The passing of an era…

“Ta bron orm” … the sadness is upon me.

The passing of an era happened less than 24 hours ago.

Leslie Eden Crout. (c) June Leslie Crout.

Leslie Eden Crout. (c) June Leslie Crout.

My Uncle Leslie Eden Crout died in Canada, aged 97.  He’s the younger of my dad’s two half brother and I have no idea if Dad ever knew that Leslie existed but I’m sure they’ll be catching up now… along with their dad and all the rest of them…in that world beyond this.  I’m sending them all much love and hope that their “catching up” will be harmonious with all the past hurts and rejection put to one side and that they’ll rejoice in finally finding each other.

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© Copyright 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Quotable Quote: True compassion…

Martin-Luther-King-Jr-9365086-2-402

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:

“True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it is not haphazard and superficial. It comes to see that an edifice that produces beggars needs restructuring.

-Martin Luther King, Jr., civil-rights leader (1929-1968)”

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Sentimental Sunday: Grave concerns continue in Western Australia…

GRAVES at Karrakatta WA. 19May2013.Over a month ago I wrote about the wanton destruction, and desecration of Gravesites in Western Australia.

Sadly,  I’ve received photographs taken today ,19 May 2013, at the Anglican Section ZL of Karrakatta Cemetery showing that this travesty is continuing.

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Desecration at Karrakatta Cemetery - 19 May 2013

Desecration at Karrakatta Cemetery – 19 May 2013

Desecration at Karrakatta Cemetery - 19 May 2013

Desecration at Karrakatta Cemetery – 19 May 2013

“Saving Groves – WA” are asking people, from all over the world, to sign a petition to Members of the Legislative Assembly of the Government of Western Australia to get this sacrilegious practice stopped.  They report:

“For almost 30 years the Metropolitan Cemeteries Board has been clearing headstones from Karrakatta Cemetery and will commence this practice in the Fremantle Cemetery in the near future.

Previously headstones have been removed from many graves of our soldiers that fought and suffered badly during the wars so that we may have our freedom. Now they have no markers on their graves … is this the way we thank them?

Headstones from founding pioneers, people who have contributed historically to this state have had headstones removed … is this how we thank them?

Previously, valuable historic information and artefacts have been sent off and crushed for road base and we honour these people by driving over it.

The MCB have declared that this is no longer the practice however there has been limited evidence that this is the process.

The Metropolitan Cemeteries Board has other options available without removing headstones from graves but they refuse to consider these options.”

GRAVES at Karrakatta WA.

To sign the petition, please click on the link below:

http://www.change.org/en-AU/petitions/west-australian-government-bring-an-end-to-the-clearing-of-headstones-in-west-australian-cemeteries

People from all over Australia, and from all over  the world, have family buried in Western Australian Cemeteries… maybe one of your Ancestors has been laid to rest here?

GRAVES at Karrakatta WA. Please sign petition

  PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION, TO SAVE OUR SACRED SITES, WHICH READS:

To:
Members of the Legislative Assembly of the Government of Western Australia

We the undersigned petition the Western Australian Legislative Assembly to request the Minister for Local Government to direct the Metropolitan Cemeteries Board to cease their renewal program, specifically the removal of headstones, effective immediately. We petition the Members of the Legislative Assembly of WA to also undertake a further review of the Cemeteries Act WA 1986 to ensure the prevention of the desecration and removal of headstones from graves of people interned at all Cemeteries within Western Australia.

Sincerely,
[Your name]

ITS QUICK AND EASY –  PLEASE JUST CLICK HERE

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

I Won’t Fix You…I’ll Love You

What If Today...

“A friend is someone who gives you total freedom to be yourself.” ~ Jim Morrison

There’s a different kind of energy when doing anything with a friend – someone who might not enjoy what you do but, nonetheless, enjoys you. I have friends like that. Is there any other kind? I don’t think so.

Yesterday I stood on the porch of a new friend and heard my new friend describe me as her soulmate.

I laughed…and was touched.

