Unions to improve working conditions in Australia.

As our three day weekend came to a close mum’s words came flooding back so I checked Trove to see what I could find on our National Library of Australia site and to my delight was advised of a photo held here in our State Library of South Australia.

It shows Holden’s float for the 8 Hour Day procession in 1925 with a group of men standing alongside. The lorry was an A.E.C. registration number 24-347 and was new in 1925. This is the year my mum was born and her dad, Frederick Alexander ALLAN, would have been marching in that parade with others in the Waterside Workers Federation.  

Holden's Float in South Australia's 8 hour day Parade - 1925 - Source: SLSA  B56561

Holden’s Float in South Australia’s 8 hour day Parade – 1925 – Source: SLSA B56561

THANKYOU TROVE!!!

TROVE

Many thanks also to Amy Houston, of Branches, Leaves & Pollen, for initiating the TROVE TUESDAY Theme.

Please click HERE  to visit Amy’s Blog and HERE  to read the contributions of others.

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RESOURCES & FURTHER INFORMATION:
http://images.slsa.sa.gov.au/mpcimg/56750/B56561.htm
http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/16418226
http://publicholidays.com.au/labour-day/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_holidays_in_Australia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_labour_movement
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight_hour_day
http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/thousands-turn-out-for-labour-day-march-in-brisbane/story-e6freoof-1226348812538

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

To collar meat

For those who, like me, are fascinated with the daily lives of their female Ancestors this Blog sure is a place to go to. Enjoy!!!

The Cookbook of Unknown Ladies

We last looked at ‘collaring’ when we put together a Regency menu of beef and Yorkshire pudding for St George’s Day. Today’s first two recipes use the same technique of tightly rolling and binding meat, which is then pickled for use at a later date.

Nowadays, brawn (in its culinary sense) is often used to refer to a jellied preparation of pig’s head and tongue. In this Georgian recipe for collared brawn, it refers to the raw head meat. The meat is stripped from the skull before being salted, seasoned and boiled in a vinegar solution. Then, rolled up tightly in cloth, it is steeped in a strong pickle until tender and ready for use:

To Collar Brawn

Take a quarter of brawn, lay it in salt three days. Then take some all spice, cloves & mace & season it. Boyle it in a cloath very soft with some vinegar, salt & water till it be tender. Then rowl it…

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