WHAM!!! BAM…

Some things sure can hit you “out of the blue” and change your life forever.  Friday 21Feb2014 was a hot day, I wasn’t feeling well and the COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) was particularly difficult to manage but I had groceries to buy and especially medications… so I “soldiered” on.

After loading 10 bags of groceries in the boot I sat in the driver’s seat feeling v-e-r-y unwell. Not far from home, I figured sitting down with a delish cup of coffee is what was needed.  A few minutes later and not far from home it hit me…wham! bam!!!… couldn’t see a thing but did manage to locate the line in the middle of the road so focussed on that to try and judge where the side of the road was so I could pull over… then, one line down the centre of the road changed into two with one crossing over the other.  Intuitively I put a hand over one eye, then the other and worked out which one meant I had only one dotted line again… phew!!! By then I was close to the turn off into my street and very close to home.  Pulling into the driveway my sight returned, I just felt v-e-r-y tired and thought “that was weird”…

Long story to short it took a week to realise that in all probability it was a stroke… :-(  After three weeks in hospital, and a myriad of tests some things are still unclear but what we know is that, in addition to the COPD, I now have clots in the lungs and even had them on the tip of my right index finger… go figure…???  Seems that my body has been pinging off clots and one/ or part thereof made it to the right side of the brain and brought on the stroke. Have weakness down the left side but can make it around with a stick, have difficulty breathing and what is really annoying is the effect on my sight… blurred vision, difficult reading text with gaps appearing etc…  grrr

Well, I got out of hospital on 26Mar2014 and have had a “Rehabilitation in the Home” working with me to get me back “on track” asap. Have made progress but some annoying hiccups and another brief stay in hospital. However I am “on the mend” and just wanted to let my blogging friends and regular readers know that I haven’t “fallen off the twig” yet… Lucky me, eh?…  As my energy returns I will catch up on reading your blogs which I’ve missed terribly.

Many thanks also to those who’ve left fascinating comments which I’ll reply to asap and also some great emails from cousins re: their latest discoveries on our tree which is so exciting and I’ll get to as my energy quota allows it.

That’s all for now… I’m running out of puff at the minute but will get back to catching up on my reading very soon.  :-)

Cheerio for now and take good care everyone.

Musical Monday: Wake up my mind…

Badge. No conscripts to VietnamGrowing up in South Australia with all the horror of my brothers, their friends and mine threatened with the dreaded “lottery”… which could see them conscripted, at the age of 19, to go fight in Vietnam gave me a perspective which you can read about here.

Young people, at that time, gave voice to their opposition of government decisions which severely impacted on their  lives through music and song.  My children grew up to the sounds of “Songs of the Protest Era”and right now I can’t get one particular song out of my mind, given the way our Australian political situation is playing out right now.

Here it is…  Songs of the Protest Era

Here is the entire collection:

Songs of the Protest Era.2

Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Happy Australia Day, 2013.

Catherine:

Before Australia Day 2014 comes to an end I just have to share my post from 2013. For me, being Australian is being able to “take the piss” out of ourselves and not take ourselves too seriously.

Originally posted on Seeking Susan ~ Meeting Marie ~ Finding Family:

I’ll be off soon to enjoy my Australia Day “Aussie BBQ” …  may it be a happy day for everyone.

View original

FRIDAY FUNNY: Grandma and the family tree…

Genealogy. Grandma

There’s been a change in Grandma, we’ve noticed her of late,
She’s reading history or jotting down some date.
She’s tracking back the family; we’ll all have pedigrees.
Oh, Grandma’s got a hobby; she’s climbing Family Trees.

Poor Grandpa does the cooking and now, or so he states,
That worst of all, he has to wash the cups and Dinner plates.
Grandma can’t be bothered; she’s busy as a bee
Compiling Genealogy, for the Family Tree.

Cartoon. genealogist dietShe has no time to baby-sit, the curtains are a fright. No buttons left on Granddad’s shirt, the flower bed’s a sight.
She’s given up her club work, the serials on TV,
The only thing she does nowadays is climb the Family Tree.

She goes down to the Courthouse and studies ancient lore,
We know more about our forebears than we ever knew before.
The books are old and dusty, they make poor Grandma sneeze,
A minor irritation when you’re climbing Family Trees.

Cartoon - genealogy stuck in fam treeThe mail is all for Grandma, it comes from near and far,
Last week she got the proof she needs to join the DAR
A worthwhile avocation, to that we all agree,
A monumental project, to climb the Family Tree.

Now some folks came from Scotland and some from Galway Bay,
Some were French as pastry, some German, all the way.
Some went on West to stake their claim. Some stayed near by the sea.
Grandma hopes to find them all as she climbs the Family Tree.

She wanders through the graveyard in search of date or name,
The rich, the poor, the in-between, all sleeping there the same.
She pauses now and then to rest, fanned by a gentle breeze,
That blows above the Fathers of all our Family Trees.

Cartoon. genealogist parkingThere were pioneers and patriots mixed in our kith and kin, Who blazed the paths of wilderness and fought through thick and thin.
But none more staunch than Grandma, whose eyes light up with glee,
Each times she finds a missing branch for the Family Tree.

Their skills were wide and varied, from Carpenter to Cook,
And one (Alas) the record shows was hopelessly a crook.
Blacksmith, weaver, farmer, judge, some tutored for a fee.
Long lost in time, now all recorded on the Family Tree.

To some it’s just a hobby, to Grandma it’s much more,
She knows the joys and heartaches of those who went before. They loved, they lost, they laughed, they wept, and now for you and me
They live again in spirit, around the Family Tree.

Quote - GenealogyAt last she’s nearly finished and we are each exposed.
Life will be the same again, this we supposed!
Grandma will cook and sew, serve cookies with our tea.
We’ll all be fat, just as before that wretched Family Tree.

Sad to relate, The Preacher called and visited for a spell,
We talked about the Gospel, and other things as well,
The heathen folk, the poor- and then- ’twas fate, it had to be,
Somehow the conversation turned to Grandma and the Family Tree.

Cartoon Genealogy Research.

We tried to change the subject, we talked of everything,
But then in Grandma’s voice we heard that old familiar ring.
She told him all about the past and soon was plain to see,
The Preacher, too, was nearly snared by Grandma and the Family Tree.

He never knew his Grandpa, his mother’s name was….Clark?
He and Grandma talked and talked, outside it grew quite dark.
We’d hoped our fears were groundless, but just like some disease,
Grandma’s become an addict — She’s hooked on Family Trees.

Genealogy. addictedOur souls were filled with sorrow, our hearts sank with dismay
Our ears could scarce believe the words we heard our Grandma say,
“It sure is a lucky thing that you have come to me,
I know exactly how it’s done, I’ll climb your Family Tree”.
- Author unknown

~~~~~~~~~

Thankyou to the Genealogy Research Assistant for this delightful poem

Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Are your ancestors also German/Prussian immigrants?…

Researching family history fills me with delight and can have many unexpected consequences. Some discoveries, however, are not particularly pleasant. One extremely valuable outcome is to be alerted to health problems which have been passed on through the generations. What a surprise it was to come across info about the “FH Morocco Gene”  and immediately recognising that my husband, and our children and grandchildren, could well be carrying the life threatening “Barossa Heart Gene”.

Barossa. cholesterol-study. prof Ian Hamilton-CraigProfessor Ian Hamilton-Craig, from the Griffith University School of Medicine, has been working with local doctors in the Barossa region of South Australia with the aim of identifying carriers of the familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) gene in a bid to provide them with treatment and reduce their risk of premature heart disease.

He noticed, when working in his cardiology practice in North Adelaide, that many of his patients from the Barossa area who were of German Lutheran background and a significant number from the Silesian area were at risk of early death because of a special gene mutation and causes very high cholesterol levels which can lead to death by heart attack at a very young age.

“People with FH, whose cholesterol is untreated, usually show very early coronary heart disease and can even die prematurely,” Professor Hamilton-Craig says. “FH is one of the most common metabolic diseases of genetic origin. We think it may be even more common than type 1 diabetes and it’s all due to a single gene mutation affecting cholesterol. We would like to hear from anyone in Australia who thinks he or she may be descended from these early Lutheran settlers, and who may have a high cholesterol or family history of premature coronary heart disease’, he said. It can exist in thin people who have a good, low fat diet.

Prof Hamilton-Craig stresses there is no need for people to be unduly concerned.

“Those who think they could carry the gene can have a cholesterol test with their local family doctor, which may be followed up with a DNA test, and if this is shown to be FH, suitable medication can be prescribed’, he said. “It is very important to test close family members as well, so that treatment can begin as early in life as possible.”

It happens that both of my children’s paternal great grandparents, Maria Mathilde Grosser and Emil Wilhelm Habel, are of Silesian descent.

Habel, Grosser marriage pic

Karl Albert Hermann Grosser, and his wife Anna Rosina Wogisch Grosser, were bfhs. grosser plaqueamongst the second wave of Lutheran immigrants to South Australia who were fleeing religious persecution. Accompanied by Pastor Fritschke. They travelled aboard the “Skyjold” arriving in Port Adelaide on 27 Oct 1842 with their six children. Their third child, Hermann Eduard Louis Grosser was 10 years old when arriving in South Australia and is the father of Maria Mathilde Grosser.

Interestingly Karl Albert Hermann Grosser, died at the early age of 50 and his son, Hermann Eduard Louis Grosser, my children’s 2x Great Grandfather, died aged 49.  Premature death is one of the “markers” we’re encouraged to look for in our family records.

bfhs. johann caeserOn the Habel side of the equation, Maria Mathilde Grosser married Emil Wilhelm Habel who is also of Silesian descent. My research shows that the Habels were slightly later immigrants. They came as a family group… i.e. mother, father and adult children (some with spouses) aboard the “Johann Caeser” arriving in Port Adelaide, South Australia, along with approximately 268 other German and Prussian migrants, on 1 Jan 1855.

Emil Wilhelm Habel, my children’s Great Grandfather was a first generation South Australian, born in Lyndoch on the 12 Jun 1856. The first child of Johann Friedrich August Habel and Johanne Henriette (Siefert) Habel who arrived on the “Johann Caeser” along with his parents, brothers and their spouses. Johann  and Johanne took up residence in Dutton, South Australia where Johann became highly regarded with his sheep breeding and involvement in civic matters, particularly as Chairman of the Truro District Council… but that’s another story for another day.

So there you have it.  Thanks to my family history research we now know about this “Barossa Heart Gene” and what the next step needs to be. You gotta love the Internet, eh?

Anyone who thinks they might be descended from early German/ Prussian/Silesian Lutherans can visit the website www.barossaheart.com for more information or contact the Barossa Family Heart Study coordinator Sheila Storrs by emailing barossafhs@gmail.com

~~~~~~~~~

Resources and further information:
http://app.griffith.edu.au/news/2013/06/17/the-search-for-the-high-cholesterol-gene/
http://www.lca.org.au/research-study-checks-our-bloodlines.html

~~~~~~~~~
Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

TROVE TUESDAY: Jaywalkin’…

Banner. The Barrier Miner

Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 – 1954  - Wednesday 13 February 1924, page 3

TROVE. Jay walking.2

TROVE. Jay walking.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/page/3275806

Nothing in the past every truly goes away…

TROVE jay walking-cop-issuing-jay-walk-fines

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/fines-for-jaywalking-double/story-e6frea6u-1226367424693

WHAT IS JAY WALKIN’?… glad you asked    :lol:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaywalking

TROVE

~~~~~~~~~
Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

Susan, Edward and Bungaree Station…

How lucky can you be, eh?  Is it serendipity or maybe another force at work here? … No worries, all I know is that today it came to me to log onto E-Bay and go on a search in “books, magazines” with a focus on South Australia… then up it popped.

“The Story of Bungaree Station by Rob Linn.

Paperback book published by Bungaree Station 2011, unpaginated with black and white photographs as well as some black and white illustrations, colour photographs and colour illustrations.”

Bungaree Station. book

I simply clicked, clicked and clicked again and this book will soon be winging its way to me…  “quicker than you can say Jack Robinson”.

Why am I so happy?… glad you asked.    :lol:

My Susan arrived from Ireland, aged 18, and was employed from the Clare Depot by a Mr Bryden at 5/- a week. Eight months later, on 15 Jan 1856,  Susan married Edward Nicholls and they had three daughters; Catherine Ann, Mary Anne and Margaret Nicholls.

Four years later, when Susan and Edward’s youngest babe Margaret was just 10 weeks old, her daddy died of pneumonia, at the age of 26, and was buried at his workplace… Bungaree Station. I’ve had trouble locating records of Edward’s burial place and especially an understanding of his working life. Hopefully this book will take me a step closer with the understanding. The blurb reads:

“Bungaree Station, 140 kilometres north of Adelaide, South Australia, is a unique cultural tourism destination. Within its buildings, site, artefacts, memorabilia and historic documents lies the story of rural Australia over the last 170 years. There are few other centres of Australia’s wool-growing history that have so meticulously retained the historic documentation behind the settlement, management and progress of operations.

Bungaree Homestead 1863

Bungaree Homestead 1863

The story of Bungaree Station is full of fascination. The story began on Christmas Day 1841, when the brothers George, Charles and James Hawker, Sons of an Admiral in the British Navy, came upon and settled at the place that became Bungaree Station. From that point on, the fortunes of the Hawker family mirrored the history of South Australia. The records they kept, in word and picture, reveal the story of pastoral occupation and the European settlement of the land. Bungaree was a rare gem at the height of the pastoral era and it is this fact that makes the buildings and their interpretation so significant for visitors, cultural tourists and the study of Australia’s history.

 Source: Wikipedia

Source: Wikipedia

For generations the Hawker family have kept alive the core of Bungaree Station’s heritage. Central to their thoughts was the preservation and use of the buildings that are at the heart of Bungaree Station’s life.”

So, colour me happy and you can be sure that I’ll be sharing any info which may arise as a result of this exciting discovery    :shock:

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel

“… and a new one just begun”

In the words of John Lennon…

“Another year over
 And a new one just begun”

New Year 2014

May 2014 bring you, and your loved ones, peace and contentment in abundance…

Detail: Keith P. Phillips, Pyrotechny, 1945, Adelaide, Gift of the Phillips Family to Art Gallery of South Australia 2004.

Detail: Keith P. Phillips, Pyrotechny, 1945, Adelaide, Gift of the Phillips Family to Art Gallery of South Australia 2004.

Never before have I seen the statue of South Australia’s founder, Colonel William Light, so beautifully displayed…  Thanks to the Art Gallery of South Australia.

New Year resolution

~~~~~~~~~

Copyright © 2014. Catherine Ann Crout-Habel