Women are good for each other. What had happened for that relationship to blossom and grow in such a short time? As I reflected on the few hours we spent together yesterday and the weeks prior I saw a common thread: we just enjoyed each other’s company. I let her expose her true feelings about a past relationship that she was grieving, giving her permission to vent without judgement. I…

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TROVE TUESDAY: Susan’s first 15 years in South Australia…

It’s now 158 years since by Great Great Grandmother, Susan Kelleher, arrived in South Australia from Ireland, aboard the ill-fated Nashwauk and I was wondering what life was like for Susan, after her arrival? Did she often reflect back to the night of the wreck? Did she remember the Anniversary of that traumatic event as she made a life for herself in this foreign land?… Of course, we can never know the answers to these questions but I decided to use TROVE, and look through our digitised Australian newspapers, to get a sense of what was happening in the area where Susan made her home on the 15th Anniversary of the Wreck of the Nashwauk…  13 May 1870.

Back in Time

On her arrival in South Australia, Susan was initially housed in the German Hospital, Carrington Street, Adelaide and transported 4 months later to the newly established “Clare Servants Depot”, in the mid north of South Australia, from which she was employed by Mr Bryden, near Skillogalee Creek, at 5/- a week.

Four months later, on 17 Jan 1866, Susan married Edward Nicholls and they had three daughters, Catherine Ann, Mary Anne and Margaret Nicholls. On 20 Oct 1860, when Margaret was only 2 1/2 months old, Edward died of Bronchitis and was buried at his workplace, Bungaree Station. The following year Susan, who was working as a Dressmaker, purchased land at Armagh (just outside of the township of Clare) and settled in a home there with her 3 daughters.

Armagh

On 7 Feb 1864, after almost 3 1/2 years as a Widow, Susan married a near neighbour Timothy Rowen. By the time of the 15th Anniversary of her arrival, and the shipwreck, Susan had added to her family with 3 more children: Bridget, Eliza Jane (my great grandmother) and her only son Andrew Rowen.  She did go on to have another 2 children, Susan and Mary Ellen, but on 13 May 1870 Susan had been widowed, remarried, given birth to only 6 children of her 8 children and still lived at Armagh on the outskirts of the township of Clare with her husband and children.

 map-south-australia

Their local paper was the Northern Argus and this is what I found on Pages 1 and 2 which I expect would have been of interest to Susan and her husband, Timothy Rowen, as they worked and provided for their 6 children.

TROVE. Northern Argus 13May1870p.1

TROVE. Northern Argus 13May1870p.2

On page 3 I found this letter which shows that even 143 years ago the young were irritating their elders with “rowdy” behaviour.

TROVE. Northern Argus 13May1870p.3

So thanks to TROVE I have a snapshot of what daily life was like for Susan on the 15th Anniversary of her arrival and wonder if, in her busy life, she took a moment to reflect on her unusual landing in this new, and foreign, country.

Many thanks to Amy Houston, of Branches, Leaves & Pollen, for initiating the TROVE TUESDAY Theme.  Please click HERE to visit Amy’s Blog and HERE to read the contributions of others.

TROVE

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel 

MARITIME MONDAY: Anniversary of the wreck of the Nashwauk…

It was a dark Sunday morning, on this day 158 years ago, as  my Great Great Grandmother Susan Kelleher and her sister Bridget were sailing north along the coast of South Australia and were only 40 miles from their final destination when the “Nashwauk” ran aground. The young Irish servant girls were carried ashore on the sailor’s backs and violent storms over the following days ripped the ship apart and all my Susan’s worldly goods went down with it. The emigrant ship left Liverpool on 13 Feb 1855  with Captain McIntyre, as master, and 268 mostly Irish emigrants aboard and now met its fate on this lonely strip of South Australian coast exactly 3 months later.

I’ve written about the shipwreck on many occasions and today, on the 158th Anniversary of that fateful morning, discovered some recent photographs of the location of the wreck and decided to share. They are taken by an amazing young South Australian photographer, Joel Dawson, and I encourage you to visit his facebook page to enjoy many more stunning sights Joel has captured of my beautiful state of South Australia.

“The night was clear, with starlight and a fresh breeze, and one yellow point of light glanced across the water from the shadow of the land. At 4 a.m. the watch was changed. Clouds obscured the coast. Less than an hour later the Nashwauk was aground off the mouth of a creek that wanders half heartedly through the Moana sand hills.”

Copyright (c) Joel Dawson

Copyright (c) Joel Dawson

  View from the end of the Port Noarlunga jetty looking toward the wreck site.

“For half an hour after the Nashwauk struck the crew ‘made sail on her’ in a desperate effort to get her canted off, but, although her sails were all drawing, the surf, pounding in about her, shook the wind out of them and left her helpless. There she remained until the wind, setting in from the southward and westward next day drove her firmly on the reef, which in those waters lies some six feet beneath the sand.”

The passengers all made it safely to shore but one young woman, a servant girl Catherine Stanley, died later of exposure as did Captain McIntyre. The emigrants walked, or were taken inland by dray, to the township of Noarlunga and cared for overnight by the residents.

Copyright (c) Joel Dawson

Copyright (c) Joel Dawson

The Port Noarlunga jetty which was constructed in 1855  just prior to the wreck

The following morning the passengers were taken to the newly built Port Noarlunga jetty to be transported aboard the mail steamer “Thomas Melbourne” to be transported to Port Adelaide.

“Here the sea was so rough that boarding was impossible.  The Thomas Melbourne had to be relocated at the mouth of the Onkaparinga. So the passengers trudged another four kilometres along the cliff tops from Harriott’s Creek and reassembled at Gray’s Store near the present day footbridge.”

My Great Great Grandmother spoke of the terror she faced walking along those cliff tops with the raging sea below.

Copyright (c) Joel Dawson

Copyright (c) Joel Dawson

 Cliffs at Port Noarlunga

By the time they reached the boarding spot it was dark and only seventy girls agreed to get on the lurching steamer for the journey. The remainder were returned to Noarlunga and the following morning were taken overland, by dray, the city of Adelaide. My Susan, and her sister Bridget, were amongst those who refused to travel by sea and were lodged in the newly built “German Hospital” in, Carrington Street, until arrangements were made for their employment.

Some months later both Susan and Bridget travelled to the newly established “Servants Depot”, in the mid north township of Clare, and were soon employed within the district. However, that is another story… for another day.

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Thankyou to:

Joel Dawson for the magnificent photos. Please visit Joel’s facebook page, to enjoy more of his work, by clicking HERE.

Jean Callen, author of “What Really Happened to the Nashwauk?”  from which the quotes are taken. Printed by Butterfly Press, 225 Main North Road, Blackwood, South Australia. 5051. Tel: 08 8278 2899.  ISBN 0-9595356-2-4  © 2004

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Copyright © Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Musical Memories on Mother’s Day 2013…

My beautiful mum...

My beautiful mum…

Remembering my beautiful Mother… Kathleen Mary (Allan) Crout (31 Mar 1925 – 7 Sep 2007) and dedicating this enchanting song to her this Mother’s Day, 2013.

The lilting voice of  “Geraldine Sexton” drew my daughter, Kirrily Ann, and myself to Geraldine as she sat perched on a stone wall adjacent to the Bunratty Folk Museum in County Clare, Ireland in 1994…. My first visit to the land of our Ancestors.  This is for you mum…

 

My 2X Great Grandmother. Susan Kelleher

My 2X Great Grandmother. Susan Kelleher

Mum closely identified with our Irish Heritage which soon became part of my personal identification, through the stories passed down through the generations. We heard how the ship my Great Great Grandmother, Susan Kelleher, immigrated to South Australia on was wrecked as they were approaching their final destination. How everything she owned went down with the “Nashwauk”  and especially meaningful was hearing of Susan’s reluctance to leave her family, and her homeland… but that the effects of the “Potato Famine” made this a necessity.

I dedicate this song to my Susan Kelleher, born Country Clare, Ireland in 1836 and died in Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia on 9 Apr 1922 leaving behind three living daughters and one son, with three daughters deceased. “The grandchildren and great grandchildren number 71.”  Susan never did return to her native land.

 

Lastly I thank my precious children: Cullen Andrew, Jarren Vaughan (deceased), Kirrily Ann and Chad Sean Habel for enriching my life and loving me. This is for you my lovelies.

 

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Copyright © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel.

THOUGHTFUL THURSDAY: Reality TV and the Adelaide Taxi driver…

THURSDAY THOUGHTS  flowed for from the keyboard of “THE ADELAIDE TAXI DRIVER OF THE CITY” last week in response to a newspaper article regarding the continual screening of Reality TV shows…

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“My idea – put all the reality shows together that can only be shown for one hour a week.”

“Imagine an island loaded with single fat people who have to hunt and gather food to cook into a five star meal served in a renovated shack while singing and dancing.”

“They could find love amongst the other players, lose weight, get fit, be resourceful in finding food and building materials, invent tools.”

“And the losers never get to leave the island.”

“It’s just an idea.”

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SOURCE: Adelaide Advertiser, page 13. 26 April 2013.
http://adelaide.now.com.au

COPYRIGHT © 2013. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel.